American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    For all the history / culture vultures, check your local listings; the latest installment of American Experience will air locally tonight, January 14th.

    American Experience: 1964  

    Recalling 1964, a pivotal year in U.S. history. While the Beatles captured the imaginations of the nation's youth, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, unveiled his vision of a "Great Society" and squared off against Barry Goldwater.

    If this two-hour documentary came from another network, you might be inclined to dismiss it as another example of knee-jerk anniversary journalism, the "It's been 50 years since 1964, let's takes a nostalgic look back" approach. But as you'd expect from a series as strong as American Experience, 1964 is interested in much more than just a walk through the great events of the year or an introduction to the great personalities, though both are impressive lists.

    Instead, the point is to link those events and people to the major social changes that still reverberate today, from the birth of the civil-rights movement and feminism, to the cultural explosion caused by The Beatles, to the political divides between liberals and conservatives and counterculture and traditional values.

     

    - See more at: http://www.weta.org/tv/program/american-experience-1964#sthash.X6Ct2CDE.dpuf

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    BTW, I was reading more details of the '1964' documentary, and just have to show this to you. I also wonder who, among you, knew about this incident, from what you've read? 

    Just two small clips:

     

    "So what else happened in 1964? The Beatles invaded. A brash young Kentuckian named Cassius Clay beat the heavily favored Sonny Liston for the heavyweight title and filled the airwaves with swagger."

    and as told by veteran sportswriter Robert Lipsyte:  

    On tour in America, the Beatles stopped by Clay’s training headquarters in Miami to meet the mouth that roared before the Liston fight. Clay, who would soon change his name to Muhammad Ali, spotted a killer photo op and proceeded to goof off with the Fab Four for the cameras (the resulting images are priceless). They all had a good laugh, the Beatles departed, and the boxer turned to Lipsyte and asked: “Who were those little sissies?”

     

     
  3. This post has been removed.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    The documentary was excellent; if you didn't watch last night, there will be other times you can catch or DVR it.     1964 was such a pivotal year, it was staggering to see what our country was experiencing.

    The footage with the Beatles was (as always) fantastic.   The interaction with Muhammad Ali (nee Cassius Clay) was as good as promised.    BTW, not only was Ali stunningly handsome and graceful, but there was also a glimpse into his strength as a fighter for religious and racial freedom.   It was made abundantly clear that Ali was a cultural phenom on every level.

    Bob Dylan was featured very briefly, singing "The Times They Are a Changin" -- re: protesting --  and it made me think that's certainly one of his signature songs.  :)  

    Another interesting fact was in relation to "Dancing in the Street", sung by Martha Reeves and the Vendellas.   Even though it was written as a dance song (I also didn't know it was co-written by Marvin Gaye, but I'm sure many of you did),  the song was later seen as a protest / civil rights song when rioting began in the inner cities.  All of the cities mentioned in the song were cities that had racial tension and unrest ... I never, ever even thought about that.   Chicago, NYC, NOLA, Baltimore, DC, Philadelphi,  PA, LA.   It was flatly denied by all associated with the song that there was any political undertone or intent behind the song.    Motown did not want to be connected with politics, or have any negative attention on the label.  

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    John Coltrane released "A Love Supreme" in Dec. 1964...

    ...one of my all-time favorite jazz LPs.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    I was 28 in '64.............Wink

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rich1273. Show Rich1273's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    John Coltrane released "A Love Supreme" in Dec. 1964...

    ...one of my all-time favorite jazz LPs.

    [/QUOTE]

    YES


    That and Duke Ellington's At Newport are the two jazz albums I return to most.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    There's no doubt that it was the most pivotal, influencial and important year of the 20th century -- probably of all time.

    I was born that year.Cool

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    Well, I guess I'm the only person who watched this.  :P 

    The emphasis of this documentary was not music, BTW.  The brief segment on the Beatles was stunning nonetheless.   :)

    One last piece of featured music, however, was "A Change is Gonna Come" (Sam Cooke)  which was released in 1964 as well; that's a song that resonates.   See, 1964 was a fierce and amazing year in American history, and an outstanding year to have been born. 

     

     

     

     
  10. This post has been removed.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    Sam Cooke's murder plays into the major theme of the documentary, actually (Civil Rights movement).    Ali used the word 'pretty' to describe himself, not sure about the media back then.   To me he was one of a kind, no one like him before, no one like him since.   I have a deep respect and admiration for him.  Find him and what he represented in his time fascinating.  I used one of his most famous quotes as my signature line here (when we had that functionality ... before BDC "fixed" it ... ).  Oh well.  

