Healthcare Costs Slowing

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    Healthcare Costs Slowing

    Slower Growth of Health Costs Eases U.S. Deficit

    WASHINGTON — A sharp and surprisingly persistent slowdown in the growth of health care costs is helping to narrow the federal deficit, leaving budget experts trying to figure out whether the trend will last and how much the slower growth could help alleviate the country’s long-term fiscal problems.

    In figures released last week, the Congressional Budget Office said it had erased hundreds of billions of dollars in projected spending on Medicare and Medicaid. The budget office now projects that spending on those two programs in 2020 will be about $200 billion, or 15 percent, less than it projected three years ago. New data also show overall health care spending growth continuing at the lowest rate in decades for a fourth consecutive year.

    Health experts say they do not yet fully understand what is driving the lower spending trajectory. But there is a growing consensus that changes in how doctors and hospitals deliver health care — as opposed to merely a weak economy — are playing a role. Still, experts sharply disagree on where spending might be in future years, a question with major ramifications for the federal deficit, family budgets and the overall economy.

    Part of the slowdown stems from “the recession and the loss of income and wealth” causing people to cut back on health care, Douglas W. Elmendorf, the director of the Congressional Budget Office, said last week. But he added that a “significant part” of the slowdown “probably arises from structural changes in the health care system"

    The slowdown has occurred in both government and overall health spending. From 2009 to 2011, total health spending grew at the lowest annual pace since the government started keeping records 52 years ago, a trend that seems to have continued last year. In the 2012 fiscal year, Medicare spending per beneficiary grew just 0.4 percent. The new Congressional Budget Office data said that overall Medicare outlays grew 3 percent in 2012, the slowest rate since 2000.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/12/us/politics/sharp-slowdown-in-us-health-care-costs.html?hp

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    "the Congressional Budget Office said it had erased hundreds of billions of dollars in projected spending on Medicare and Medicaid. The budget office now projects that spending on those two programs in 2020 will be about $200 billion, or 15 percent, less than it projected three years ago."

    "erased from projected spending"...

    So one set of totally-unreliable SWAG phony numbers from your Government on the deficit in 2020 has been replaced by another set of phony figures...

    Look, the 2020 deficit has been "cut" ! Congratulations!

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    And yet health care costs are still the #1 driver of personal bankruptcies and downward economic pressure on all but the wealthiest citizens.

     

     

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    In response to ComingLiberalCrackup's comment:

    "the Congressional Budget Office said it had erased hundreds of billions of dollars in projected spending on Medicare and Medicaid. The budget office now projects that spending on those two programs in 2020 will be about $200 billion, or 15 percent, less than it projected three years ago."

    "erased from projected spending"...

    So one set of totally-unreliable SWAG phony numbers from your Government on the deficit in 2020 has been replaced by another set of phony figures...

    Look, the 2020 deficit has been "cut" ! Congratulations!



    Don't worry.

    Fox and drudge will soon issue your freshly unwrapped talking points to dispute that thing standing right in front of your nose.

     

     

     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     

    I didn't quite realize the $2,000 decrease that Barry Boy promised in the first year... actually my costs have gone UP.

    Have your costs gone up or your premiums?  If the former, then why have your costs gone up??  

    There is a major difference, you know.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     

     

    I didn't quite realize the $2,000 decrease that Barry Boy promised in the first year... actually my costs have gone UP.

     

     

    Have your costs gone up or your premiums?  If the former, then why have your costs gone up??  

    There is a major difference, you know.




    I am sure a good part of it is the difference in the way health care is delivered. Even private insurers are getting on board. For example..last year..my health insurance instituted a higher copay for emergency room care. This served to discourage people from going to the ER for things like sore throats or sinus infections..or other minor ailments that can be addressed better by your own physician anyhow. It discourages the need for immediate gratification that some people have. One would think twice about going to an ER for minor ailments if they knew they were getting hit with  a $150 copay instead of the usual $20 copay.

    Those types of policies..as well as things like EMR are making the system more efficient, more cost effective and safer for patients. All good things!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    In response to miscricket's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     

     

    I didn't quite realize the $2,000 decrease that Barry Boy promised in the first year... actually my costs have gone UP.

     

     

    Have your costs gone up or your premiums?  If the former, then why have your costs gone up??  

    There is a major difference, you know.

     




    I am sure a good part of it is the difference in the way health care is delivered. Even private insurers are getting on board. For example..last year..my health insurance instituted a higher copay for emergency room care. This served to discourage people from going to the ER for things like sore throats or sinus infections..or other minor ailments that can be addressed better by your own physician anyhow. It discourages the need for immediate gratification that some people have. One would think twice about going to an ER for minor ailments if they knew they were getting hit with  a $150 copay instead of the usual $20 copay.

     

    Those types of policies..as well as things like EMR are making the system more efficient, more cost effective and safer for patients. All good things!



    Sme of these things make sense.  I still don't see how Obamacare impacts any of this.  Government needs to get out of the way on health care, period.

    btw, how much you pay depends very much on the type of plan and how you get it.  I spoke to a friend last weeI with a catastrophic plan.  The cost went up @40% over las year. Hardly the 4% others talk about.  Maybe the average is 4%.  Or maybe people are not factoring in the subsidies properly.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    I did a bit of research, and it is easy to find exceptions to this supposed good news. Yo pledges are seeing very large increases in offering coverage to  students, in some cases over 100%.  California blue cross is asking for a 20% increase.

    in general, Obamcc are will cause premiums Tories dramatically.  Here's an articles laying out some of ideas on this worthy of consideration:

     

    http://reason.com/blog/2012/12/07/why-obamacare-will-make-health-insurance

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re: Healthcare Costs Slowing

    In response to UserName99's comment:

    Slower Growth of Health Costs Eases U.S. Deficit

    WASHINGTON — A sharp and surprisingly persistent slowdown in the growth of health care costs is helping to narrow the federal deficit, leaving budget experts trying to figure out whether the trend will last and how much the slower growth could help alleviate the country’s long-term fiscal problems.

    In figures released last week, the Congressional Budget Office said it had erased hundreds of billions of dollars in projected spending on Medicare and Medicaid. The budget office now projects that spending on those two programs in 2020 will be about $200 billion, or 15 percent, less than it projected three years ago. New data also show overall health care spending growth continuing at the lowest rate in decades for a fourth consecutive year.

    Health experts say they do not yet fully understand what is driving the lower spending trajectory. But there is a growing consensus that changes in how doctors and hospitals deliver health care — as opposed to merely a weak economy — are playing a role. Still, experts sharply disagree on where spending might be in future years, a question with major ramifications for the federal deficit, family budgets and the overall economy.

    Part of the slowdown stems from “the recession and the loss of income and wealth” causing people to cut back on health care, Douglas W. Elmendorf, the director of the Congressional Budget Office, said last week. But he added that a “significant part” of the slowdown “probably arises from structural changes in the health care system"

    The slowdown has occurred in both government and overall health spending. From 2009 to 2011, total health spending grew at the lowest annual pace since the government started keeping records 52 years ago, a trend that seems to have continued last year. In the 2012 fiscal year, Medicare spending per beneficiary grew just 0.4 percent. The new Congressional Budget Office data said that overall Medicare outlays grew 3 percent in 2012, the slowest rate since 2000.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/12/us/politics/sharp-slowdown-in-us-health-care-costs.html?hp



    Oh, I should have looked at where this article comes from.  Now I can file it under propaganda and forget about this thread.

     

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