American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

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    American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    Whether you watched the Patriots game Saturday night or not ... you certainly had to have heard about it.  (I hope so, anyhow)  :D

    Now about the cold temps at Foxboro ... brrrrrrrrr 

    Before the game, the newscasters were checking out the pre-game tailgaters and interviewed some of the intrepid souls at the game (all of their comments were a riot).  

    Then came this guy who wore only a long-sleeved jersey, no jacket and no gloves -- (!!!) who was from Canada (no specific city / province given); the newscaster asked him how cold he thought it was in Foxboro -- here's his response:

    "American cold?  Or Canadian cold?"   He said that our version of "cold" was fine for him and we should find out what it's like where he lives.   No thanks.  :)

    Anyhow, I just wanted to post this for our friend, Hfx  -- though not a Patriots fan from what I understand -- not only because it was pretty funny, but out of respect for handling cold temps better than many Bostonians.   Well, um, I'll speak for myself, and say better than *this* Bostonian, anyhow.   

    It's a holiday here, so take it easy.  Posting will resume tomorrow.  Take the day off and stay warm.  :)
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    Cold is cold and anything below 32f should be considered illegal. Actually, in my book, anything below 75 f should be illegal. All the mini-skirts disappear in the cold weather.
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    I'm a Patriots fan with connections in Canada. My sister lives in Ottawa and my nephew and his wife live in Yellowknife. I've been on one trip to Ottawa in the winter and didn't experience any extreme winter cold. Actually, I visited one spring in Ottawa and found it incredibly hot! But Canada is a big country and my nephew has lived in some far northern places that are pretty barren and have long, unforgiving winters. I would guess the ocean has a moderating effect on the weather in Nova Scotia. 

     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    The average January temperature in Halifax is about 5 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the average January temperature in Boston.  So we're not that much worse off.  The really cold cities in Canada are the prairie cities like Winnipeg (or 'Winterpeg' as it's known) where Neil Young grew up.
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]Cold is cold and anything below 32f should be considered illegal. Actually, in my book, anything below 75 f should be illegal. All the mini-skirts disappear in the cold weather.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I am so with you, but I have to say that there is bone-chilling cold that goes right through you, even when the actual temperature isn't that cold (the dampness near the coast).

    Canada is huge, I know, I was only going on the brief little interview, but I had the feeling this Patriots fan wasn't too far from the border near us, and maybe even from Halifax.   Ha.  

    Keep cozy.  :D
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]The average January temperature in Halifax is about 5 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the average January temperature in Boston.  So we're not that much worse off.  The really cold cities in Canada are the prairie cities like Winnipeg, or 'Winterpeg' as it's known. 
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut[/QUOTE]

    Just quoting the guy from the interview -- and I don't care what he's used to, he was only wearing a jersey, and he did not seem to be shivering.  

    Must have had a flask hidden from the camera ... :D

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    I find if it gets in the 30's during the winter that it is not too bad. We've had quite a mild winter so far, which makes these short cold snaps a shock to the system. But give me the 30's and I'm happy.
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]The average January temperature in Halifax is about 5 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the average January temperature in Boston.  So we're not that much worse off.  The really cold cities in Canada are the prairie cities like Winnipeg (or 'Winterpeg' as it's known) where Neil Young grew up.
    Posted by Hfxsoxnut[/QUOTE]


    My Uncle Larry in Nova Scotia told me a while ago that snow is an increasingly rare occurrence up there...compared to years prior...something to do with the gulfstream perhaps...?  I would suspect the coastal areas see less of it than the high ground further inland....

    But then my grandmother tells me stories of Thunder Bay, Ontario - where the snow was so deep at times, they had to attach tall flags to the kids' jackets to keep track of them...!!  She's not given to tall tales, so I tend to believe her.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    All I know about Canada is that in the town of Strafford Ontario where my ex-in-laws live, snow flurries to them mean at least a foot.