    I only posted this as a PSA for anyone that was interested in watching it.   No other agenda, really.   If anyone watches it, feel free to comment.   Otherwise, back to music.  

     
  12. This post has been removed.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    In response to SlimPickensIII's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Ah, did they describe it as a murder?  I'm not sure I ever heard the final wrap on that story, for a long time it was 'self defense'.  But nothing in the reporting ever made much sense.  Most of what I knew of that came from Peter Guralnicks book 'Sweet Soul Music'.  I definitely plan on watching it, and hopefully I can get back on the topic.  The Guralnick book was about the music, and certainly covered that year and everything sandwiched around it,  but it touched on Social Issues plenty too.   If you're into that you'd love this book.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I might have mentioned this before, but I also have read 'Sweet Soul Music" by Guralnick. Also read his two part Elvis Presley biography. He's one of my favorite music writers, I think because we both love the same type of music.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Well, I guess I'm the only person who watched this.  :P 

    The emphasis of this documentary was not music, BTW.  The brief segment on the Beatles was stunning nonetheless.   :)

    One last piece of featured music, however, was "A Change is Gonna Come" (Sam Cooke)  which was released in 1964 as well; that's a song that resonates.   See, 1964 was a fierce and amazing year in American history, and an outstanding year to have been born.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Sam Cooke is one artist that I place in a special category I call transcendent. Some others I put there are Hank Williams, Sr., Duke Ellington, and of course Howlin' Wolf.

     
  15. This post has been removed.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Well, I guess I'm the only person who watched this.  :P 

    The emphasis of this documentary was not music, BTW.  The brief segment on the Beatles was stunning nonetheless.   :)

    One last piece of featured music, however, was "A Change is Gonna Come" (Sam Cooke)  which was released in 1964 as well; that's a song that resonates.   See, 1964 was a fierce and amazing year in American history, and an outstanding year to have been born.   



    Sam Cooke is one artist that I place in a special category I call transcendent. Some others I put there are Hank Williams, Sr., Duke Ellington, and of course Howlin' Wolf.

    [/QUOTE]
    The song, "A Change ..." is certainly transcendent as well, and is just as moving hearing it today; it will never get old.   We've come so far, but (still) have such a long way to go.   I did not know this song was released in 1964 until I watched the documentary.    

    I can't imagine how anyone could write about the music of any era and not put it into a social context, so the books sound good.  I've heard of Guralnick mostly b/c I know he's from Boston, and a source of local pride.    Had no idea he'd written the number of books that he has, either. 

    BTW, 'murder' was my word; I should have used homicide, as that is correct.   The homicide wasn't really investigated beyond the belief that it was self-defense ... so no one will ever know.  And even if it was self-defense, that doesn't mean he deserved to die ... very sad.   This particular era of American history is of interest to me, yes, so I'd probably like the books mentioned.    BTW, I am in a history-related profession, and my focus is 20th century history, American.  It's certainly part of the reason my "in-take" is not the same as the average person.  I'm a geek.  :)     I've had the chance to work on some interesting projects, but my specialty isn't music; therefore, I do admire Guralnick and others of his ilk out there.  :)

     

     
  17. This post has been removed.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: American Experience 1964 (on PBS)

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Well, I guess I'm the only person who watched this.  :P 

    The emphasis of this documentary was not music, BTW.  The brief segment on the Beatles was stunning nonetheless.   :)

    One last piece of featured music, however, was "A Change is Gonna Come" (Sam Cooke)  which was released in 1964 as well; that's a song that resonates.   See, 1964 was a fierce and amazing year in American history, and an outstanding year to have been born. 

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I finally watched it today and thoroughly enjoyed it. 1964 certainly was a turning point in American history. The times were a changin', indeed. LBJ's considerable contributions to this change seem to have been overshadowed by his decisions about Vietnam that in the long run proved disastrous and turned the very people against him who were benefitting from the sweeping social changes he put into play. He was an effective politician but lacked the grace and glamour of JFK, who he would always be compared to unfavorably.

    It's interesting that Goldwater planted the seeds of the conservative revolution that didn't really bloom until Reagan was elected President in 1980. If anything, Reagan sure was patient and persistent to wait so long to bring his conservative philosophy to the Oval Office. 

     

Share