What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    What has happened to the days when the vet would do a physical exam and just give you his honest opinion regarding your pet's condition?   Before ordering lab work, xrays and ultrasounds just to diagnose?   Is everyone afraid of liability now?

    I feel bad for an aquaintance of mine that took an old cat (15) to the vet and spent $$ for lab work and was told the cat was fine, well, a week later the cat is still sick...

    This person has taken care of ferals for a long time, spay/neuter/trap/release, raised money for charities.  The cat is a stray he took in.

     

     

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    Are those days gone?  Gracie's vet and her surgeon have been very honest.  The surgeon told us not to do the first knee if we couldn't afford or didn't want to do it twice given the stats on needing to do TPLO twice.  The regular vet has told me "that's no big deal, don't come in" on a number of occassions, too.  

    Sorry your experience and that of your friend is one that doesn't reflect basic integrity, but that is in short supply these days in every profession, I think.  
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Discretion is the better part of valor.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    Back in the day a vet would look over an old dog or old cat that was obviously very sick or suffering and offer euthanasia as an option, or send the pet home on comfort meds.
    Now it seems that the first thing the vet wants to do is labs and testing,  $$$.

    They say they can't treat unless they diagnose.

    I'm not talking about routine care or dental cleanings.

    Anyway, it just doesn't seem right.

    PS: They all say the same thing  "You're doing a good job."  This must be something new being taught in vet schools now.  How is that supposed to help?

      It doesn't.  It's condescending.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from keane5050. Show keane5050's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    I agree with you Robin.  Last year my 17 year old dog was declining quickly.  After many, many trips to the vet, lab tests and medications it was finally up to me to say enough is enough.

    Nothing they did was going to make her better.  It was only delaying the inevitable.  I had to be the one to even bring up euthanasia.  Although the vet readily agreed and made the process as painless as possible, I still am a little peeved that I, the owner, had to make the suggestion.

    They should understand how difficult this decision is and try to alliviate as much guilt as possible.  Rationally, I know it was the best thing to do but I will always feel like I was taking the easy way out by saying "no" to more tests.

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    @Keane,  Thank you, that's exactly the point I was trying to make.   They had me going back and forth for a month getting all kinds of meds in an attempt to keep her comfortable.  Each time I asked them, is she suffering?  Am I making things worse?  None of them would give me a straight answer, just psychobabble. 

    When what I really needed was support to help me make a very difficult decision. 

    Even when they told me she had less than a week left they were advocating procedures ($$) that might keep her temporarily comfortable.Undecided

    I did find a very nice vet (spoke on the phone) that makes home visits for euthanasia, most vets no longer do,  even though it would have been more expensive, I think it would have been well worth it.

    She was the only one who warned me and said, don't wait too long, they can get very sick fast.

    But because I kept getting the runaround, the timing wasn't right and I had to go to the cold creepy clinic where they make you fill out all kinds of paperwork and wait a long time, and ask you over and over again if you are comfortable with this?  Amatuer hour.

    She had Hemangiosarcoma, a monster cancer, silent killer, often there are no symptoms till it's too late.  Seems to be a genetic link, especially with Goldens,  German Shepherds, Corgis. Tends to affect medium and large dogs.

    Sorry for the loss of your dog, 17 years is wonderful, mine got 9 1/2 good years, that's more than a lot of them get, we have to look at it this way. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie26. Show pinkkittie26's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    In response to RockinRobin39's comment:

    @Keane,  Thank you, that's exactly the point I was trying to make.   They had me going back and forth for a month getting all kinds of meds in an attempt to keep her comfortable.  Each time I asked them, is she suffering?  Am I making things worse?  None of them would give me a straight answer, just psychobabble. 

    When what I really needed was support to help me make a very difficult decision. 

    Even when they told me she had less than a week left they were advocating procedures ($$) that might keep her temporarily comfortable.Undecided

    I did find a very nice vet (spoke on the phone) that makes home visits for euthanasia, most vets no longer do,  even though it would have been more expensive, I think it would have been well worth it.

    She was the only one who warned me and said, don't wait too long, they can get very sick fast.

    But because I kept getting the runaround, the timing wasn't right and I had to go to the cold creepy clinic where they make you fill out all kinds of paperwork and wait a long time, and ask you over and over again if you are comfortable with this?  Amatuer hour.

    She had Hemangiosarcoma, a monster cancer, silent killer, often there are no symptoms till it's too late.  Seems to be a genetic link, especially with Goldens,  German Shepherds, Corgis. Tends to affect medium and large dogs.

    Sorry for the loss of your dog, 17 years is wonderful, mine got 9 1/2 good years, that's more than a lot of them get, we have to look at it this way. 



    My cat just passed away last month. We had adopted her from a woman who traveled a lot for work and just couldn't give her the attention she wanted. The vet estimated she was 8-10 years old when we got her. We faithfully brought her to the vet for three more years, and then they started wanting to do all sorts of tests. Why run a bunch of lab work on a cat that isn't even sick? We just couldn't stomach the idea of putting her through all that. So, we decided that unless she was in pain, she wasn't going to the vet anymore.

    That was 7 years ago. Last month, our sweet kitty passed away naturally, wrapped up in blankets and towels on our couch in her favorite spot. She was 18-20 years old. No stressful trips to the vet or attempts to control her natural decline. She was happy right up until the last minute, and slipped away peacefully while sleeping. I have no doubt in my mind that this was exactly how she wanted to go. No meds. No doctors.

    I've had cats who have gotten gravely ill and have obviously been in a lot of pain, so if course we had to put them down. But we could never see paying thousands of dollars and making the cat miserable just to be told "your cat is old and dying." I think if you really love your pet you can make the right decision on whether a trip to the vet will help or hurt. You know your pet better than the vet does.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    @pinkkittie
    Of course, I agree with you, but some forms of cancer are insidious.

     I wanted to believe I could keep her comfortable a bit longer.... the vets that examined her, knew what the real deal was.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from rrcat. Show rrcat's posts

    Re: What has happened to reasonable humane care for a cat or dog that is obviously very sick or old

    I just recently had to put one of my cats to sleep.  He'd been sick for a while with diarrhea.  We did do an ultrasound, but it wasn't definitive, although the vet suspected lymphoma.  My vet told me there were some other tests that could be done but they were very expensive and he didn't think it was worth it.  He suggested trying antibiotics just in case it was an infection, but when they didn't work, he definitely didn't push for more tests.  And my vet called every other day to see how Taffy was doing.  We finally made the euthanasia decision, sadly, but I cannot say enough about how compassionate and caring my vet was.

     

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