Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    I was thinking, and it occurred to me that each generation of rock music fans has had one or more figures who stood out as a "voice of a generation."

    I think it's fair to say that Elvis is the undisputed "voice" of the young people in the 50's , although you could argue for Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis alongside.

    The 60's ( being the volatile political era that it was) spawned many "voices." Bob Dylan, John Lennon, James Brown, possibly Jim Morrison and throw in Jagger if you wish.

    The 70's had some powerful voices in rock also ( I would say more in quantity , possibly less in mainstream popularity). Elvis Costello, Graham Parker, Warren Zevon Jackson Browne, Neil Young, Joe Strummer and Johnny Rotten all spoke to a generation of young rock fans ( and surely I am leaving many out).

    The 80's had two prominent voices of a generation in Pop music ( Michael Jackson and Madonna ), but when I speak of "voices" , I am speaking more in terms of social and political consciousness in music. Perhaps the bigger voices may have come from a style with which I am not a fan, Rap. Afterall , I was no longer a kid in the 80's so perhaps I am not the one to list the artists who had the biggest impression on the young. I think to many Bono may have tried to fill those shoes...I don't believe he succeeded.

    The 90's voice was clearly Kurt Cobain. He became the main figure ( possibly by dying, but maybe not) in the forefront of a new movement of Rock.

    We have left one decade and are firmly entrenched in another ( in the 2000's) and I am not seeing a "voice" for the young Rock fan. Oh sure, some of the old ones are still around, but they don't speak to a generation of young people like a John Lennon or a Dylan spoke to us. 

    Any comments?

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from newman09. Show newman09's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    The entertainment industry is so fractured and consumer interest is now so broad because of that, it makes it almost impossible to find just one voice to define a generation.

    The last dozen or so years is so vastly different than any other time in Rock/Pop history. The music industry takeover of who, when and what we hear takes a good amount of blame, but the biggest reason and difference from the 50's, 60's, 70's, 80's and even 90's is the internet. 

    Where, and how we get our music now has changed so much from the earlier decades. Finding those one or two voice's that a consensus can agree on and say they define the masses will truly be more of an opinion, where it was previously pretty easy to point out. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a

    Really good question Zillagod.  If your looking for an Elvis, Lennon, or Dylan today, you probably won't find one. However, people will always gravitate to those artists they can associate with no matter when the era. Different voices speak to different folks. Lady Gaga appeals to many today who feel slighted and different, not unlike say Johhny Rotten. Screaming girls associate with Justin Beiber because he is a teen idol and has good looks, not unlike Elvis. I guess it is based on one's taste.

    The world has changed so much in the last 50 years, and so has folks attention span. Technology is mostly blame, and there are just so many other entertainment options available, that for one person to be the voice of anything for an extended period of time, is unlikely, but not impossible. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from leafswin27. Show leafswin27's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    I think some might say Thom Yorke . I am not a huge fan but I know a lot might utter hsi name..
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]I think some might say Thom Yorke . I am not a huge fan but I know a lot might utter hsi name..
    Posted by leafswin27[/QUOTE]

    +1
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    Have to agree with leaf on this as far as Yorke is concerned in the Rock community, although I haven't heard him speak out much outside of his music. And the reality is that in today's world, Rap and Hip-Hop are major communication hubs, therefore Jay-Z, Beyonce and several others may be considered the voice of their generation. Afterall, Hip-Hop & rap has crossed over more into the "white community", then Rock has into the "Black community." And if we add in Latin music, then there are other voices to be heard.

    I never considered Elvis or any of the other 50's artists to be the voice of their generation. They were strictly music. DJ Allan Freed might be more of the voice of the 50's generation. The 60's and 70's were unlike any other decades because of the internal strife that was going on in our country. So individuals like Dylan, Guthrie, Lennon and a few others went outside the music world to be heard. And of course you had David Crosby, Joan Baez and so many others who spoke out so defiantly against the war. MJ and Madonna were the voices for much of the 80's pop generation, but not always in a good way. And for the most part, the 80's were a calm time, at least on this side of the Atlantic. The only voice Cobain was good for was for pathetic souls who didn't have the cajones to deal with reality. I will never give him credit for anything even if his lyrics conveyed a certain level of angst for his generation. Orphaning one's only child is f'n greedy.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    It is a good question.

    But I think it depends on how much one views rock music as a cultural force.  It's still there but has been so incorporated into the mainstream culture as to be not as significant.

