If MLK were resurrected

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  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName99. Show UserName99's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    No one can say what Dr. King would be thinking, saying or doing right now, since he was killed by a southern racist's bullet.

    Maybe he would be continuing his work to free white people of their bigotry, both blatant and subtle, through his messages of love and reconciliation.

    Perhaps he would be appalled at the forms of discrimination that still exist today, the lack of opportunities and hopelessness in his community and would understand that it is not so easy to erase the effects of slavery. Even 200 years later.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    Maybe he would be continuing his work to free white people of their bigotry, both blatant and subtle, through his messages of love and reconciliation.

    I think that he would be working to free ALL people of their bigotry...

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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    I mean, him not being a bigot himself.

     

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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to UserName99's comment:

    No one can say what Dr. King would be thinking, saying or doing right now, since he was killed by a southern racist's bullet.

    Maybe he would be continuing his work to free white people of their bigotry, both blatant and subtle, through his messages of love and reconciliation.

    Perhaps he would be appalled at the forms of discrimination that still exist today, the lack of opportunities and hopelessness in his community and would understand that it is not so easy to erase the effects of slavery. Even 200 years later.



    No one can say what Dr. King would be thinking, saying or doing right now except for you of course.

     

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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    This is somewhat wishful thinking at its most patronizing, but he's entitled to his opinion.

    But this passage stands out:

    "Rather, he would be raising funds to create programs that would show these young people that they do have real choices that can greatly enhance the quality of their lives."

     

    Isn't this the kind of social investment most conservatives (like the author) loathe...?  Is this in lieu of OR in addition to "raising funds" for food, health care, education and shelter that we already do...?

    Seems like there are lots of these "programs" which might need funds to develop and meet its goals.

     

    The comments at the end of this article are pretty torrid, BTW.  The notion of blaming this admin for racial divisiveness in America is so wrong-headed as to be almost completely suspect in its conception.

     

     

     

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    One of the demands of the marchers on Washington was a $2 minimum wage. That's $15.67/hr in real dollar terms.

     

     

     

    and something conservatives will like even less: 

    "I am now convinced that the simplest solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a new widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income," Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? (MLK, 1967)



    The March was largely a protest for economic rights as well as civil rights...

    ...with the idea that we couldn't have one without the other.

     

    Hence the contradictions in the OP's argument.  How can a man rise up with a foot firmly planted on his head?  

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    If King could be resurrected and see what was going on in America today, I suspect he would be extraordinarily pleased by many of the things he observed and disappointed by others. He, like almost everyone else, would be thrilled to know that there was a two-term black president of the United States of America and a black attorney general, as well as many other high government officials, business executives and university presidents.

    Perhaps just as thrilling would be the sight of black doctors, lawyers, airline pilots, construction foremen, news anchors, school superintendents and almost any other position imaginable in America. The fact that seeing blacks in such positions no longer raises eyebrows is a testimony to the tremendous progress that has been made in America over the last 50 years.

    There are some areas, however, where I suspect he might be less than thrilled. The epidemic of black-on-black violent crime indicates that there has been a significant deterioration of values in the black community. Not only are the lives of their fellow blacks and others being devalued by street thugs, but the lives of unborn babies are being destroyed in disproportionate numbers in the black community.

    There was a time when blacks were justifiably angry that the larger community discounted their value, but now, ironically, many members of the black community themselves place little or no value on these precious lives that are snuffed out without thought. I think King would be waging a crusade against the marginalization of black lives in America.

    Another area of great concern would be the fact that 73 percent of black babies are born out of wedlock. When this occurs, in most cases the educational pursuits of the mothers are terminated and the babies are condemned to a life of poverty and deprivation, which makes them more likely to end up in the penal system or the welfare system. This is a burden not only for the black community but for the nation at large.

    Although I believe King would be very concerned for all parties in these tragedies, his energies would be primarily channeled into an attempt to give these young women the kind of self-esteem that would preclude their yielding to the charms of individuals who really don’t care about them and are only interested in their selfish pleasures.

