Music sampling: Hit or miss?

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    Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    Music sampling is nothing new, but it's a trend that has become increasingly widespread over (at least) the past 20 years.   Please add or correct me, if that  timeframe is somewhat off the mark.  The increase in sampling is at least in part due to the popularity and emergence of sampling in hip hop music.   

    Sampling also seems to be more sophisticated, due to more experimentation and improved computer software that has enhanced the process.  There are a host of issues, both legal and creative, that complicate the art of sampling.   Creatively, there are detractors that say sampling is neither creative nor innovative, while others (and I'm one of them) find it innovative to the extreme (of course, depending on the fusion of the songs).   

    Huge and varied topic, I realize.   I heard an old Tupac track that I think is brilliant, that I hadn't heard in a while; hence, the thread.  Rubbish to you, perhaps, but it's a classic:

    2pac, "Changes":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uS4CvCGFyqc

    How do you feel about sampling in general?  Any specific tracks that have sent you over the edge?  (take that any way you want ...)

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

     

     

     


    Music sampling is a legal minefield and headache imo.  Many artists will tell you that sampling is nothing more than a lazy, blatant ripoff of another arists creation. Others will say it's a great way to get their music heard, or in front of a new generation of buyers as long as the money is good. What I find funny, is that we as consumers of music think nothing of downloading a song from a music sharing website (not Itunes) without getting the permission of the artist or record label. Artists on the other hand have to get permission to sample music in their songs, otherwise it is copyright infrigment. Just ask Vanilla Ice who ripped off Queens Under Pressure and ridculously tried to prove otherwise.

    Sampling works best imo when you combine two totally different elements, era's or styles of music such as Run DMC's Walk This Way and NAS's ina-gadda-da-vida.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    I think one of the most creative and 'fun' uses of sampling was Robert Plant's 'Tall Cool One', which sampled a bunch of Zeppelin songs.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I think one of the most creative and 'fun' uses of sampling was Robert Plant's 'Tall Cool One', which sampled a bunch of Zeppelin songs.



    Beastie Boys have sampled Led Zep multiple times...the best IMO being "The Ocean" on "She's Crafty" and "When The Levee Breaks" on "Rhymin' & Stealin'".

    Bonus points if you can name who plays guitar (not sampled) on "No Sleep 'Til Brooklyn"....

    And as we've noted before, Billy Squier's "The Big Beat" is one of the most sampled rock tunes ever, most notably on Jay-Z's "99 Problems".

     

    Some of my favorite rock-to-rap samples:

    Lou Reed's "Walk On The Wild Side" on A Tribe Called Quest's "Can I Kick It?" (which also samples Ian Dury, Hot Chocolate, and Prokofiev!)

    The Beatles' "A Day In The Life" & "Getting Better" on Public Enemy's "Who Stole The Soul?"

    Jimi Hendrix' "Little Miss Lover" on ATCQ's "Scenario"

    Zep's "The Crunge" and JOhnny Cash's "Five Feet HIgh And Rising" on De La Soul's "The Magic Number".

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to polar123's comment:

    Music sampling is a legal minefield and headache imo.  Many artists will tell you that sampling is nothing more than a lazy, blatant ripoff of another arists creation. Others will say it's a great way to get their music heard, or in front of a new generation of buyers as long as the money is good. What I find funny, is that we as consumers of music think nothing of downloading a song from a music sharing website (not Itunes) without getting the permission of the artist or record label. Artists on the other hand have to get permission to sample music in their songs, otherwise it is copyright infrigment. Just ask Vanilla Ice who ripped off Queens Under Pressure and ridculously tried to prove otherwise.

    Sampling works best imo when you combine two totally different elements, era's or styles of music such as Run DMC's Walk This Way and NAS's ina-gadda-da-vida.



    RE: legal issues.  The mistakes, and/or deliberate attempts at ripoffs have been made, and anyone that violates or does an end run now, should be penalized.   Those instances probably occur less often now.   

    I am a big fan of sampling, and see it as an art unto itself.  The more offbeat the better.   What a coincidence re: mentioning copyright infringement, because one of the early examples I've always loved is Run DMC's "Can't Touch This" that samples the opening riffs from "Superfreak" (Rick James). Talk about coincidences:  I just looked it up while I was here, and sure enough, Rick James was going to sue Hammer for the use of the riffs without his permission.   hahaha.   Guess how they worked it out?   They settled out of court, and Hammer made James the co-composer, thereby allowing James to partake in the millions of dollars the record was raking in.    Ha!!   Not a bad outcome for James on that one.   =) 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    I have mixed feelings about sampling. Sometimes I think it is too easy to sample the catchiest part of someone else's song without ripping off the real hook of the song. I have enjoyed some early Hip-Hop and then later on heard the hooks in the original songs and thought, that's the reason I really like this song. I'm more impressed by those who create their own hooks, and not ride off other's.





