The unrecognizable song to artist connection

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    The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    Can you give some examples of songs that are vast departures from what you have come to expect or relate to a particular band or solo artist?

    Songs that you heard, for example, and couldn't wait to find out whose song it was, only to learn it was a band you know, and know well.   

    Songs that just took off in a direction that left you thinking, "I did not recognize who was playing that song" ... or if not that extreme, then something relatively close.   

    The "trademark sound" was absent, or barely there.   

    Any examples? 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    I think when I first bought the LP Mirrors by Blue Oyster Cult in 1979 , I was thinking this is a joke. The opening track 'Dr. Music' is so unlike them that I still hate it to this day. the rest of the album has few bright spots, but at least the songs are recognizable as BOC.

    I think 'Miss You' by the Stones is a change from their regular style as it is clearly their "disco" song....thankfully their only one. However , you could never mistake the song as anything but a Stones song becuase it is undoubtedly Mick, although he did do some solo work. The album Some Girls was released with so much hype , you couldn't not know it was a Stones song.

    Led Zeppelin's In Through The Out Door contains a few unZeppelin -like songs 'Carouselarama' , 'All Of My Love'.....but opening track 'In The Evening' has the sledgehammer sound of vintage Zeppelin. Again, the Robert Plant vocals make it impossible not to know you are listening to LZ.

    I am so familiar with the many great groups in Rock (and have been for a long time) that I would have trouble not recognizing a band rather quickly.

    I think if I hadn't known 'Lay, Lady , Lay' was Dylan I might be thrown off, but I always knew that was one of his. It sort of has a different sound than most of his music of that time period.

    I think I've nailed songs that relate to your first paragraph, but mostly I knew what band it was , just didn't believe my ears right away. The part about "not recognizing" doesn't apply to these because I knew beforehand.

    I will post any others that might apply to the 2nd or 3rd paragraph of your post, if I think of any.

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    For me the best example I can think of is 'Showdown at Big Sky'.

    The first time I heard it I thought 'Great song - who the heck is it?'

    It was the first single from Robbie Robertson's first solo album.  It certainly didn't sound like a Band song, and of course he didn't do any lead vocals with The Band to begin with.  So it was a real surprise package. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think when I first bought the LP Mirrors by Blue Oyster Cult in 1979 , I was thinking this is a joke. The opening track 'Dr. Music' is so unlike them that I still hate it to this day. the rest of the album has few bright spots, but at least the songs are recognizable as BOC.

    I think 'Miss You' by the Stones is a change from their regular style as it is clearly their "disco" song....thankfully their only one. However , you could never mistake the song as anything but a Stones song becuase it is undoubtedly Mick, although he did do some solo work. The album Some Girls was released with so much hype , you couldn't not know it was a Stones song.

    Led Zeppelin's In Through The Out Door contains a few unZeppelin -like songs 'Carouselarama' , 'All Of My Love'.....but opening track 'In The Evening' has the sledgehammer sound of vintage Zeppelin. Again, the Robert Plant vocals make it impossible not to know you are listening to LZ.

    I am so familiar with the many great groups in Rock (and have been for a long time) that I would have trouble not recognizing a band rather quickly.

    I think if I hadn't known 'Lay, Lady , Lay' was Dylan I might be thrown off, but I always knew that was one of his. It sort of has a different sound than most of his music of that time period.

    I think I've nailed songs that relate to your first paragraph, but mostly I knew what band it was , just didn't believe my ears right away. The part about "not recognizing" doesn't apply to these because I knew beforehand.

    I will post any others that might apply to the 2nd or 3rd paragraph of your post, if I think of any.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Great writeup.  I know, it's a fine line between recognizing the band, and being surprised at either the song choice, or the sound output.   It seems another rarity, however, for the regular "panel" here to be completely caught off-guard and not recognize the performing band at all.   

    I had to laugh (out loud, TBH) at the "disco" reference to "Miss You" -- I would *never* have associated that as disco, but now that you mention it, you make a good point.   :)

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    I can't imagine this song threw most people off, but since I heard it recently, I remember being completely caught offguard that "Angel of Harlem" was a U2 song.   The overall lyrics, subject matter, sound of the song --  it was a surprise.   Maybe a glimmer of recognition, but that was it.  

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from lefig. Show lefig's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    I was thinking of another Stones song, Emotional Rescue. That song too me represented a disco feel. What about Shakedown Street by the Dead. A lot of groups hopped on the bandwagon

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    It occurs to me that this concept works most often in reverse, in which an act gains commercial popularity and prompts listeners to go back through the band's catalog...and which are often nothing like the "hits".