    Yorke is hardly new on the scene, so I don't know how much he speaks for today's generation.  Dave Grohl?  Eddie Vedder? Again, more 90s-era stars.

    It may be more genre-specific, i.e., certain country or hip-hop stars.  Jay-Z is pretty highly considered.  Eminem, maybe....

    Do the Kardashians count?  They seem to be everywhere at once.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]Have to agree with leaf on this as far as Yorke is concerned in the Rock community, although I haven't heard him speak out much outside of his music. And the reality is that in today's world, Rap and Hip-Hop are major communication hubs, therefore Jay-Z, Beyonce and several others may be considered the voice of their generation. Afterall, Hip-Hop & rap has crossed over more into the "white community", then Rock has into the "Black community." And if we add in Latin music, then there are other voices to be heard. I never considered Elvis or any of the other 50's artists to be the voice of their generation. They were strictly music. DJ Allan Freed might be more of the voice of the 50's generation. The 60's and 70's were unlike any other decades because of the internal strife that was going on in our country. So individuals like Dylan, Guthrie, Lennon and a few others went outside the music world to be heard. And of course you had David Crosby, Joan Baez and so many others who spoke out so defiantly against the war. MJ and Madonna were the voices for much of the 80's pop generation, but not always in a good way. And for the most part, the 80's were a calm time, at least on this side of the Atlantic. The only voice Cobain was good for was for pathetic souls who didn't have the cajones to deal with reality. I will never give him credit for anything even if his lyrics conveyed a certain level of angst for his generation. Orphaning one's only child is f'n greedy.
    Posted by jesseyeric[/QUOTE]

    I'd say that the voice of the aughts to at least a certain demographic was Thom Yorke...though he really started on that path in '97.

    he is often cryptic, sometimes unintelligable...but there is always a message.

    as for outside of his music, he is very vocal about reducing carbon emissions, and is sort of leading the charge in europe as far as public figures go.  their merchandise is made out of eco-friendly materials, and the proceeds go towards the cause.  it's a very big deal to them, especially eco-friendly touring.

    www.waste.uk.com/


    as far as kurt, he is undoubtedly the 90's voice...whether or not you respect it is another thing.  we're talking about speaking to the generation, which is vague, but having the youth of said generation identify with your lyrics and message meets that criteria.  Even if not to the extent that mr. cobain presented them.

    and I know that you don't like him and will never give him credit for anything, Jessey, but being the voice of a generation doesn't necessarily deserve any credit.  it's not always a good thing.

    Eminem certainly counts.  That man has a lot to say, and not everyone disagrees (as with cobain) and some condemn.  Seems the same with every voice of previous generations, eh?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]It is a good question. But I think it depends on how much one views rock music as a cultural force.  It's still there but has been so incorporated into the mainstream culture as to be not as significant. Yorke is hardly new on the scene, so I don't know how much he speaks for today's generation.  Dave Grohl?  Eddie Vedder? Again, more 90s-era stars. It may be more genre-specific, i.e., certain country or hip-hop stars.  Jay-Z is pretty highly considered.  Eminem, maybe.... Do the Kardashians count?  They seem to be everywhere at once.
    Posted by MattyScornD[/QUOTE]

    If the Kardashians count as "voices" for a generation, then this generation has some real issues. However, as they are mainly gossip mag and Hollywood trash news personalities, they cannot be included as they have virtually nothing to do with music.

    I think you all have some great input here, but I really tend to go with newman's view. To many entertainment outlets exist  today and the rock star doesn't impact the youth in this time period as a rock start impacted rock in the 50's, 60's and 70's. Since the 80's , we have seen a decline in "larger than life" superstars of rock. I mean MTV brought quantity and very little true quality....I liked Loverboy, Duran Duran and Devo, but we are not talking BIG as in Elvis or Beatles BIG here. These artists were unique and entertaining but did not have the mania surrounding Beatles, Elvis, Dylan, Stones,Springsteen, Bowie or even Alice Cooper.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnjoyEverySandwich. Show EnjoyEverySandwich's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?



    I think Justin Beiber resonates with kids because he was just a kid who posted his stuff on youtube and got discovered via word of mouth.  It's the old if-he-can-do-it-there's-hope-for-me thing.  And that's also a bit why he's been disparaged since, I think -- hey, I could make better music that that guy!  Why did he get so lucky?

    I'm not a fan of his, I just don't think his appeal is actually based (or at least originally based) on his looks.




     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    If the aughts had a voice, I think it was the World Trade Towers on 9/11.

