food allergies in dogs

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    food allergies in dogs

    I didn't want to hijack the human food thread, but what some of you mentioned has me wondering if my dog might have a food allergy, or if it could be seasonal/heat related.  He has always been an "itchy" dog - he's a BT mix, and they tend to have dry/sensitive skin, but seems to be itchier than usual lately. He has always sratched at his collar but now goes for hiis sides right around where the ribs end.  We have checked for fleas and ruled that out.  He also had an otameal bath last week that seemed to sooth it for a few hours.  His belly also looks a little pink to me.  Are ther other symptoms I should be looking for?

    We changed his food about 6-8 weeks ago.  He gets a chicken and rice kibble.  How would I figure it out?  Switch to another food?  I know the brand comes in lamb and rice and I think other flavors, but how would I rule out the chicken and not some other indgredient in the brand?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    check the label to see if the lamb formula has any chicken in it. If it doesn't, switch him onto it and see if he improves. It's a proccess of elimination, sometimes it's best to go straight to a fish formula because it will have more fish oil in it, and that soothes skin allergies. Max gets Spot's Stew in Salmon and he loves it.

    you can start giving him omega-3 fish oil skin & coat supplements now. Even if he doesn't have an allergy, they help to keep his skin and fur from becoming dry.

    The problem is that he might just have some environmental allergy, and that won't go away no matter how many foods you try. Supplements is all you can do for those kinds of allergies, and baths every other week. Vaccuuming once a week if you have a carpet, and the furniture, too.
    If it is environmental, hopefully it's seasonal and he'll be more comfortable in the fall.

    How old is he? I read somewhere once that dogs don't begin to present allergy symptoms until 1-2 years of age. But I could be wrong.
    Puppies gorw pretty quickly, so some shedding and dandruff can be natural, but the skin and coat supplements will help with that as well.

    and Kar found out that her dog was allergic to tennis balls. So it could even be something little like that.

     
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    Re: food allergies in dogs

    I also read that allergies usually don't present in puppies under 1 year, which is why I hesitate to switch his food again.  He's just coming up on nine months.  It could very well be that he just has sensitive skin and I read too much on the internet.  I give him olive oil now for his coat, but maybe the fish oil will be better?  He's not itching all of the time and doesn't seem to be otherwise bothered. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    I'd give him fish oil Omega-3 and see how it goes. He probably just has dry skin, plus they shed (skin and hair) a TON when they're growing.
     
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    Re: food allergies in dogs

    Are the supplements specific for pets or can I pick up fish oil pills at CVS?  And should I break them and put it in the food or give it to him whole?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    Make sure it's formulated for pets, as i'm sure th dosage for humans is huge. I give Max these from Drs Foster & Smith.

    Kar always recommends Only Natural Pet, and they have a whole bunch of great skin & coat supplements. Including pure liquid salmon oil.

    Max prefers pills to liquids, but every dog is different. I put a little peanut butter on the pills and he swallows them.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from tm27es. Show tm27es's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    My dog is 7 1/2 and his allergies have steadily gotten worse. He developed them around age 3. This year was the worst yet, he developed a staph infection and had gone through 4 rounds of prednisone. My vet recommended he see a dermatologist. I took him to Dr. Laurie Stewart at New England Veterinary Dermatology and she was amazing. Turns out that the majority of dogs do not suffer from food allergies, they suffer from environmental allergies. My dog was taking 3 benadryl's a day and had built up a tolerance to it, also tried zyrtec. Nothing was helping. She put him on Atopica (cyclosporin), prescribed some shampoo and leave in conditioner. Within days he was better than he had been in years. The change was dramatic. I highly recommend asking your vet about Atopica or taking your dog to see her. My boy has not itched or scratched in weeks! He takes the atopica daily and has 2 baths a week. I wish I had known about this years ago! Best of luck!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    Thanks, Pink!  Yup, ONP has anti-allergy holistic stuff and supplements, too.  And, food that is supposed to be great for allergy sensitive dogs.   However, I'm actually ticked at them for selling Lawn Protect as a healthy way to keep the lawn from burning.  They don't disclose the danger it poses to the dog; the vet said it causes urinary tract infections among other things.   So, I have to admit at this point I don't really trust them to care as much about our pets as they would like us to think.  I can't imagine their fish oil or other allergy stuff is bad, but I'd run anything I think I'd like to buy past the vet first next time.

    Corn and wheat cause allergies in dogs and aren't good for them, anyway, as it's been said in the other thread.  They are the cheapest ones, unfortunately; a healthy diet is as expensive for our dogs as it is for us.
     
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    Re: food allergies in dogs

    Good info TM.  I'll keep it in mind.  For now I'm going to get him some fish oil supplements and ride it out a while.  He's still very young, and with a breed disposition toward dry skin I am thinking (hoping) it is seasonal/environmental, especially with all the humidity.  He's not constantly scratching, just more than usual.  He doesn't seem otherwise bothered or uncomfortable by it. 

    I had no idea there would be such a learning curve with puppies!!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    I didn't either - it's hard work and very stressful to raise a puppy right.
     
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    Re: food allergies in dogs

    In Response to Re: food allergies in dogs:
    [QUOTE]I didn't either - it's hard work and very stressful to raise a puppy right.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    But sooooo worth it!  Those puppy dog eyes and waggily tail melt my heart.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    Indeed - that whole body wag is just the best.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from sunshinemrs. Show sunshinemrs's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    I'm chiming in a bit late.  Food allergeries definitely exist in dogs - as my friend, a vet, says, Ears & Rears tend to give telltale signs especially to food allergies.  Persistent itchy ears and rears as well as ear infections and diarrhea are common signs.  I believe the fish based foods tend to have lower allergic reaction but check with your vet on what they would recommend.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    And, paws!  Our dog itched between her toes when she ate the duck she was allergic to.  We thought she might have gotten frostbite, but it was the food.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    I think the best way to deal with skin issues with a dog is to go to a raw diet.  If the dog has a big appetite and the RAW diet is too costly, I would consider going raw until the skin issues clear up and then slowing replacing some of the raw food with kibble - even a 50-50 combo will enable your dog to benefit from the raw diet.

    RAW dog food can be purchased with lamb, chicken, turkey, beef, venison, quail, rabbit, etc.  One reason they come in so many different combinations is enable owners to avoid foods that they know their dog is allergic to.

    If you switch to raw because of a food allergy concerns, you might want to start with Rabbit or Venison.  If the dog's allergies do well, then you might want to introduce chicken or beef to see if it's the source of the meat that was the problem or if it was the other stuff in the kibble that was causing the problems.

    Always freeze raw food and let it thaw before feeding it to your dog or cat.  Even if you buy it at Wholefoods, make sure you freeze it.  The freezing process kills any parasites that might be in the food.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    It does?!  Are you 100% sure?  I have frozen beef marrow bones I'd love to just hand her, but I'm petrified of parasites.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    In Response to Re: food allergies in dogs:
    [QUOTE]It does?!  Are you 100% sure ?  I have frozen beef marrow bones I'd love to just hand her, but I'm petrified of parasites.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    Freezing kills any parasites.  I'm sure.  I know a lot of people whose dogs are on a raw diet.  I give my dog marrow bones all the time.  Marrow bones are great for dogs.  The bones are great for their teeth and the marrow has a lot of good stuff for their bodies.  The pet store I go to sells frozen marrow bones by the bag.

    On a hot day, you could give your dog the bone without waiting for it to thaw.  It would be a nice cool treat.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: food allergies in dogs

    OK, thanks - she'll be psyched!  It's only 95 out there right now. :)
     

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