Pizza with no cheese!

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    Pizza with no cheese!

      Recently discovered this item in the health food/organic section of my market, if you crave pizza and can't have cheese, this is a great alternative!  
    A little salty for my taste (but then I don't add salt to anything),  once or twice a month it's okay with a nice salad.
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    I think the Amy's pizza is about $7.00,    cheaper than take-out,  it takes about 15-20 minutes to heat up in a regular oven (I don't have a micro-wave) and it doesn't have chemical crap in the ingredients. 
    Anyway, you can tell I'm a fan!    
    I don't like to cook,  but I suppose you could make something similar if you have the time and energy. 
    There are other reasons to avoid cheese besides digestive issues,  ie: cholesterol management, preference for a vegetarian diet.  
     
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    What Does it Mean to Be a Vegetarian or Vegan?

    @Plasko, if I thought I was in a court of law I would have provided a clearer definition of a vegetarian, such as:        
     Do They Eat Fish, Do They Eat Eggs, Do They Drink Milk?
    About 1 million Americans each year are adopting the vegetarian choice for their eating preferences so it is likely that you may know someone who is a vegetarian and possibly even a vegan.

    History of Vegetarianism

    A vegetarian is an individual who does not eat meat, but eats more than just vegetables. A common misconception is that the root of the word vegetarian refers to vegetables however it possibly refers to vegetus, the Latin word for lively. According to the Vegetarian Society, in 1847 they invented the word because they claimed that their diet that did not involve meat made them feel lively.

    Degrees of Vegetarianism

    Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian
    A lacto-ovo vegetarian is someone that does not eat meat but eats both diary products, food items like milk and all of its derivatives like cheese, butter and yogurt, and eggs. The cheese that they eat doesn't have rennet and yogurt that vegetarians eat doesn't have gelatin.

    Lacto Vegetarian and Ovo Vegetarian
    There are vegetarians who refer to themselves as lacto, lacto is Latin for milk, vegetarians and they drink milk and eat its derivatives. Now ovo is Latin for egg so ovo vegetarians eat eggs but do not drink milk or eat any dairy products.

    Semi-Vegetarian
    Simi-vegetarianism, also often referred to pesco/pollo vegetarianism, pescetarianism and pollotariansm, is a diet that is similar to that of a lacto-ovo vegetarian in that they eat eggs and dairy products but the diet allows certain meats but restricts others, most like all mammalian meat. Beef, pork and lamb are examples of the most common mammalian meats. Seafood and fowl are often eaten by simi-vegetarians. Pollo is derived from the Latin word pullus meaning chicken and pesco is derived from the Latin word piscis meaning fish. Thus some who is a pesco/pollo vegetarian is someone who eats fish and chicken, and a pollotarian eats chicken but not fish and a pescetarian eats fish but not chicken.

    Flexitarianism
    A flexitarian is a vegetarian that although they prefer to have a lacto-ovo diet they will occasionally make an exception for pragmatic, social or nutritional reasons. Most flexitarians will eat vegetarian dishes at home but when they are a guest in another persons home they may eat meat.

    Degrees of a Vegan Diet

    A vegan is someone who does not eat anything that comes from an animal, such as meat, eggs and diary products. Usually if a person refers to themselves as a vegan it is unlikely that their eating habits would include anything from an animal because if that was the case they most likely would refer to themselves as a vegetarian.

    Fruitarianism
    A fruitarian is someone who ideally has a strict diet of 100% fruits from plants and trees. Most of the time when someone refers to themselves as a fruitarian they have a diet that is about 75% fruits. Botanically speaking there are foods that are commonly called nuts, grains and vegetables that are fruits by definition.

    The best way to tell what degree of a vegetarian a person is or if they are a vegan is to ask them.

     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    Unfortunately a lot of people don't realize that some frozen foods are high in sodium.

    Never hurts to check the ingredients if you have any concerns.

    I love Amy's stuff,  just not every day! 
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    In Response to Re: Pizza with no cheese!:
    [QUOTE]Unfortunately a lot of people don't realize that some frozen foods are high in sodium. Never hurts to check the ingredients if you have any concerns. I love Amy's stuff,  just not every day! 
    Posted by Robin39[/QUOTE]

    Yeah but then some people are really stupid and do not realize that ANY pre-packaged meal is choc full of salt, high-fructose corn-syrup, or chemicals. "Name your poison" as the saying goes. Ofcourse these are the same people that probably would load up their own home baking with salt anyhow (tip: when you see a recipe in print or online, use at most a quarter of the salt they recommend, but usually a tenth-to-zero sodium works just as well). 
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    Good advice!
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    Unless you're baking...the salt plays a critical role in the chemistry of baked goods. Avoid making baked goods altogether if you would have to reduce the salt to meet your sodium needs.
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    In Response to Re: Pizza with no cheese!:
    [QUOTE]Unless you're baking...the salt plays a critical role in the chemistry of baked goods. Avoid making baked goods altogether if you would have to reduce the salt to meet your sodium needs.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    I would counter with the exact opposite advice! If you find that today's society and pre-packaged foods use way too much salt then the time has come to make your own from scratch! When I first came to North America, absolutely everything tasted of salt, now my taste-buds have been destroyed I can taste it far less, but I remember everything, from bread to cookies and cakes all tasted like I was licking a pile of pure salt. It was even worse in people's home baked goods, I remember trying to be polite when partaking in them, whilst tears were running down my eyes from salt burns. You won't find this in other areas of the world, thankfully! No wonder women here worry about water-retention!
    The problem, I think, is that here everything has salt in it. From day 1 we are programmed to crave it, then it takes more and more to be able to "taste" anything. All those subtle flavors I loved were destroyed by salt. 