    "Hold it fellows, that don't move me. Let's get real, real gone for a change."

    -Elvis Presley

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    Yesterday at Shaws Supermarket they had "sample" of their pizza at the deli counter.

    I sampled one piece. It was good.

    Mick Jones' band ( after the Clash) , Big Audio Dynamite, used sampling ( a Who song, I think it was 'Can't Explain') in one of their songs...it was alright, but I had already tried it years earlier on 'Meaty, Beaty , Big And Bouncy'...the Who LP of their early hits.

    So the question is, why "sample" something you already know?...and is it really a "sample?' , you pay for it, so it is not a "free sample."

    I think perhaps, "snippet" would be a better word for this.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to devildavid's comment:

    I have mixed feelings about sampling. Sometimes I think it is too easy to sample the catchiest part of someone else's song without ripping off the real hook of the song. I have enjoyed some early Hip-Hop and then later on heard the hooks in the original songs and thought, that's the reason I really like this song. I'm more impressed by those who create their own hooks, and not ride off other's.





    "Hold it fellows, that don't move me. Let's get real, real gone for a change."

    -Elvis Presley



    It's a very thin line to think of it as a ripoff vs. using or employing a song as a backing track; some consider sampling akin to a musical instrument, from that standpoint.    

    Yet, as much as I am a fan of sampling, I don't disagree, in the overall creativity department; it's in a different league from original songwriting.   It's a different method, and in context, sampling has its own set of merits.   

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:

    Yesterday at Shaws Supermarket they had "sample" of their pizza at the deli counter.

    I sampled one piece. It was good.

    Mick Jones' band ( after the Clash) , Big Audio Dynamite, used sampling ( a Who song, I think it was 'Can't Explain') in one of their songs...it was alright, but I had already tried it years earlier on 'Meaty, Beaty , Big And Bouncy'...the Who LP of their early hits.

    So the question is, why "sample" something you already know?...and is it really a "sample?' , you pay for it, so it is not a "free sample."

    I think perhaps, "snippet" would be a better word for this.

    "The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you are still a rat."- Lily Tomlin



    As for food sampling, please only partake when the food is "wrapped."  Laughing 
    In the annals of the gross (and dumb) things people do,  I saw a woman take a cookie out of a sample bowl in Whole Foods, take a whiff, and PUT IT BACK INTO THE BOWL; that pretty much made me sick to my stomach.  Don't worry, I said something to her: "Are you serious?  You couldn't throw it out?"  I might have even said "Are you crazy" I can't remember, I just remember being outraged.   Never again ... 

    As for music sampling, you might know the song being sampled, but think of all the younger listeners who don't know it.   Lots of people who are listening to hip hop music are getting a nice introduction to some songs they've never heard, and may never have heard, were it not for the sampling.    

    As for changing the musical descriptor to "snippets" or "snippeting" -- uh, good luck with that.   All I can think of is Lemony SniCKet.   Are you a fan?  =)

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    I think MC Hammer did "Can't Touch This"...

    ...not Run-DMC.

     

    FWIW, I think samples expose would-be rappers to other sounds and legacy artists they might otherwise have ignored.  They also allow rappers/producers a sonic palette with which to associate their own creations, whether it be jazz, soul, r&b, funk, rock, etc.

    Even better - and just like other 'musicians' - they get to pay tribute to their influences and sample other rap songs...again, like Jay-Z does on "99 Problems" (Ice-T).

    To me, the concept is no different than The Byrds releasing a cover of a Dylan tune contemporaneously with the original.

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from gerbs. Show gerbs's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    I really do try to keep an open mind, and will try to check out particularly Matty's suggestions.  The MC Hammer was ok by me as are what samples I've heard from Eminem, but the Vanilla Ice cr*p and especially Kid Rock's desecration of Zevon and Skynyrd leave me wary of the practice.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to gerbs' comment:

    I really do try to keep an open mind, and will try to check out particularly Matty's suggestions.  The MC Hammer was ok by me as are what samples I've heard from Eminem, but the Vanilla Ice cr*p and especially Kid Rock's desecration of Zevon and Skynyrd leave me wary of the practice.



