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Arts: the week ahead

DANISH DANCE THEATRE Since taking over the reins in 2001, artistic director/choreographer Tim Rushton has infused his company’s repertoire with dances of explosive energy and elegant athleticism. This Boston debut features two new Rushton works, ‘‘Enigma’’ and ‘‘CaDance,’’ as well as the poetic ‘‘Kridt (Chalk)’’ and the beatnik-inspired ‘‘Shadowland.’’ This is a can’t miss. Presented by Celebrity Series of Boston. Pictured: ‘‘Kridt (Chalk).’’ April 27-28. $39-$54. Paramount Theatre. 617-482-6661, www.celebrityseries.org DANISH DANCE THEATRE Since taking over the reins in 2001, artistic director/choreographer Tim Rushton has infused his company’s repertoire with dances of explosive energy and elegant athleticism. This Boston debut features two new Rushton works, ‘‘Enigma’’ and ‘‘CaDance,’’ as well as the poetic ‘‘Kridt (Chalk)’’ and the beatnik-inspired ‘‘Shadowland.’’ This is a can’t miss. Presented by Celebrity Series of Boston. Pictured: ‘‘Kridt (Chalk).’’ April 27-28. $39-$54. Paramount Theatre. 617-482-6661, www.celebrityseries.org (Henrik Stenberg)
April 22, 2010

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THEATER

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN It’s . . . alive! Or is it? Mel Brooks’s reanimated musical monster lumbers into town. Through May 2. Opera House. 800-982-2787, www.broadwayacrossamerica.com

TRAD So funny you’ll weep, so tragic you won’t stop laughing — aye, a fine Irish play. Carmel O’Reilly directs the pitch-perfect Colin Hamell, Billy Meleady, and Nancy E. Carroll in a Tir Na Theatre Company production. Through April 24. Plaza Black Box Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts. 617-933-8600, www.bostontheatrescene.com

LE CABARET GRIMM Moody, memorable, and just a little too meandering, Performance Lab’s “punk cabaret fairy tale’’ features different opening acts each weekend. Through April 24. Plaza Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts. 617-933-8600, www.bostontheatrescene.com

FROM ORCHIDS TO OCTOPI: AN EVOLUTIONARY LOVE STORY Catalyst Collaborative@MIT presents the premiere of Melinda Lopez’s new play, a dazzling blend of science, art, and domestic life with a knockout muraled set by David Fichter. Through May 2. Central Square Theater, Cambridge. 866-811-4111, www.centralsquaretheater.org

LADY DAY AT EMERSON’S BAR & GRILL Jacqui Parker captures the strength and sorrow of jazz legend Billie Holiday. Through April 24. Lyric Stage Company. 617-585-5678, www.lyricstage.com LOUISE KENNEDY THE LITTLE MERMAID Sharks, jellyfish, and other schools of fish swim about in Wheelock Family Theatre’s beautifully realized production. But don’t go expecting Disney’s musical version. For this adaptation, playwright Linda Daugherty returns to Hans Christian Andersen’s original story. Award-winning actress Andrea Ross plays Pearl, the Little Mermaid. Through May 16. Wheelock Family Theatre. 617-879-2300, www.wheelockfamilytheatre.org TERRY BYRNE

DANCE
NORA CHIPAUMIRE The Zimbabwe-born Chipaumire, former associate artistic director of Urban Bush Women, explores the experience of exile in “Lions Will Roar, Swans Will Fly, Angels Will Wrestle Heaven, Rains Will Break: Gukurahundi.’’ The performance will be accompanied by live music by Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited. April 23-25. $40. Presented by World Music/CRASHarts at Institute of Contemporary Art. 617-876-4275, www.worldmusic.org

BOSOMA AND CONTRAPOSE DANCE This promising collaborative evening features three premieres by each company. Contrapose offers a new work by veteran Marcus Schulkind and commissioned premieres by Gianni Di Marco and Nicole Pierce. The high-energy, athletic dancers of BoSoma contribute three premieres by Katherine Hooper. April 23-24. $20-$25. Boston University Dance Theater. 617-358-2500, www.bosoma.org

BRACKO AND CASSANDRA CAN FLOAT Poet Ann Carson is known for her mashups of poetry, dance, and performance art in collaboration with such luminaries as Laurie Anderson and Lou Reed. Merce Cunningham Dance Company’s Rashaun Mitchell choreographed and dances (with Marcie Munnerlyn) these two Greek-influenced works. Robert Currie adds a visual arts component. April 24. Free. Wellesley College’s Jewett Auditorium, Wellesley. 781-283-2698. www.wellesley.edu/NCH KAREN CAMPBELL

MUSEUMS
DR. LAKRA A survey of the work of the Mexican tattoo artist Dr. Lakra, whose complex designs are inscribed on various found imagery and applied directly to the gallery wall in two massive wall drawings. Through Sept. 6. Institute of Contemporary Art. 617-478-3100, www.icaboston.org

UNDER THE SKIN: TATTOOS IN JAPANESE PRINTS Tattoos became popular in 19th-century Japan after the artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi made a series of woodblock prints featuring Chinese martial arts heroes with spectacular tattoos. Tattoo artists copied these designs, and artists were in turn influenced by new tattoos. This show explores the phenomenon. Through Jan. 2. Museum of Fine Arts. 617-267-9300, www.mfa.org.

FIERY POOL: THE MAYA AND THE MYTHIC SEA A fascinating exhibition about the connections between the cosmology of the Maya and water, featuring rare loans from around the world and unobtrusive interactive elements directed at younger viewers. Through July 18. Peabody Essex Museum, Salem. 978-745-9500, www.pem.org

RONI HORN AKA RONI HORN A career survey of this influential contemporary artist from New York, whose subject is the mutability of identity. Organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Through June 13. Institute of Contemporary Art. 617-478-3100, www.icaboston.org. SEBASTIAN SMEE

GALLERIES
GOING FORWARD, LOOKING BACK: PRACTICING HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSES IN THE 21st CENTURY Artists examine contemporary issues through the lens of 19th-century techniques. Works include collage-like abstractions by Peter Madden and surreal pinhole cyanotypes by Jesseca Ferguson. Through May 28. Trustman Art Gallery, Simmons College, 300 the Fenway. 617-521-2268, www.simmons.edu/trustman

TRIIIBE Identical triplets and performance artists Alicia, Kelly, and Sara Casilio collaborate with photographer Cary Wolinsky and others to create large-scale narrative photographs that delve into the nature and politics of identity and ask, ‘‘How are we the same? How are we different?’’ Through May 29. Gallery Kayafas, 450 Harrison Ave. 617-482-0411, www.gallerykayafas.com

CHRISTINE HIEBERT: INTERVENTIONS New works in charcoal and ink from an artist who has called drawing “the problem of the line, how to form it, and how to follow it.’’ She also has wall drawings up at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center at Wellesley College. Through May 15. Victoria Munroe Fine Art, 161 Newbury St. 617-523-0661, www.victoriamunroefineart.com

EXTRAORDINARY: PUPPETRY, STORYTELLING, & SPIRIT This celebration of the art of the puppet includes giant papier-mâché characters from Bread and Puppet Theater, an interactive marionette stage by Donald Saaf and Julia Zanes, Indian shadow puppets, and much more. Through May 16. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park, Newtonville. 617-964-3424, www.newartcenter.org CATE McQUAID