    Fleetwood Mac has that ability to double-take people who have only heard the Buckingham-Nicks version of the band.

    I've stumped some people by playing The James Gang's "Take a Look Around" due to the effects on Joe Walsh's voice.

    Ditto on a few of the Steely Dan songs not sung by Donald Fagen (i.e., by original vocalist David Parmer), esp. "Dirty Work".

    "Who Loves The Sun" and "Oh, Sweet Nuthin" likewise don't sound much like the Velvet Underground we knew to that point.  Doug Yule's vocal sounds nothing like Lou Reed.

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to lefig's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I was thinking of another Stones song, Emotional Rescue. That song too me represented a disco feel. What about Shakedown Street by the Dead. A lot of groups hopped on the bandwagon

    [/QUOTE]

    Shakedown Street has a disco-esque beat but feels more like a prog tune to me, ergo "Estimated Prophet" from a year earlier.  Jerry's voice is unmistakable to me.

    Point taken, however.

     

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    It occurs to me that this concept works most often in reverse, in which an act gains commercial popularity and prompts listeners to go back through the band's catalog...and which are often nothing like the "hits".

    Fleetwood Mac has that ability to double-take people who have only heard the Buckingham-Nicks version of the band.

    I've stumped some people by playing The James Gang's "Take a Look Around" due to the effects on Joe Walsh's voice.

    Ditto on a few of the Steely Dan songs not sung by Donald Fagen (i.e., by original vocalist David Parmer), esp. "Dirty Work".

    "Who Loves The Sun" and "Oh, Sweet Nuthin" likewise don't sound much like the Velvet Underground we knew to that point.  Doug Yule's vocal sounds nothing like Lou Reed.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Can certainly be the case when there's been a change of lineup, when the music has such a different character, you'd never know it was the same band, as in "Bare Trees" for FWM, to this day, one  of my all-time favorite albums, let alone FWM albums.   It's different with a solo artist, whose voice you'd be less likely to mistake, such as Elton John.   His music changed so radically, yet, his voice -- unmistakable.   

    "Dirty Work" is a Steely Dan song?   Get out!   Now that is another prime example -- I honestly did not know, and I love the song.    Honest?  (I thought it was either Yes, or a similar band from the 70's).     Too funny.   

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    It occurs to me that this concept works most often in reverse, in which an act gains commercial popularity and prompts listeners to go back through the band's catalog...and which are often nothing like the "hits".

    Fleetwood Mac has that ability to double-take people who have only heard the Buckingham-Nicks version of the band.

    I've stumped some people by playing The James Gang's "Take a Look Around" due to the effects on Joe Walsh's voice.

    Ditto on a few of the Steely Dan songs not sung by Donald Fagen (i.e., by original vocalist David Parmer), esp. "Dirty Work".

    "Who Loves The Sun" and "Oh, Sweet Nuthin" likewise don't sound much like the Velvet Underground we knew to that point.  Doug Yule's vocal sounds nothing like Lou Reed.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Can certainly be the case when there's been a change of lineup, when the music has such a different character, you'd never know it was the same band, as in "Bare Trees" for FWM, to this day, one  of my all-time favorite albums, let alone FWM albums.   It's different with a solo artist, whose voice you'd be less likely to mistake, such as Elton John.   His music changed so radically, yet, his voice -- unmistakable.   

    "Dirty Work" is a Steely Dan song?   Get out!   Now that is another prime example -- I honestly did not know, and I love the song.    Honest?  (I thought it was either Yes, or a similar band from the 70's).     Too funny.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Heh.  Like I said, I don't think you're the first one to miss that connection.

    Again, Donald Fagen has a rather distinctive voice which is a primary thread running through (virtually) all of the band's work.  It's the most recognizable clue that what you're hearing is probably The Dan.

    But that first album - which to me is their most pop-oriented - has at least two tracks with different lead vocalists; on the rest, you can more clearly hear Fagen's jazzy warble.

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    A few singles that really surprised me the first time I heard them-I knew who the artist was but it didn't sound like them.

    Elton John - Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting - it sounded like Alice Cooper to me.

    Eagles - One of These Nights - the reggae beat, the Queen-like guitar fills-I was very impressed (also stoned I think). 

    BOC - Shooting Shark - the synthesizer, the bass, the saxophone - it sounded like Alan Parsons Project.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    For whatever reason, REM's "Superman" did not sound like REM at all to me when I first heard it.


    Would the Stones' "Dear Doctor" count?

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from bombah. Show bombah's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think when I first bought the LP Mirrors by Blue Oyster Cult in 1979 , I was thinking this is a joke. The opening track 'Dr. Music' is so unlike them that I still hate it to this day. the rest of the album has few bright spots, but at least the songs are recognizable as BOC.

