FOX NEWS GUEST TELLS FEMALE HOST TO QUIT GET MARRIED HAVE BABIES AND THANK MEN

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: FOX NEWS GUEST TELLS FEMALE HOST TO QUIT GET MARRIED HAVE BABIES AND THANK MEN

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Pretty sure she was talking about married women...but sure...let's change the subject to single mothers.

    Why haven't the Dems secured and guaranteed equal pay for men and women in the past? Surely there have been plenty of times where the Dems controlled Congress and could have pushed something through. Why haven't they? Why haven't the champions of equal pay gotten in done in the past?

    [/QUOTE]

    The topic is misogyny in social policy.

    Sure, it took them a while, but they did it. (The Supreme Court helped.)  

    Only 3 repubs in the house voted for it and 4 repubs in the senate (all women).

    (Of course, the repubs could have done it, too, if they wanted.  So, why didn't they?)

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Then why don't women still make the same as men for the same job???

    I have no idea why the Repubs didn't. I've never had the oppotunity to talk to a Repub senator or congressman. If I ever do I'll be sure to ask them.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    In many professions, they do.  In other, they're still behind the times.

    I suggest the repubs didn't do it because they didn't want to and/or didn't care.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not according to the scores of articles and complaints by women. 

     

    Women earned 76.5 cents for every dollar that men did last year, moving no closer to narrowing a gender pay gap that has barely budged in almost a decade.

    Male full-time workers notched median annual earnings of $49,398 in 2012, compared with $37,791 for female workers, according to a Census Bureau report Tuesday. In 2011, women earned 77 cents for every $1 men earned.

    The wage gap narrowed steadily through the 1980s and 1990s but the convergence slowed in the early 2000s. That may signal that two factors credited with advancing gender pay parity — education and legislation — lost some of their firepower.

    “Women’s increasing education is certainly a plus, but it’s not enough to totally change these trends,” said Francine Blau, an economics professor at Cornell University. “The really golden period was the 1980s, when the wage gap was consistently narrowing. Since then, progress has continued, but it has been more fitful and uneven.”

    In 1980, women earned 60.2 cents for every $1 men did; by 1990, that had climbed to 71.6 cents. During that time, women were pursuing more education, breaking into higher-paying occupations and racking up more hours on the job. They also were benefiting from the 1963 Equal Pay Act, as well as measures granting equal access to education and prohibiting sex discrimination.

    The most recent data reflect that younger workers are making inroads. In 2012, women between 15 and 24 years old earned 88 cents for every dollar that men did; the amount fell to 81 cents for women ages 25 to 44, and 74 cents for women ages 45 to 64.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/09/17/male-female-pay-gap-hasnt-moved-much-in-years/

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: FOX NEWS GUEST TELLS FEMALE HOST TO QUIT GET MARRIED HAVE BABIES AND THANK MEN

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Pretty sure she was talking about married women...but sure...let's change the subject to single mothers.

    Why haven't the Dems secured and guaranteed equal pay for men and women in the past? Surely there have been plenty of times where the Dems controlled Congress and could have pushed something through. Why haven't they? Why haven't the champions of equal pay gotten in done in the past?

    [/QUOTE]

    The topic is misogyny in social policy.

    Sure, it took them a while, but they did it. (The Supreme Court helped.)  

    Only 3 repubs in the house voted for it and 4 repubs in the senate (all women).

    (Of course, the repubs could have done it, too, if they wanted.  So, why didn't they?)

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Then why don't women still make the same as men for the same job???

    I have no idea why the Repubs didn't. I've never had the oppotunity to talk to a Repub senator or congressman. If I ever do I'll be sure to ask them.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    In many professions, they do.  In other, they're still behind the times.

    I suggest the repubs didn't do it because they didn't want to and/or didn't care.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not according to the scores of articles and complaints by women. 

     

    Women earned 76.5 cents for every dollar that men did last year, moving no closer to narrowing a gender pay gap that has barely budged in almost a decade.

    Male full-time workers notched median annual earnings of $49,398 in 2012, compared with $37,791 for female workers, according to a Census Bureau report Tuesday. In 2011, women earned 77 cents for every $1 men earned.