    Not sure you need an open mind to like sampling, nor are you devoid of one if don't.   You may like a sampled song here or there, but overall, if it's meh to you, so be it.   Did you listen to the youtube link I put in the OP?   Tupac samples Bruce Hornsby's "The Way it Is"  -- to me, the rapping and the song track fit together like they were made for each other.  

    Madonna's "Jump" is a tribute to the Pet Shop Boys' "West End Girls" which may be slightly off direct sampling, but it's similar, and one of her songs that I quite like, directly related to the PSB influence.

    "Empire State of Mind" by Jay-Z, with vocals by Alicia Keys, samples an old song, "Love on a Two Way Street", that plays throughout the song.   I didn't even realize this until it was pointed out to me, but I loved the song as of the first time I ever heard it.   

    Now this is something I don't care for and might be what leaves many feeling cold with regard to sampling.  Here's Frank Ocean sampling a MGMT song, and you have to ask yourself why he bothered. It's a very well known song.  Ocean totally steals the song, not just the opening riffs. 

    Original MGMT    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbkv5xOLvnA

    Frank Ocean's sampled crap* version   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTIaZSWZxtM

    *crap can be spelled out =)

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Harvey-Wallbanger's comment:

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    Music sampling is nothing new, but it's a trend that has become increasingly widespread over (at least) the past 20 years.   Please add or correct me, if that  timeframe is somewhat off the mark.  The increase in sampling is at least in part due to the popularity and emergence of sampling in hip hop music.   

    Sampling also seems to be more sophisticated, due to more experimentation and improved computer software that has enhanced the process.  There are a host of issues, both legal and creative, that complicate the art of sampling.   Creatively, there are detractors that say sampling is neither creative nor innovative, while others (and I'm one of them) find it innovative to the extreme (of course, depending on the fusion of the songs).   

    Huge and varied topic, I realize.   I heard an old Tupac track that I think is brilliant, that I hadn't heard in a while; hence, the thread.  Rubbish to you, perhaps, but it's a classic:

    2pac, "Changes":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uS4CvCGFyqc

    How do you feel about sampling in general?  Any specific tracks that have sent you over the edge?  (take that any way you want ...)

     



    I think it's embarrassing, personally. You might as well become a DJ at that point.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Well, there are lots of EDM DJs at this point.   That's exactly what they do.   They even have entire "music" festivals for them.    

    You'd probably consider going to one a form of torture.   Laughing

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    I think MC Hammer did "Can't Touch This"...

    ...not Run-DMC.

     

    FWIW, I think samples expose would-be rappers to other sounds and legacy artists they might otherwise have ignored.  They also allow rappers/producers a sonic palette with which to associate their own creations, whether it be jazz, soul, r&b, funk, rock, etc.

    Even better - and just like other 'musicians' - they get to pay tribute to their influences and sample other rap songs...again, like Jay-Z does on "99 Problems" (Ice-T).

    To me, the concept is no different than The Byrds releasing a cover of a Dylan tune contemporaneously with the original.

     

    I must have been looking at Polar's post.  Had Hammer in one place, Run DMC in another.   oops.   Been posting at all weird hours lately.   

    You sound more idealistic than I tend to be re: paying homage, although many artists do so when selecting songs to sample, others simply find a song they want to borrow because it will work for them.  All of them are not in it to pay tribute; that, or I am too cynical to believe otherwise.  =)

    After this thread, in fact, I wonder if I haven't been critical enough.  I don't question the music I like, but the practice of sampling is very questionable, and variable.  

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from polar123. Show polar123's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    cancelled.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to gerbs' comment:

    I really do try to keep an open mind, and will try to check out particularly Matty's suggestions.  The MC Hammer was ok by me as are what samples I've heard from Eminem, but the Vanilla Ice cr*p and especially Kid Rock's desecration of Zevon and Skynyrd leave me wary of the practice.



    Speaking of MC Hammer, it's amazing how much mileage the guy got out of that annoying, repetitive song 'Can't Touch This.'

    I was watching something on T.V. last night ( I think it was a rerun of The Andy Griffith Show) and there was a commercial for Eggo Waffles , they used the 'Can't Touch This' song in the ad. Every so often when you have forgotten about it, it will crop up again in a commercial, a comedy act or maybe a movie.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    As far as the legal/ethical issues are concerned, I have no problem with sampling as long as the original artists are properly credited, or paid, as the case may be.  Just keep it above board, folks.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    I think MC Hammer did "Can't Touch This"...

    ...not Run-DMC.

     

    FWIW, I think samples expose would-be rappers to other sounds and legacy artists they might otherwise have ignored.  They also allow rappers/producers a sonic palette with which to associate their own creations, whether it be jazz, soul, r&b, funk, rock, etc.