    I think 'Miss You' by the Stones is a change from their regular style as it is clearly their "disco" song....thankfully their only one. However , you could never mistake the song as anything but a Stones song becuase it is undoubtedly Mick, although he did do some solo work. The album Some Girls was released with so much hype , you couldn't not know it was a Stones song.

    Led Zeppelin's In Through The Out Door contains a few unZeppelin -like songs 'Carouselarama' , 'All Of My Love'.....but opening track 'In The Evening' has the sledgehammer sound of vintage Zeppelin. Again, the Robert Plant vocals make it impossible not to know you are listening to LZ.

    I am so familiar with the many great groups in Rock (and have been for a long time) that I would have trouble not recognizing a band rather quickly.

    I think if I hadn't known 'Lay, Lady , Lay' was Dylan I might be thrown off, but I always knew that was one of his. It sort of has a different sound than most of his music of that time period.

    I think I've nailed songs that relate to your first paragraph, but mostly I knew what band it was , just didn't believe my ears right away. The part about "not recognizing" doesn't apply to these because I knew beforehand.

    I will post any others that might apply to the 2nd or 3rd paragraph of your post, if I think of any.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Great writeup.  I know, it's a fine line between recognizing the band, and being surprised at either the song choice, or the sound output.   It seems another rarity, however, for the regular "panel" here to be completely caught off-guard and not recognize the performing band at all.   

    I had to laugh (out loud, TBH) at the "disco" reference to "Miss You" -- I would *never* have associated that as disco, but now that you mention it, you make a good point.   :)

     

    [/QUOTE]


    You can add the song In Thee from the same B.O.C. album.Had no idea it was B.O.C. and a ballad on top of it.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to bombah's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to yogafriend's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think when I first bought the LP Mirrors by Blue Oyster Cult in 1979 , I was thinking this is a joke. The opening track 'Dr. Music' is so unlike them that I still hate it to this day. the rest of the album has few bright spots, but at least the songs are recognizable as BOC.

    I think 'Miss You' by the Stones is a change from their regular style as it is clearly their "disco" song....thankfully their only one. However , you could never mistake the song as anything but a Stones song becuase it is undoubtedly Mick, although he did do some solo work. The album Some Girls was released with so much hype , you couldn't not know it was a Stones song.

    Led Zeppelin's In Through The Out Door contains a few unZeppelin -like songs 'Carouselarama' , 'All Of My Love'.....but opening track 'In The Evening' has the sledgehammer sound of vintage Zeppelin. Again, the Robert Plant vocals make it impossible not to know you are listening to LZ.

    I am so familiar with the many great groups in Rock (and have been for a long time) that I would have trouble not recognizing a band rather quickly.

    I think if I hadn't known 'Lay, Lady , Lay' was Dylan I might be thrown off, but I always knew that was one of his. It sort of has a different sound than most of his music of that time period.

    I think I've nailed songs that relate to your first paragraph, but mostly I knew what band it was , just didn't believe my ears right away. The part about "not recognizing" doesn't apply to these because I knew beforehand.

    I will post any others that might apply to the 2nd or 3rd paragraph of your post, if I think of any.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Great writeup.  I know, it's a fine line between recognizing the band, and being surprised at either the song choice, or the sound output.   It seems another rarity, however, for the regular "panel" here to be completely caught off-guard and not recognize the performing band at all.   

    I had to laugh (out loud, TBH) at the "disco" reference to "Miss You" -- I would *never* have associated that as disco, but now that you mention it, you make a good point.   :)

     

    [/QUOTE]


    You can add the song In Thee from the same B.O.C. album.Had no idea it was B.O.C. and a ballad on top of it.

    [/QUOTE]


    Over all , that album Mirrors is B.O.C. not completely "on their game." Some people dislike the album Club Ninja, for the same reason. Those are not there best LPs. But, although poorer efforts still better than some groups on their best day. I find bright spots on both LPs , however I would rather listen to Secret Treaties or Fire Of Unknown Origin anyday.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    For whatever reason, REM's "Superman" did not sound like REM at all to me when I first heard it.


    Would the Stones' "Dear Doctor" count?

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Anything "counts" if you didn't recognize it.   I'm no Stones expert (by a long shot), but I don't know if this one's a matter of not knowing *who* it is, as much as it being a departure from their signature sound.   Not a great song, IMO ... but what do I know?!   :)

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: The unrecognizable song to artist connection

    Dee Dee King, of course!

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-QveINMwkQ

     

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