    The wage gap narrowed steadily through the 1980s and 1990s but the convergence slowed in the early 2000s. That may signal that two factors credited with advancing gender pay parity — education and legislation — lost some of their firepower.

    “Women’s increasing education is certainly a plus, but it’s not enough to totally change these trends,” said Francine Blau, an economics professor at Cornell University. “The really golden period was the 1980s, when the wage gap was consistently narrowing. Since then, progress has continued, but it has been more fitful and uneven.”

    In 1980, women earned 60.2 cents for every $1 men did; by 1990, that had climbed to 71.6 cents. During that time, women were pursuing more education, breaking into higher-paying occupations and racking up more hours on the job. They also were benefiting from the 1963 Equal Pay Act, as well as measures granting equal access to education and prohibiting sex discrimination.

    The most recent data reflect that younger workers are making inroads. In 2012, women between 15 and 24 years old earned 88 cents for every dollar that men did; the amount fell to 81 cents for women ages 25 to 44, and 74 cents for women ages 45 to 64.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/09/17/male-female-pay-gap-hasnt-moved-much-in-years/

    [/QUOTE]

    Your own example shows the gains pronounced among younger female workers.

    Progress doesn't happen overnight.

    Further, jobs in which salaries are more performance-based have historically been better for women re: equal pay.  Many organizations have moved to such models in part due to the fair pay act.

    None of this says much about professions which are predominantly staffed by women, i.e., jobs most men don't want to do.  As a general rule, these jobs pay less (think home-health care, day care, teachers, etc.), which exacerbates the problem (mentioned anecdotally above in your article).

     

     

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: FOX NEWS GUEST TELLS FEMALE HOST TO QUIT GET MARRIED HAVE BABIES AND THANK MEN

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Pretty sure she was talking about married women...but sure...let's change the subject to single mothers.

    Why haven't the Dems secured and guaranteed equal pay for men and women in the past? Surely there have been plenty of times where the Dems controlled Congress and could have pushed something through. Why haven't they? Why haven't the champions of equal pay gotten in done in the past?

    [/QUOTE]

    The topic is misogyny in social policy.

    Sure, it took them a while, but they did it. (The Supreme Court helped.)  

    Only 3 repubs in the house voted for it and 4 repubs in the senate (all women).

    (Of course, the repubs could have done it, too, if they wanted.  So, why didn't they?)

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Then why don't women still make the same as men for the same job???

    I have no idea why the Repubs didn't. I've never had the oppotunity to talk to a Repub senator or congressman. If I ever do I'll be sure to ask them.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    In many professions, they do.  In other, they're still behind the times.

    I suggest the repubs didn't do it because they didn't want to and/or didn't care.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not according to the scores of articles and complaints by women. 

     

    Women earned 76.5 cents for every dollar that men did last year, moving no closer to narrowing a gender pay gap that has barely budged in almost a decade.

    Male full-time workers notched median annual earnings of $49,398 in 2012, compared with $37,791 for female workers, according to a Census Bureau report Tuesday. In 2011, women earned 77 cents for every $1 men earned.

    The wage gap narrowed steadily through the 1980s and 1990s but the convergence slowed in the early 2000s. That may signal that two factors credited with advancing gender pay parity — education and legislation — lost some of their firepower.

    “Women’s increasing education is certainly a plus, but it’s not enough to totally change these trends,” said Francine Blau, an economics professor at Cornell University. “The really golden period was the 1980s, when the wage gap was consistently narrowing. Since then, progress has continued, but it has been more fitful and uneven.”

    In 1980, women earned 60.2 cents for every $1 men did; by 1990, that had climbed to 71.6 cents. During that time, women were pursuing more education, breaking into higher-paying occupations and racking up more hours on the job. They also were benefiting from the 1963 Equal Pay Act, as well as measures granting equal access to education and prohibiting sex discrimination.

    The most recent data reflect that younger workers are making inroads. In 2012, women between 15 and 24 years old earned 88 cents for every dollar that men did; the amount fell to 81 cents for women ages 25 to 44, and 74 cents for women ages 45 to 64.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/09/17/male-female-pay-gap-hasnt-moved-much-in-years/

    [/QUOTE]

    Your own example shows the gains pronounced among younger female workers.

    Progress doesn't happen overnight.

