Send us your suggestions

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BDCAEStaff. Show BDCAEStaff's posts

    Send us your suggestions

    What book would you want to read for a city-wide book club?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from rosern. Show rosern's posts

    Dark Tide

    The Dark Tide by Stephen Puleo is a look at the City of Boston during WWI. It is the story of the great molasses flood, an event that a lot of people know little about. Puleo examines why the tank was built and under what circumstances that lead to its eventual failure. 

    Throughout the story, I was struck by the parallels to today. More than a tale about a tank of molasses, Dark Tide takes a hard look at at politics, rascism, and nationalism that was part of daily life in the Hub in 1919.


     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from sharonshaloo. Show sharonshaloo's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    If you visit the Mass Center for the Book website you will find, under the Book Awards section, ten years of great books written by Mass writers or about the commonwealth (http://massbook.org/pastwinners.html).  Any of those books would make for great community reads.  If you click into the "Census" section, you'll find even more books to think about.  

    You can also check out the "Massachusetts" section of the Library of Congress/Center for the Book "One Book Programs" page to see the nearly 40 (and counting) communities in Mass that run one-book programs (http://www.read.gov/resources/). 

    All that said, I wonder a bit about an all-city reads program for a place as large, diverse, and fundamentally literate as Boston because I think there's a tipping point between bringing a community together around a shared reading experience and imposing a curriculum from a central authority.

    I've long thought it could be more interesting and innovative to think about an All Back Bay Reads, All Mattapan Reads, All Dorchester Reads, and etc, with all neighborhoods reading at the same time and then coming together to talk about the many books being read across the city so that diversity might be foregrounded in the common purpose.

    In other words, since Boston hasn't been compelled to jump on the bandwagon, maybe it could create an interesting variation that moves the project forward in a new way?

    My two cents, 

    Sharon Shaloo, Director, Massachusetts Center for the Book

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from tallypoo. Show tallypoo's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    I'd like to see Boston read The Omnivore's Dilemma, by Michael Pollan.  

    Interest in eating sustainably and humanely has increased dramatically in Boston over the last several years, as evidenced by the popularity of the city's farmer's markets and residents' participation in local CSAs.  Many of Boston's restaurants are helping to lead the charge by offering seasonal menus featuring local ingredients, and by influencing the supply chain.  But the average Bostonian still doesn't have a strong understanding of the systems that bring us our food, and the impact of those systems on our planet and our bodies.  

    The Omnivore's Dilemma isn't the Bible on this topic, but it's pretty darn close.  Plus, it's a compelling, accessible read, full of interesting information and ripe for discussion.  

    Thanks,
    Leah Bloom
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Highandinside. Show Highandinside's posts

    Re: Dark Tide

    In Response to Dark Tide:
    The Dark Tide by Stephen Puleo is a look at the City of Boston during WWI. It is the story of the great molasses flood, an event that a lot of people know little about. Puleo examines why the tank was built and under what circumstances that lead to its eventual failure.  Throughout the story, I was struck by the parallels to today. More than a tale about a tank of molasses, Dark Tide takes a hard look at at politics, rascism, and nationalism that was part of daily life in the Hub in 1919.
    Posted by rosern

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Highandinside. Show Highandinside's posts

    Re: Dark Tide


    "The Dark Tide" is an excellent suggestion!  It is a well-written book.

    Another suggestion is J. Anthony Lucas's "Common Ground" about the busing era in Boston and its effect on different families.

    In Response to Re: Dark Tide:
    In Response to Dark Tide :
    Posted by Highandinside

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pmalcpoet. Show pmalcpoet's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Tinkers, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. It is a gem, the writing exquisite, yet very accessible. Set in New England, local author, what more could you want?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from LOUIES215. Show LOUIES215's posts

    Two EXCEPTIONAL children's books!

     BY BERNADINE FEAGINS ON AMAZON AND 48 STORES   - HAKIM AND TERRANCE SHADOW MYSTERY -

     is a children's book about a boy named Hakim and his faithful dog, Shadow. One day Shadow gets lost and a journey begins to find him. He calls upon his best friend Terrance and together they try to solve the mystery. Along the way they receive help from neighbors in their community and learn valuable lessons about friendship and never giving up hope. It is an amazing story.
    &


    KIDS DREAM BIG  -
    Great children's reading book ...... Fourteen- year - old Pam Jackson lives with her single mother and her brother, James Jackson. Like any brother, James gives Pam a hard time, but the trouble doesn't end there for Pam or James. Kids Dream Big is a helpful literature story that helps children's to cope with self esteem, career choices and sensitive family subjects in away that also touch's your heart. This is an exceptional children's book!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jb-doran. Show jb-doran's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    "All Souls: A Family Story from Southie", by Michael Patrick MacDonald.  Local author, local story, honest look at Boston. Quite simply one of the most moving books I've ever read. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from chuzhee. Show chuzhee's posts