    Was up there for Xmas back in the late 80's. My ex and her siblings were outside on Xmas Eve and my mother in-law asked why I wasn't out with them. She said it was nice out (18 inches of snow and 10 f). I knew it was time to get out of that family then. 
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :) : My Uncle Larry in Nova Scotia told me a while ago that snow is an increasingly rare occurrence up there...compared to years prior...something to do with the gulfstream perhaps...?  I would suspect the coastal areas see less of it than the high ground further inland.... But then my grandmother tells me stories of Thunder Bay, Ontario - where the snow was so deep at times, they had to attach tall flags to the kids' jackets to keep track of them...!!  She's not given to tall tales, so I tend to believe her.
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    I am glad I posted this bit about the Canadian guy, as I am howling over these stories.  :)

    I was not coddled as a kid (I once tried to break the door down, with my mother standing in front of it, when I was in 2nd grade during a blaster snowstorm, because I was supposed to be "teacher's helper" that day and school had been called off -- I was furiously arguing with my mother telling her I *HAD* to be at school that day!)  -- a kid who wanted to go to school on a snow day?    

    Yes, I have changed.   :D
     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    In Response to Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]All I know about Canada is that in the town of Strafford Ontario where my ex-in-laws live, snow flurries to them mean at least a foot. Was up there for Xmas back in the late 80's. My ex and her siblings were outside on Xmas Eve and my mother in-law asked why I wasn't out with them. She said it was nice out (18 inches of snow and 10 f). I knew it was time to get out of that family then. 
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I am howling here.  :D

    I can only imagine ... you -- them -- and no way.  :P
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    Halifax's craziest weather events in my lifetime occurred within a few months of each other.  In October 2003 we were hit by Hurricane Juan.  Then in February 2004 we had an incredible snowstorm that lasted a day and a half and dumped more than 3 feet of snow on the city.  We called it 'White Juan'.  Here's a picture.



     
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    Now the 'Ice Man'...he knows cold!




    Albert Collins.....'The Ice Man.'

    ...or ask John Shaft:




    "Hey, brother how about doin' some rappin'"

    "Easy...man, you is jus' too cold, brother!"

     
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    Re: American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :)

    Ilong-sleevedn Response to American cold? Or Canadian cold? Now just a second here... :):
    [QUOTE]Whether you watched the Patriots game Saturday night or not ... you certainly had to have heard about it.  (I hope so, anyhow)   :D Now about the cold temps at Foxboro ... brrrrrrrrr  Before the game, the newscasters were checking out the pre-game tailgaters and interviewed some of the intrepid souls at the game (all of their comments were a riot).   Then came this guy who wore only a long-sleeved jersey, no jacket and no gloves -- (!!!) who was from Canada (no specific city / province given); the newscaster asked him how cold he thought it was in Foxboro -- here's his response: "American cold?  Or Canadian cold?"   He said that our version of "cold" was fine for him and we should find out what it's like where he lives.   No thanks.  :) Anyhow, I just wanted to post this for our friend, Hfx  -- though not a Patriots fan from what I understand -- not only because it was pretty funny, but out of respect for handling cold temps better than many Bostonians.   Well, um, I'll speak for myself, and say better than *this* Bostonian, anyhow.    It's a holiday here, so take it easy.  Posting will resume tomorrow.  Take the day off and stay warm.  :)
    Posted by yogafriend[/QUOTE

    Our Canadian friends are partially right. There are two colds, freezing and $%^&*Freezing. Jessey's also right, Cold is cold. After spending the last few Winter's above the 39th parallel I can honestly at-test to this fact. The avg winter temp was around 7 in Palmer (Fairbanks), and on some days  -15-to -30 was not uncommon, compared to that, Foxboro was a virtual heat-wave. Your body does acclimate to the cold pretty quickly if your out in it all the time, But, I'm not
    sure i saw too many folks walking around in long-sleeved tee-shirts even when temps would reach a balmy 20 :)
     
     

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