    Further, jobs in which salaries are more performance-based have historically been better for women re: equal pay.  Many organizations have moved to such models in part due to the fair pay act.

    None of this says much about professions which are predominantly staffed by women, i.e., jobs most men don't want to do.  As a general rule, these jobs pay less (think home-health care, day care, teachers, etc.), which exacerbates the problem (mentioned anecdotally above in your article).

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Except that I asked why the pay isn't the same and you said in MANY professions it is. My post suggests otherwise give how much lower the avg is.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: FOX NEWS GUEST TELLS FEMALE HOST TO QUIT GET MARRIED HAVE BABIES AND THANK MEN

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Pretty sure she was talking about married women...but sure...let's change the subject to single mothers.

    Why haven't the Dems secured and guaranteed equal pay for men and women in the past? Surely there have been plenty of times where the Dems controlled Congress and could have pushed something through. Why haven't they? Why haven't the champions of equal pay gotten in done in the past?

    [/QUOTE]

    The topic is misogyny in social policy.

    Sure, it took them a while, but they did it. (The Supreme Court helped.)  

    Only 3 repubs in the house voted for it and 4 repubs in the senate (all women).

    (Of course, the repubs could have done it, too, if they wanted.  So, why didn't they?)

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Then why don't women still make the same as men for the same job???

    I have no idea why the Repubs didn't. I've never had the oppotunity to talk to a Repub senator or congressman. If I ever do I'll be sure to ask them.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    In many professions, they do.  In other, they're still behind the times.

    I suggest the repubs didn't do it because they didn't want to and/or didn't care.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not according to the scores of articles and complaints by women. 

     

    Women earned 76.5 cents for every dollar that men did last year, moving no closer to narrowing a gender pay gap that has barely budged in almost a decade.

    Male full-time workers notched median annual earnings of $49,398 in 2012, compared with $37,791 for female workers, according to a Census Bureau report Tuesday. In 2011, women earned 77 cents for every $1 men earned.

    The wage gap narrowed steadily through the 1980s and 1990s but the convergence slowed in the early 2000s. That may signal that two factors credited with advancing gender pay parity — education and legislation — lost some of their firepower.

    “Women’s increasing education is certainly a plus, but it’s not enough to totally change these trends,” said Francine Blau, an economics professor at Cornell University. “The really golden period was the 1980s, when the wage gap was consistently narrowing. Since then, progress has continued, but it has been more fitful and uneven.”

    In 1980, women earned 60.2 cents for every $1 men did; by 1990, that had climbed to 71.6 cents. During that time, women were pursuing more education, breaking into higher-paying occupations and racking up more hours on the job. They also were benefiting from the 1963 Equal Pay Act, as well as measures granting equal access to education and prohibiting sex discrimination.

    The most recent data reflect that younger workers are making inroads. In 2012, women between 15 and 24 years old earned 88 cents for every dollar that men did; the amount fell to 81 cents for women ages 25 to 44, and 74 cents for women ages 45 to 64.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/09/17/male-female-pay-gap-hasnt-moved-much-in-years/

    [/QUOTE]

    Your own example shows the gains pronounced among younger female workers.

    Progress doesn't happen overnight.

    Further, jobs in which salaries are more performance-based have historically been better for women re: equal pay.  Many organizations have moved to such models in part due to the fair pay act.

    None of this says much about professions which are predominantly staffed by women, i.e., jobs most men don't want to do.  As a general rule, these jobs pay less (think home-health care, day care, teachers, etc.), which exacerbates the problem (mentioned anecdotally above in your article).

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Except that I asked why the pay isn't the same and you said in MANY professions it is. My post suggests otherwise give how much lower the avg is.

    [/QUOTE]

    Per the Institute for Women's Policy Research:

    "Pay equity may also be impacted by other more subtle factors than workplace discrimination. IWPR’s research shows that, irrespective of the level of qualification, jobs predominantly done by women pay less on average than jobs predominantly done by men."

     

    Point being that women earn far more equal pay in professions where they dominate; however, those jobs tend to pay less generally, which pushes the overall average down.

    I agree though that "unequal" occupations out-number "equal" ones.  It's getting better, but far too slowly....

     

     

     

     

     

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