     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    Baked goods depend on chemistry to work; reduce salt in those at great risk of their not coming out right. I make my own EVERYTHING because dh is intolerant of genetically modified food - it causes arthritis-like inflammation - and if you reduce the salt in a yeast based recipe, the yeast will work overtime causing all manner of problems, for instance. You'll have to ruin a few things at best if you mess with the salt in yeast based recipes, especially, but if the recipe requires it for certain chemical reactions you need the critical amount if it to work. I just started canning, and you can read all the bold printed warnings to not reduce salt or sugar willy nilly in those recipes or you risk botulism and other spoilage. That's one reason I got a pressure canner; I have more leeway with it. Of course, you can reduce or even eliminate salt in anything other than baked goods, or any other recipe that depends on strict chemistry to work, and have it come out perfectly fine. I'm pretty sure I'm on track, 40 years old, 5'3", and 124 lbs with a bp of 110/60. I prepare 90% of the food we eat and find restaurant food to be too salty so I must not use an average amount of salt in my everyday cooking. Baking is different, generally speaking.
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    That's very possible, but until you play around with it you will never know how things turn out, until they do. Some playing around might be required (and that is what cooking is all about anyhow). Whenever I see a recipe I always assume it to be a starting point rather than gospel. It would be boring to make something exactly as someone else makes it, especially when you are completely different people with differing tastes, differently efficient ovens, different bakeware that will conduct heat at different rates, get foods from different stores etc. 
    It is not like anyone would ever care if you changed their recipe, anyhow. It's only a recipe, after all. 
    As the saying goes "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" Laughing
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    In Response to Re: Pizza with no cheese!:
    [QUOTE]Baked goods depend on chemistry to work; reduce salt in those at great risk of their not coming out right. I make my own EVERYTHING because dh is intolerant of genetically modified food - it causes arthritis-like inflammation - and if you reduce the salt in a yeast based recipe, the yeast will work overtime causing all manner of problems, for instance. You'll have to ruin a few things at best if you mess with the salt in yeast based recipes, especially, but if the recipe requires it for certain chemical reactions you need the critical amount if it to work. I just started canning, and you can read all the bold printed warnings to not reduce salt or sugar willy nilly in those recipes or you risk botulism and other spoilage. That's one reason I got a pressure canner; I have more leeway with it. Of course, you can reduce or even eliminate salt in anything other than baked goods, or any other recipe that depends on strict chemistry to work, and have it come out perfectly fine. I'm pretty sure I'm on track, 40 years old, 5'3", and 124 lbs with a bp of 110/60. I prepare 90% of the food we eat and find restaurant food to be too salty so I must not use an average amount of salt in my everyday cooking. Baking is different, generally speaking.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    As for your hubby and his allergy, that sounds bad. Arthritis is horrible. But isn't it just corn that is currently GM? Does he get affected by high-fructose corn-syrup too? 
    I do think though that his might be the first case ever of an allergy to GM food. You might be able to get some fame and money out of this. I might see you guys on the news quite soon? 


     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    He's not the only one by far. If you're really interested you can watch "The Future of Food" on Netflix. However, my aunt is a chiropractor and nutritionist and her practice is full of people who have an inflammatory response to gm wheat, soy, and corn. He's one of many, many, and she is the one who alerted him to the real problem after a few specialist shrugged after a bunch of tests were negative. He was in major pain all the time and had no idea why. Now, he's free of it except when he goes off our home cooked, non- gmo diet. And, yes, ofcourse you can experiment to your heart's delight with sodium or any part if any recipe, no one will know or care except you and anyone eating what you cook! I was just giving a friendly heads up that often in baked goods the amount if salt is critical to the chemistry of the recipe and you'll seriously ruin it if you reduce it, but my all means, test my theory. :)
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    OK,
    Just a quick search led me to this page about making bread (it involves yeast):

    "There are only two other ingredients to worry about, sugar and salt. You can actually make bread without either but we include them because the sugar gives the yeast an easy first course, and both bring out flavor. You can adjust either to suit your taste or diet. "

    "Don’t add the salt yet. Yeast doesn’t like salt and will be happier if you add it after you stir in the first cup of flour. The flour acts as a buffer and prevents the salt from making a direct “assault” on the newly growing yeast."

    Also I remember that when I was growing up and baking sweet treats we never ever used salt. Possibly for savoury recipes, though, but never for sweet ones. So I honestly think it has nothing to do with the chemistry of baking and everything to do with personal taste.
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    @plasko,  I agree, very interesting, but  I find it hard to comprehend why anyone would go to the trouble to bake bread etc anyway!  There are a zillion products out there to choose from.

    Like you,  I find everything tastes salty,  I think you notice it more when you stop adding salt to your food,  same thing with sugar.

    Gooey desserts look like garbage to me!

    Why would anyone eat something that has no nutritional value and could cause you harm?
    I just don't get it!
     
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    Re: Pizza with no cheese!

    I use a breadmaker and in five active minutes and 3.5 inactive hours I have relatively cheap organic spelt bread that doesn't make dh sick...why wouldn't I do that? Hot, fresh, cheap, easy, and perfect for our needs. I make organic spelt pizza dough in it, too, yum! Plasko, I think it depends on the baked good. You can experiment if you want, and given our needs that don't include sodium concerns, I do, but I've made some pretty awful stuff before hitting on yummy treats that meet our needs. Again, I think you'd really be enriched by watching The Future of Food, by the way.
     

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