Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    The Massachusetts hackorama has outdone itself.
    One would think in 2010 (see below) the "Civil Service Commission" bent over to the public unions enough....nope.
    Points for the policemen's "Chief Wiggam" defense, that he thought powder on his police car seat was from a powdered doughnut!


    Salem News, 2010: "Once again, the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission has made clear that no public employee can be fired for any reason, ever.

    In a ruling even one of its own members found "absurd," the commission determined that even a school janitor guilty of working on an illegal gambling operation while on duty, has a right to return to his job.

    Eugene Casey, a former Methuen elementary school janitor, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor offense of using a telephone for gambling. Casey was part of a gambling ring that was handling up to $500,000 in wagers a week.

    Casey received two years of probation and a $2,000 fine. The then superintendent of schools fired him in 2007. He appealed to the state Civil Service Commission to get his job back.

    And in a 3-2 ruling earlier this month, the commission amended Casey's firing to a one-year suspension. While the commission did not order that Casey receive back pay, he can appeal that decision.

    The convoluted logic of Commissioner Daniel Henderson is stunning to behold. In Henderson's mind, Casey did nothing meriting firing since gambling is illegal only because the law says it is."

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

    THE most corrupt state in the union.

    Unions rule.




    Let's test your hair.  You are on something for sure.

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to Reubenhop's comment:

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     

    THE most corrupt state in the union.

    Unions rule.

     




    Let's test your hair.  You are on something for sure.

     



    Rube the union hack emerges.

    rubes motto:  pay your taxes and SHUT UP or we'll whack you.

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to skeeter20's comment:

    In response to Reubenhop's comment:

     

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     

    THE most corrupt state in the union.

    Unions rule.

     




    Let's test your hair.  You are on something for sure.

     

     



    Rube the union hack emerges.

     

    rubes motto:  pay your taxes and SHUT UP or we'll whack you.



    Union hack?  More unthinking rants from the ideologue dope. 

    Skeeter's motto: "I have mine: the he11 with everyone else."

    Should we test your hair too?

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    Reuben is part of the hackorama in Massachusetts, which has given Howie Carr more than enough material for a lifetime...

    Ninety percent of public employees in the United States enjoy defined-benefit pension plans, meaning they will receive a guaranteed income, and usually health insurance, until death. These benefits are prohibitively expensive, and more so when they are tied to retirement ages that are atypically low. Given rising life expectancies, we could see a raft of public pensioners spending more years collecting retirement benefits than they spent working their government jobs, and in fact this isn’t uncommon already.

     

    Thanks to the strength of teachers’ unions, the average retirement age for a public-school teacher in America is 59. In California, the oldest age at which some categories of state and local employees can retire is 60, though for most the age is significantly lower. It’s hard to generalize, because some unions have pillaged far more than others. For a sense of how extreme the demands of some can be, one more example will have to suffice.

    Until recently, employees of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority enjoyed “23 and out” pensions. No matter when they began their careers, they could collect nearly full pensions after 23 years on the job. (That has been raised to the a punishing figure of 25 years, and now with a minimum age of 55 before they can collect.) Perhaps the most famous member of the organization that negotiated these benefits, the Boston Carmen’s Union, is Patrick Bulger, son of longtime Massachusetts state-senate president Billy Bulger. The younger Bulger retired from the Carmen’s Union at 43 and began collecting an annual pension of $41,000. Plus cost-of-living adjustments. For the rest of his life.

    It’s hard to justify such benefits when the rest of America relies on 401(k)s, Social Security, and Medicare, making their effective retirement age, on average,  63 — and soon to rise. Public employees retire still very much in their working years. Even though they’re guaranteed financial security for life, some of them in “retirement” go on to lucrative jobs in the private sector — or, more disturbingly, back in the public sector. Take retired MBTA manager Michael Mulhern, age 48, who now enjoys a $130,000-a-year pension — and earns $225,000 a year as executive director of the MBTA’s retirement fund.  

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

    Yes comrade Rubie.

    You are actually defending law enforcement  found with cocaine in their systems.

    This means all police, fire and other (corrupt union) public officials are exempt from the laws.

    You paint yourself. You're a disgrace.

     

    As your counsel, I strongly recommend taking the 5th .. before drinking one. 

     

    Most things do not stand alone.. they are steps in a progression. What other laws arethe politically connected 'excused' from.  



    There is a problem with the testing: that is the issue.   People should lose their jobs if there is adequate proof.  It has nothing to do with politics or with unions.  That is just mindless ranting.  It is about what is required as proof before you lose an important right.  You have an odd idea of how "justice" works.  Maybe we should test your hair...

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

    Mu favorite Commie comrade posts his political propaganda from school.

     

    Lets do an IP trace and find out which one..




    Look outside you nitwit.  Snow.  It's a Snow Day you dope.

     

    And do you even have a job?  Seriously.  Do you work? 

     
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    Re: Law and Justice .. mutually exclusive

    In response to ComingLiberalCrackup's comment:

    Reuben is part of the hackorama in Massachusetts, which has given Howie Carr more than enough material for a lifetime...

    Ninety percent of public employees in the United States enjoy defined-benefit pension plans, meaning they will receive a guaranteed income, and usually health insurance, until death. These benefits are prohibitively expensive, and more so when they are tied to retirement ages that are atypically low. Given rising life expectancies, we could see a raft of public pensioners spending more years collecting retirement benefits than they spent working their government jobs, and in fact this isn’t uncommon already.

     

    Thanks to the strength of teachers’ unions, the average retirement age for a public-school teacher in America is 59. In California, the oldest age at which some categories of state and local employees can retire is 60, though for most the age is significantly lower. It’s hard to generalize, because some unions have pillaged far more than others. For a sense of how extreme the demands of some can be, one more example will have to suffice.

    Until recently, employees of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority enjoyed “23 and out” pensions. No matter when they began their careers, they could collect nearly full pensions after 23 years on the job. (That has been raised to the a punishing figure of 25 years, and now with a minimum age of 55 before they can collect.) Perhaps the most famous member of the organization that negotiated these benefits, the Boston Carmen’s Union, is Patrick Bulger, son of longtime Massachusetts state-senate president Billy Bulger. The younger Bulger retired from the Carmen’s Union at 43 and began collecting an annual pension of $41,000. Plus cost-of-living adjustments. For the rest of his life.

    It’s hard to justify such benefits when the rest of America relies on 401(k)s, Social Security, and Medicare, making their effective retirement age, on average,  63 — and soon to rise. Public employees retire still very much in their working years. Even though they’re guaranteed financial security for life, some of them in “retirement” go on to lucrative jobs in the private sector — or, more disturbingly, back in the public sector. Take retired MBTA manager Michael Mulhern, age 48, who now enjoys a $130,000-a-year pension — and earns $225,000 a year as executive director of the MBTA’s retirement fund.  



    Hackerama?  You have no idea who I am or what I actually do.  And yet you denigrate me.  Just shows you are a duckhead of the nth degree.  That's all you have proven. 

     
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