    I think that event caused total damage to the psyche of the country.  And it was bookended by the financial collapse at the end of 2009, with war in the middle.  (I'm not trying to make a political statement or trying to place blame on anyone.)

    What a terrible, terrible decade. I'm going on 50 years old and barely remember 60s.  But it seems like the aughts were the exact opposite of the 60s in the sense that back then, people were finding their voice.  But during the last decade, the wind seems to have gotten knocked out of people.  Or maybe people are just angry; too angry to do anything but rage.  Maybe in this decade people will fine their voice again.  But in any event, the aughts was the worst decade of my lifetime.

    I think coming out of that decade is a pick up in alt country/folk/rock.  I'm not sure what the proper name for the sound, but it includes the Black Keys, Wilco, etc.  Those groups were around in the aughts, but I think they sound is starting to increase in popularity.  It's interesting in the sense that it seems to be a more mellow sound.  More earnest.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    This is one of those discussions that was meant to take place in person  (No, Zilla, I did not mean prison  HA HA)  :D   Yeah, I'm with the camp that agrees that the internet and technology has changed the music industry dramatically, has made music so accessible, so fractured and so individualized, having a "voice" is almost a concept of a long gone era.  Just doesn't happen the same way, if at all.  

    The focus is just not on "us" or "we" -- it's on "I" and "me".  You see what I mean?

    I'm surprised no one said Lady GaGa.  Or perhaps not.   

    I'm definitely down with the nineties.  Lots of music spoke to me, and continues to speak to me from that era, and I am continuing to discover more every day, in large part due to this forum.   I am often astonished that there are bands that are about 20 years into their existence, and I either still love them, or am just discovering them.  That was a rich decade for music.  

    As far as voice -- Okay to mention JK Rowling, too?   Talk about a uniting force in the arts.  Have to give her props. 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    I can't really answer this question properly.  My focus is more on looking out for who is 'carrying the torch' for my own beloved rock music.  Who is leading the way in forging ahead with music in the rock realm that is good and interesting and not necessarily commercial.  In that regard I would agree with the nominations for Thom Yorke and Eddie Vedder and probably add Jack White.  
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]If the aughts had a voice, I think it was the World Trade Towers on 9/11. I think that event caused total damage to the psyche of the country.  And it was bookended by the financial collapse at the end of 2009, with war in the middle.  (I'm not trying to make a political statement or trying to place blame on anyone.) What a terrible, terrible decade. I'm going on 50 years old and barely remember 60s.  But it seems like the aughts were the exact opposite of the 60s in the sense that back then, people were finding their voice.  But during the last decade, the wind seems to have gotten knocked out of people.  Or maybe people are just angry; too angry to do anything but rage.  Maybe in this decade people will fine their voice again.  But in any event, the aughts was the worst decade of my lifetime. I think coming out of that decade is a pick up in alt country/folk/rock.  I'm not sure what the proper name for the sound, but it includes the Black Keys, Wilco, etc.  Those groups were around in the aughts, but I think they sound is starting to increase in popularity.  It's interesting in the sense that it seems to be a more mellow sound.  More earnest.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    Well, this an excellent post and I understand your point completely.

    Since I am a little bit older than you , I have some very vivid and lasting memories of the 1960's. I will never forget the race riots, the Kennedy assassinations or the MLK assassination. I will never forget the appearances of the Beatles, the Stones , Ray Charles and other legendary figures on Ed Sullivan Show.I will never forget the images from Vietnam. I will never forget the moon landing in 1969 ( real or staged in Nevada...who really knows? , but unforgettable anyway). As a child , I was unaware of many historic events ( like Woodstock, the Democratic Convention in Chicago, the Manson Family murders) until they became immortalized in documentries and books....then became extremely interested in them.

    Of course, the 70's had Watergate, Three Mile Island and the Vietnam War was still going on...scary stuff. The 80's were likely the least terrifying decade of my life...perhaps that decade didn't "need" a voice. The 90's brought the Gulf War, increases in terrorism, and White House sex scandal.

    Agreed the 9/11 attacks are a horrific stain on our memories. The wars in Afgahnastan and Iraq, a sad chapter in out history, and the economic crisis ( which lingers and will continue to) is a product mainly of the greed that has overtaken our celebs,banks, corporations, politicians and powerbrokers.

    Perhaps with all the turmoil in our society today, what we need is a powerful voice in music. We need a John Lennon right now as much as we needed a passionate leader to bring the attention of the young people to our many social and political problems.