    Even better - and just like other 'musicians' - they get to pay tribute to their influences and sample other rap songs...again, like Jay-Z does on "99 Problems" (Ice-T).

    To me, the concept is no different than The Byrds releasing a cover of a Dylan tune contemporaneously with the original.

     

     

    I must have been looking at Polar's post.  Had Hammer in one place, Run DMC in another.   oops.   Been posting at all weird hours lately.   

    You sound more idealistic than I tend to be re: paying homage, although many artists do so when selecting songs to sample, others simply find a song they want to borrow because it will work for them.  All of them are not in it to pay tribute; that, or I am too cynical to believe otherwise.  =)

    After this thread, in fact, I wonder if I haven't been critical enough.  I don't question the music I like, but the practice of sampling is very questionable, and variable.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Well, if imitation is sincere flattery, then what is renumerated appropriation...?

    If an MC/producer is borrowing a beat or a piece of music because it aesthetically suits the production, then isn't that also a tribute of sorts...saying, 'yes, I want that'...?

    From what I understand, they're now quite strict about compensating and acknowledging sources, as they should be.  My only problem is with blatant ripoffs without paying the artist.

    Again, aesthetically, there's good reason why James Brown riffs are/were so often sampled - because stylistically hip-hop is closest to funk, and because the funky beats are what drive some of the best hip-hop.

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    I think one of the most creative and 'fun' uses of sampling was Robert Plant's 'Tall Cool One', which sampled a bunch of Zeppelin songs.



    Brilliant!  Also put the "I" in irony.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to yogafriend's comment:

    In response to polar123's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    Music sampling is a legal minefield and headache imo.  Many artists will tell you that sampling is nothing more than a lazy, blatant ripoff of another arists creation. Others will say it's a great way to get their music heard, or in front of a new generation of buyers as long as the money is good. What I find funny, is that we as consumers of music think nothing of downloading a song from a music sharing website (not Itunes) without getting the permission of the artist or record label. Artists on the other hand have to get permission to sample music in their songs, otherwise it is copyright infrigment. Just ask Vanilla Ice who ripped off Queens Under Pressure and ridculously tried to prove otherwise.

    Sampling works best imo when you combine two totally different elements, era's or styles of music such as Run DMC's Walk This Way and NAS's ina-gadda-da-vida.

     



    RE: legal issues.  The mistakes, and/or deliberate attempts at ripoffs have been made, and anyone that violates or does an end run now, should be penalized.   Those instances probably occur less often now.   

     

    I am a big fan of sampling, and see it as an art unto itself.  The more offbeat the better.   What a coincidence re: mentioning copyright infringement, because one of the early examples I've always loved is Run DMC's "Can't Touch This" that samples the opening riffs from "Superfreak" (Rick James). Talk about coincidences:  I just looked it up while I was here, and sure enough, Rick James was going to sue Hammer for the use of the riffs without his permission.   hahaha.   Guess how they worked it out?   They settled out of court, and Hammer made James the co-composer, thereby allowing James to partake in the millions of dollars the record was raking in.    Ha!!   Not a bad outcome for James on that one.   =) 

    [/QUOTE]

    I loathe sampling in every way.  I don't know much about popular things, but wasn't it MC Hammer ripping off (oops, sampling) Rick James on "Can't Touch This"?

    Beat, rhythm, harmony, melody and lyrics....isn't that largely what comprises "music"?  (feel free to correct me, I'm not a musician).  Any of us could make a decent stab at lyrics, and most of us (though not me) could come up with a decent beat.

    IMO, it's melody that is king....it's melody you hum unknowingly, and can't forget....and it isn't sold online i.e. "Buy your melody here, just $20 for a killer melody".  :-)

    IMO, if MC Hammer kept even a single penny of songwriting royalties it was a travesty.  I'm afraid to look for fear of disappointment.

    I'm a huge, lifelong fan of the Rolling Stones.....and had/have very little interest in the '90s "Britpop" bands including "The Verve".

    But I have never been able to hear/understand the issue multi-millionaire Sir Michael Jagger and his multi-millionaire songwriting partner Keith Richards had with them.  To wit:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lyu1KKwC74

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27ouOE4RvUc

    Can anyone explain to me why the Verve thought they needed to purchase "sampling" rights?  I don't get it.....other than greed.

    I assume it's an Elvis/Chuck Berry thing i.e. if Elvis was Black and Chuck was white.....

    .....if the Verve were rich and the Stones were poor.....