    Re: Bleak House

    It would be a year-long endeavor reading that novel, as it is quite a tome, but every human emotion is ripe for microscopic analysis. More importantly, have every judge in America read it and make them sign a manifesto to make litigation more humane by controlling runaway attorneys.  The more things change, the more they stay the same.  That would be very apparent if the city were to choose that book. 
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from MarginalNative. Show MarginalNative's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Anthony Lukas's Pulitzer Prize-winning Common Ground. Not only is this the best book about Boston ever written, but it might be the best book written about any American city to date.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from KayBooks. Show KayBooks's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Pishey Thompson - Man of Two Worlds by Isabel Bailey

    A well written book bringing to life a man of considerable significance in the USA in the 1820s and 30s. The rather shadowy, dry and very proper figure of Pishey Thompson as a bank official and author of a monumental history of Boston in England is presented here as a very human man with strengths and failings. He was a highly successful, and then bankrupt, bookseller in Washington City, USA. Pishey Thompson was naturalised as an American but lived the last 15 years of his life, and died, in London, England.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Cariad. Show Cariad's posts

    "A City So Grand"

    How about Stephen Puleo's new book, A City So Grand?  Followed by his book, Dark Tide and then, The Boston Italians. . . .

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jme36. Show jme36's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Howells: The Rise of Silas Lapham
    Marquand: The Late George Apley
    Stafford: Boston Adventure
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from LynahFaithful. Show LynahFaithful's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    "All Souls: A Family Story from Southie", by Michael Patrick MacDonald.  Local author, local story, honest look at Boston. Quite simply one of the most moving books I've ever read. 
    Posted by jb-doran


    SECONDED!
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from willaloy. Show willaloy's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Rocket Boys/October Sky by Homer Hickham
    Good book, originally published as Rocket Boys, made into October Sky movie and now also published with that title.
    It's a true story and uplifting.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ModerateDem. Show ModerateDem's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    The Bible - cover to cover.   Massachusetts needs it bad.  Send a copy to our President.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkw71. Show jkw71's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    "The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s" would be a good read for a populace that considers itself engaged civicly, intellectual, and progressive.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from gloomy1597. Show gloomy1597's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    the book thief.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jeanne1701. Show Jeanne1701's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson. Think we have it hard in Boston? I would recommend we not read something by local writers about or set here. One thing we sorely lack as a community is perspective. I just read this book for a class on the dynamics of social and community change. It was incredibly inspiring. Mortenson shows what people can do when they are committed to and stay focused on their goals and understand that they need to work with others to achieve them.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from HometownGirl. Show HometownGirl's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    I think a fun summer read that will make everyone laugh and feel good....         "At Least In the City Someone Will Hear You Scream" by Wade Rouse

    It is an absoultely wonderful fun read that also makes you think about what is really important in life.  I highly recommend it.

    Enjoy!

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from larson_je. Show larson_je's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    Common Ground, definitely
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from trvl. Show trvl's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    the little book of happiness...amazon sells it. its all about how to lose your ego and live a happy life...imagine a whole city without ego's....
    road rage would be a thing of the past.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from akhakh. Show akhakh's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from 34446. Show 34446's posts

    Re: Send us your suggestions

    In Response to Re: Send us your suggestions:
    If you visit the Mass Center for the Book website you will find, under the Book Awards section, ten years of great books written by Mass writers or about the commonwealth ( http://massbook.org/pastwinners.html ).  Any of those books would make for great community reads.  If you click into the "Census" section, you'll find even more books to think about.   You can also check out the "Massachusetts" section of the Library of Congress/Center for the Book "One Book Programs" page to see the nearly 40 (and counting) communities in Mass that run one-book programs ( http://www.read.gov/resources/ ).  All that said, I wonder a bit about an all-city reads program for a place as large, diverse, and fundamentally literate as Boston because I think there's a tipping point between bringing a community together around a shared reading experience and imposing a curriculum from a central authority. I've long thought it could be more interesting and innovative to think about an All Back Bay Reads, All Mattapan Reads, All Dorchester Reads, and etc, with all neighborhoods reading at the same time and then coming together to talk about the many books being read across the city so that diversity might be foregrounded in the common purpose. In other words, since Boston hasn't been compelled to jump on the bandwagon, maybe it could create an interesting variation that moves the project forward in a new way? My two cents,  Sharon Shaloo, Director, Massachusetts Center for the Book
    Posted by sharonshaloo

     

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