    Without Jim Morrison, Dylan, Lennon, The Clash and the Sex Pistols bringing attention to the ills of society in their music, I don't know if I would have been as aware of such things. I don't know if I would start researching and reading about our social and political issues.

    I don't mean to say that a voice in music would solve any problems, but making young people aware of the world around them is essential. I see too many young people immersed in Facebook and texting, Reality shows and sports. Our future generations seem headed for a legacy of apathy...and this seems just alright with the people in power who , if you ask me, are counting on continued apathy from the youth. I am more aware because of the voices in music during my youth.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world? : Well, this an excellent post and I understand your point completely. Since I am a little bit older than you , I have some very vivid and lasting memories of the 1960's. I will never forget the race riots, the Kennedy assassinations or the MLK assassinations. I will never forget the appearances of the Beatles, the Stones , Ray Charles and other legendary figures on Ed Sullivan Show.I will never forget the images from Vietnam. I will never forget the moon landing in 1969 ( real or staged in Nevada...who really knows? , but unforgettable anyway). As a child , I was unaware of many historic events ( like Woodstock, the Democratic Convention in Chicago, the Manson Family murders) until they became immortalized in documentries and books....then became extremely interested in them. Of course, the 70's had Watergate and the Vietnam War was still going on...scary stuff. The 80's were likely the least terrifying decade of my life...perhaps that decade didn't "need" a voice. The 90's brought the Gulf War, increases in terrorism, and White House sex scandal. Agreed the 9/11 attacks are a horrific stain on our memories. The wars in Afgahnastan and Iraq, a sad chapter in out history, and the economic crisis ( which lingers and will continue to) is a product mainly of the greed that has overtaken our celebs,banks, corporations, politicians and powerbrokers. Perhaps with all the turmoil in our society today, what we need is a powerful voice in music. We need a John Lennon right now as much as we needed a passionate leader to bring the attention of the young people to our many social and political problems. Without Jim Morrison, Dylan, Lennon, The Clash and the Sex Pistols bringing attention to the ills of society in their music, I don't know if I would have been as aware of such things. I don't know if I would start researching and reading about our social and political issues. I don't mean to say that a voice in music would solve any problems, but making young people aware of the world around them is essential. I see too many young people immersed in Facebook and texting, Reality shows and sports. Our future generations seem headed for a legacy of apathy...and this seems just alright with the people in power who , if you ask me, are counting on continued apathy from the youth. I am more aware because of the voices in music during my youth.
    Posted by ZILLAGOD[/QUOTE]

    i don't think today's youth are apathetic at all. I think that they have their voice in the White House in the person of Barack Obama. Today's youth are very much aware of environmental issues, corporate corruption, racial issues, and dead end wars. I remember much more apathy when I was in high school during the post-Vietnam era. Kids back then only cared about partying and getting laid. Pot went from being a mind expanding drug to a party drug. Sexual freedom went from being a sign of liberation to a self-centered way to use others for personal pleasure. I was not impressed at all with my fellow youth during the mid to late 70's. I am much more impressed with the youth today as far as their enthusiasm and greater lack of prejudices. Youth on social networks are in fact more and more becoming catalysts for social and political change. Dig a little deeper and you'll see that the days of apathy are over.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world? : i don't think today's youth are apathetic at all. I think that they have their voice in the White House in the person of Barack Obama. Today's youth are very much aware of environmental issues, corporate corruption, racial issues, and dead end wars. I remember much more apathy when I was in high school during the post-Vietnam era. Kids back then only cared about partying and getting laid. Pot went from being a mind expanding drug to a party drug. Sexual freedom went from being a sign of liberation to a self-centered way to use others for personal pleasure. I was not impressed at all with my fellow youth during the mid to late 70's. I am much more impressed with the youth today as far as their enthusiasm and greater lack of prejudices. Youth on social networks are in fact more and more becoming catalysts for social and political change. Dig a little deeper and you'll see that the days of apathy are over.
    Posted by devildavid[/QUOTE]

    God, I hope you are right.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    I propose Bono.  He has tons to say about how the world is and how the world could be better, yet a lot of you have posted in here that you find his politics to be both annoying and self serving.  He has attempted to wake people up about many causes which he feels are unjust and wrong. 