     

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

    As far as the legal/ethical issues are concerned, I have no problem with sampling as long as the original artists are properly credited, or paid, as the case may be.  Just keep it above board, folks.



    Exactly, it is so simple....don't steal!  And compensate people for their time and talent!

    Personally, I hate "sampling"....I think it's a cheap, sleazy and lazy way to pretend that you are the true creator of a song....and even though in recent years the proper composers are usually compensated for their art....there are still many phonies living off "shared" mechanical royalties and performance royalties when, IMO, it's a giant ripoff that exists because too few people care about it.

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    The Stones, BTW, had the tables turned on them with their single 'Anybody Seen My Baby?', which had a melody almost identical to KD Lang's 'Constant Craving'.  The Stones wisely gave songwriting credits to Lang and her co-writer, and shared the royalties with them.  

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to SonicsMonksLyresVicars' comment:

     


    I loathe sampling in every way.  I don't know much about popular things, but wasn't it MC Hammer ripping off (oops, sampling) Rick James on "Can't Touch This"?



    MC Hammer made Rick James co-author, thereby James shared in all the  $$ loot $$.   No ripoffs in that deal.   

    Not surprised you're not a fan of sampling.   Laughing

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to Harvey-Wallbanger's comment:

    I don't get the Verve comment.  The Stones really reached on their claim that the bongos somehow were a copyright infringement.  I don't think The Verve ever felt that to be a violation.  Then again, it would have been so easy to add your own bongos.

    They wrote the lyrics melody, at least Ashcroft did. I always saw it as a tip of the cap to the Stones, but the Stones will never miss a chance to make money.

     



    I think you misunderstand me, Harvey.  I used that (and I am no expert) as example of a band being abused and taken advantage of.  I literally am not able to understand the plagiarism issue there.  

    MC Hammer/Rick James?  Nolo contendere or, for MC Hammer fans, a Slam Dunk!  And didn't the similarly, skin-crawlingly awful, Vanilla Ice Cream Tea do the same to a Queen song?  (at least Rick James was good, and cool!)

    Chiffons/George Harrison?  That interests me.

    [for the record, I love George Harrison, like Rick James a lot, am neutral on the Verve and the Chiffons, and despise the other two nothings]

    Chiffons:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rinz9Avvq6A

    Harrison:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kNGnIKUdMI

    Is it credible to believe that the world-famous musician George Harrison would have conciously ripped off a song made famous only 7 years previously?  No way, IMO....on both decency and logical grounds.  But we're all products of our environments, and all artists admit they have influences.....and I'm not aware of anybody inventing new notes or colours in recent years. :-)

    But I can understand why it was pursued, the songs are so similar.  And, on balance, I think it was a fair decision....but think - at worst - it was unconscious plagiarism.  But In George I Trust(ed), my favourite Beatle.....and by far my favourite post-Beatle Beatle.

    This song:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me8h6qET19s

    This song has nothing tricky about it
    This song ain't black or white and as far as I know
    Don't infringe on anyone's copyright, so . . .

    This song we'll let be
    This song is in E
    This song is for you and . . .

    This tune has nothing Bright about it
    This tune ain't bad or good and come ever what may
    My expert tells me it's okay

    As this song came to me
    Quite unknowingly
    This song could be you could be . . .

    This riff ain't trying to win gold medals
    This riff ain't hip or square
    Well done or rare
    May end up one more weight to bear

    But this song could well be
    A reason to see - that
    Without you there's no point to . . . this song

     

     

     

     
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    Re: Music sampling: Hit or miss?

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:


    Well, if imitation is sincere flattery, then what is renumerated appropriation...?

     

    If an MC/producer is borrowing a beat or a piece of music because it aesthetically suits the production, then isn't that also a tribute of sorts...saying, 'yes, I want that'...?

    From what I understand, they're now quite strict about compensating and acknowledging sources, as they should be.  My only problem is with blatant ripoffs without paying the artist.

    Again, aesthetically, there's good reason why James Brown riffs are/were so often sampled - because stylistically hip-hop is closest to funk, and because the funky beats are what drive some of the best hip-hop.

    The main reason any song  (or opening riffs) would be repeatedly sampled is certainly because it has something others covet, but that's not the same as paying tribute.  Sorry.  Just my take.  

    Yeah, I want that ... and it's easier to sleaze off of you, than for me to be inspired by you, and influenced by you,  and write my own.   

    Compensation goes without saying; I don't know how anyone who makes a recording using sampling would think they can get away with usage without permission and a monetary agreement, but I'm sure it still happens (along with the lawsuits).    

     

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