    SEE ALSO: Morning rally kicks off day’s events honoring March on Washington

    King was a huge advocate of education and would be horrified by the high dropout rates in many inner-city high schools. He, like many others, was vilified, beaten and jailed for trying to open the doors of education to everyone, regardless of their race.

     

    If he were alive today, he would have to witness people turning their backs on those open doors and choosing to pursue lives of crime or dependency. I do not believe he would simply complain about these things, however.

    Rather, he would be raising funds to create programs that would show these young people that they do have real choices that can greatly enhance the quality of their lives.

    Perhaps the biggest disappointment for King would be the wholesale adoption of a victim mentality that makes people feel that they are entitled to being cared for by others rather than working tirelessly to create wealth and opportunities for their progeny.

    The amount of wealth that resides within the black community today is staggering. If the black community, like Jewish, Korean and other cultures in America, learned how to turn over dollars within their own community at least a couple of times before sending them out into the larger society, they would create wealth.

    I believe King would advocate such economic policies and would encourage those who benefit from the wealth to reach back and pull others up by providing jobs and opportunities. I think he would stress the fact that this kind of philosophy will foster freedom and independence for the black community, regardless of whether anybody else helps or not.

    Finally, we should all remember the aspect of his dream in which he desired that people should be judged by their character and not by the color of their skin. In part, this means no one should assume that a black person would adhere to certain political orthodoxy any more so than a white person would.

    Certainly, we have come a long way, but there is no room for complacency.



    Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/28/i-have-a-dream-50-years-later/#ixzz2dIF8VQ2K

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    This is somewhat wishful thinking at its most patronizing, but he's entitled to his opinion.

    But this passage stands out:

    "Rather, he would be raising funds to create programs that would show these young people that they do have real choices that can greatly enhance the quality of their lives."

     

    Isn't this the kind of social investment most conservatives (like the author) loathe...?  Is this in lieu of OR in addition to "raising funds" for food, health care, education and shelter that we already do...?

    Seems like there are lots of these "programs" which might need funds to develop and meet its goals.

     

    The comments at the end of this article are pretty torrid, BTW.  The notion of blaming this admin for racial divisiveness in America is so wrong-headed as to be almost completely suspect in its conception.

     



    People in the private sector raising money to help communities and youth is exactly the way it should be done; not standing around waiting on politicians and govt to do it for us!

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    Why do people with this opinion scare the left so much?

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:


    And what about standing around screaming on BDC forums for people in the private sector to do it for us?



    The private sector through things like food banks, battered womens centers, addiction centers, after school centers and too many charitable organizations to name do so much with so little it's truly amazing. The federal govt could learn alot about spending wisely from them but, when the well (tax payer money) is so deep with no accountibility that is not what you get!

     

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:



    I dont' think anyone on the forums has suggested that we don't need to cut wasteful and useless spending out.


    On the other hand, I don't think we can leave it all to the private sector. It used to be that way, once, and the private sector most certainly did not magically fix everything. That's why government started with programs like food assistance.



    I agree the private sector at a time did a pretty poor job but, I also see how the govt is doing much worse now with alot more money!

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to tvoter's comment:

     

    People in the private sector raising money to help communities and youth is exactly the way it should be done; not standing around waiting on politicians and govt to do it for us!

     



    Except that the private sector doesn't raise enough to cover the bills...

    ...not by a long shot.  The govt always has to pick up the slack, and there's lots of slack.

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: If MLK were resurrected

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    People in the private sector raising money to help communities and youth is exactly the way it should be done; not standing around waiting on politicians and govt to do it for us!

     



    Except that the private sector doesn't raise enough to cover the bills...

    ...not by a long shot.  The govt always has to pick up the slack, and there's lots of slack.

     [/QUOTE]

    BS, I contribute to and my sons and daughters volunteer with orgs like:

    Homes for Our Troops

    Orphan Grain Train

    Feed the starving children

    Navy Seal foundation

    All completely privately funded and doing enormous good!

     

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