    He is probably too old to be considered a member of today's generation, but you have got to give him credit for at least trying.  I have felt that he has been the voice of a generation that really has nothing to say.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from jesseyeric. Show jesseyeric's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]I propose Bono.  He has tons to say about how the world is and how the world could be better, yet a lot of you have posted in here that you find his politics to be both annoying and self serving.  He has attempted to wake people up about many causes which he feels are unjust and wrong.  He is probably too old to be considered a member of today's generation, but you have got to give him credit for at least trying.  I have felt that he has been the voice of a generation that really has nothing to say.
    Posted by jkjband[/QUOTE]

    Forgot all about Bono. In 1980, I thought he was the new Townsend. 30 years later, I wish he would just shut up. But I have to give credit where it is due.

    PH - it is not my dislike for Cobain as a musician; it is my total disdain for his actions as a father. John Lennon was my idol, but his actions with Julian were horrible. At least he tried to do the right thing in those last few years. Cobain didn't think it was even worth trying. So as far as I am concerned, what kind of message did he put out there for his generation? If you feel defeated, accept it and off yourself. Not a good message.

    I am reminded of the Mixed Tape thread and  Leafswin comment about his daughter. I am sorry that Cobain didn't understand that feeling.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Yoshimi25. Show Yoshimi25's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    Well, there's always Green Day or Linkin Park.  Or My Chemical Romance.  Though they might be more 90s than Oughts. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from phsmith8. Show phsmith8's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    i was thinking of this thread when i was driving home the other night, and something occured to me...in the 60's and 70's with the aforementioned voices of those generations, they were very vocal about political and social things, and a lot of people got behind them.  but they were all centered on ideas, and all you had to do to agree was to say yeah, that'd be great!  they should do that!

    ...whereas someone like thom yorke who is pushing for reduced carbon emissions and environmental awareness is easy to agree with, yet you actually have to DO something to support the cause and help out.  these days people don't like doing things, especially when it means altering their comfortable, convenient way of life. 

    i think this is one of the main reasons that people roll their eyes when they hear about this sort of activism from the likes of yorke and mr. hewson, as opposed to the social awareness that was a result of people like dylan and lennon.

    although bono can be insufferable at times (i don't want to bring up the versace ad again, but...), at least radiohead's merch is made from recycled materials and are a "green touring" band, and don't shove it down your throats. 

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9ckoXNi5vs

    thoughts?

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world? : i don't think today's youth are apathetic at all. I think that they have their voice in the White House in the person of Barack Obama. Today's youth are very much aware of environmental issues, corporate corruption, racial issues, and dead end wars. I remember much more apathy when I was in high school during the post-Vietnam era. Kids back then only cared about partying and getting laid. Pot went from being a mind expanding drug to a party drug. Sexual freedom went from being a sign of liberation to a self-centered way to use others for personal pleasure. I was not impressed at all with my fellow youth during the mid to late 70's. I am much more impressed with the youth today as far as their enthusiasm and greater lack of prejudices. Youth on social networks are in fact more and more becoming catalysts for social and political change. Dig a little deeper and you'll see that the days of apathy are over.
    Posted by devildavid[/QUOTE]

    I don't know, Dave.

    When I first read this thread I spent some time thinking about the difference between people whose voice finds its way into the social consciousness on the strength of its message and the charisma of the artist and people who simply use their celebrity to annoy us with their own personal agendae

    (Sometimes I think Zillagod brings up Bono every once in a while just to see what I'll say Wink )

    But when I read your post I got to thinking about what I remembered about the late '60s and early '70s -- the war, specifically -- and how we've still got young people being blown up in some ragged, inconsequential backwater for no good reason that I can see, and yet the "protesters" here at home -- this ridiculous "Occupy Wall Street" crowd -- are out creating a nuisance because they want things like their student debt forgiven and a guaranteed living wage, whether or not they deign to hold a job and for the government to essentially wipe their indolent butts for them from cradle to grave.

    Maybe you're right when you say the apathy is over, but the self-interest that disgusted you all those years ago appears to be quite alive and well from where I'm sitting.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world? : I don't know, Dave. When I first read this thread I spent some time thinking about the difference between people whose voice finds its way into the social consciousness on the strength of its message and the charisma of the artist and people who simply use their celebrity to annoy us with their own personal agendae (Sometimes I think Zillagod brings up Bono every once in a while just to see what I'll say ) But when I read your post I got to thinking about what I remembered about the late '60s and early '70s -- the war, specifically -- and how we've still got young people being blown up in some ragged, inconsequential backwater for no good reason that I can see, and yet the "protesters" here at home -- this ridiculous "Occupy Wall Street" crowd -- are out creating a nuisance because they want things like their student debt forgiven and a guaranteed living wage, whether or not they deign to hold a job and for the government to essentially wipe their indolent butts for them from cradle to grave. Maybe you're right when you say the apathy is over, but the self-interest that disgusted you all those years ago appears to be quite alive and well from where I'm sitting.
    Posted by p-mike[/QUOTE]

    I am guilty to some degree of being a bit mischievous in these matters.

    But, I would have to share blame with jesseyeric , because he does this to me with Cheap Trick.

    One strange thing about this forum is that I tend to remember the artists that others like and dislike. Just like on the Sox forums where you identify the posters by the players, GMs  and managers they either love or despise.

    Remembering these things seems important for some reason....probably so I can zing unsuspecting posters as often as possible. Breaks the monotony.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from jkjband. Show jkjband's posts

    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    The protest over the war in the 60s and early 70s hit home for more people because of the draft.  If you were a male between 18 -24 every year they would hold a lottery and if you were lucky enough to be a low number odds were you were going to Vietnam (Like it or not) Yeah there were some ways to get out of it college, grad school, but if you didn't have the bucks to go you were going to get a different kind of education.  I think that brought a larger sense of urgency in people's protest about the war.

    As for the Occupy movement, Their message was that the playing field is tilted towards big bucks having the government in it's back pocket.  I think that message got lost on a lot of people by the lack of leadership and the coverage which they received from the media.  Big banks got bailed out by the little guy and then turned around and dropped a large turd on the people who just saved them. 


    I work in some very harsh conditions at times work my butt off for that matter and I have no problem whatsoever with the people who were a part of that movement. I say more power to them.
     
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    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    I want a re-count.  :D

    But you know what, really?  I think it's too soon to ask this question about the aughts.  We don't have enough perspective.   And we don't even know the appropriate criteria to apply, or do we?  If we're applying the same criteria that was used to select the voice of the 60's on forward (anti-war, anti-authority, socio-economic strife, political unrest)   -- then maybe the answer is that the music industry and the artists in it chose a different path for music in the past decade, and didn't really want to develop music to respond to that criteria.  

    That's not something to criticize.  That's a sign of the times.   What's wrong with music being your escape from all that "real world" strife?   That's a statement in itself.   And it doesn't mean the current generation doesn't care or is apathetic, either.  That's not a fair statement to make.    Trending in music doesn't always follow along the same criteria that was used 50 years ago, and we need to remember that.   

    Lastly, 10 years does not a generation make.  Sorry to pick a nit, but dat's the truth.  So we're talking about the voice of a decade ... not a generation. You know, "talking 'bout my generation ...."   :P   
     
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    Re: Does this generation have a "voice" in the music world?

    There is a large segment of music that is and always has been an "escape from real world strife." And yoga, I agree that this type music is very healthy for the mind and helps us keep our sanity. But, not many artists in the sphere of Rock take a complete "hands off" view when it comes to social and political commentary in their music. Jackson Browne, Neil Young, Rush, Black Sabbath , Pink Floyd, Beatles, the Who and just about every other significant Rock act has recorded songs of "real world" social or political views.

    I think the desire of the public and media to have music artists speak out on certain issues goes back to the Folk movement , which in the 60's ,is where a lot of the anti-war rhetoric began. Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger, Arlo Guthrie , Country Joe McDonald, are some of the Folk singers who began incorporating anti- war sentiment into their music. This quickly spread to the Psychedlic 60's rock bands as outdoors festivals turned into music/protest rallies.

    It was during this time that many people started viewing Rock stars as "heroes" and we all want to follow our heroes and we want them to lead. Therefore words from the mouths of John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Eric Burden, Jim Morrison, Pete Townsend, Mick Jagger, Ray Davies, Grace Slick, Jerry Garcia and all the others started to be important. These were the "leaders of the youth movement" , just like the women's movement and the African Americans had their leaders...young people wanted their "voice." And they found it in Rock stars too willing to speak out on current events (But, also egged on by the media in interviews....i.e., the John Lennon "bigger than Jesus" statement).

    I think perhaps this is one of the most important changes that happened in popular music in the 60's. We started "expecting" political and social opinions from our "heroes" , from Lennon, Dylan (especially) , Garcia, Slick , the Clash, the Sex Pistols, U2 ( sorry to bring them up again, p-mike!).

    Also , I would like to add a related thought, which ties into the thread by yoga about the Scorpions: One of the greatest anti-war songs I have ever heard was "Crossfire" by the Scorpions ( on the 'Love At First Sting' LP). The use of military style drumming really works great in this song.
     

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