PP Starts With A Breakout

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from dezaruchi. Show dezaruchi's posts

    PP Starts With A Breakout

    As it stands right now, the biggest problem the Bruins face on the PP is gaining the zone. Once they're able to get in and set-up, they manage to move the puck fairly well and have had some good chances. The problem is, they're spending half of the PP just trying to gain a clean entry. I know some of you hate talking about gap control but this is crucial to Boston turning the PP around. The D have been going back for the puck and looking up to see 2 (sometimes 3) forwards past the center ice line. The PK forwards simply pressure the puck carrier as he approaches center.  This forces a weak dump in which the wingers aren't getting in quick enough because they're unable to generate enough speed skating between center and the offensive blue line. It may not seem like much but I think the PP could improve dramatically if the wingers came back another 6-10 feet.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ingrizzlebizzles. Show ingrizzlebizzles's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]As it stands right now, the biggest problem the Bruins face on the PP is gaining the zone. Once they're able to get in and set-up, they manage to move the puck fairly well and have had some good chances. The problem is, they're spending half of the PP just trying to gain a clean entry. I know some of you hate talking about gap control but this is crucial to Boston turning the PP around. The D have been going back for the puck and looking up to see 2 (sometimes 3) forwards past the center ice line. The PK forwards simply pressure the puck carrier as he approaches center.  This forces a weak dump in which the wingers aren't getting in quick enough because they're unable to generate enough speed skating between center and the offensive blue line. It may not seem like much but I think the PP could improve dramatically if the wingers came back another 6-10 feet.
    Posted by dezaruchi[/QUOTE]

    Pass better. That starts by playing someone other than Chara on D. Dude can't pass.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dezaruchi. Show dezaruchi's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to Re: PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]In Response to PP Starts With A Breakout : Pass better. That starts by playing someone other than Chara on D. Dude can't pass.
    Posted by ingrizzlebizzles[/QUOTE]
    Absolutely false.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from SanDogBrewin. Show SanDogBrewin's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    When Peverly, Marchand, Seguin and Corvo are on the ice during the PP the Bruins get their best chances while controlling the puck. Then the other unit comes on and I just look away till the PP is over.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from dezaruchi. Show dezaruchi's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to Re: PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]When Peverly, Marchand, Seguin and Corvo are on the ice during the PP the Bruins get their best chances while controlling the puck. Then the other unit comes on and I just look away till the PP is over.
    Posted by SanDogBrewin[/QUOTE]
    San, I agreed with Olcyk's observation that Corvo needs to try to sneak down low through the back door. Like most of the Bruins, he's guilty of standing still too much.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from RichHillOntario. Show RichHillOntario's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]As it stands right now, the biggest problem the Bruins face on the PP is gaining the zone. Once they're able to get in and set-up, they manage to move the puck fairly well and have had some good chances. The problem is, they're spending half of the PP just trying to gain a clean entry. I know some of you hate talking about gap control but this is crucial to Boston turning the PP around. The D have been going back for the puck and looking up to see 2 (sometimes 3) forwards past the center ice line. The PK forwards simply pressure the puck carrier as he approaches center.  This forces a weak dump in which the wingers aren't getting in quick enough because they're unable to generate enough speed skating between center and the offensive blue line. It may not seem like much but I think the PP could improve dramatically if the wingers came back another 6-10 feet.
    Posted by dezaruchi[/QUOTE]

    Bang on, dez. The lack of speed entering the zone seems to negate whatever they're trying to accomplish strategically with the odd man.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    They really should keep Chara off of the powerplay all together.  He's too slow to move the puck on the PP.  Yeah, yeah, booming shot.  How often does it help?  Rarely. 
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from dezaruchi. Show dezaruchi's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to Re: PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]They really should keep Chara off of the powerplay all together.  He's too slow to move the puck on the PP.  Yeah, yeah, booming shot.  How often does it help?  Rarely. 
    Posted by Not-A-Shot[/QUOTE]
    His first 3 years as a Bruins he was averaging 10 PP goals a year. That's where he's scored most of his goals throughout his career.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Chowdahkid-. Show Chowdahkid-'s posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    I think they've done a better job lately of gaining the zone . What I've noticed is that the passing once they gained the zone when they are pressured on the puck is poor. I see panic when they are pressured and a lot of bad decisions in their passing.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Chowdahkid-. Show Chowdahkid-'s posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    In Response to Re: PP Starts With A Breakout:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: PP Starts With A Breakout : His first 3 years as a Bruins he was averaging 10 PP goals a year. That's where he's scored most of his goals throughout his career.
    Posted by dezaruchi[/QUOTE]

    He has been at or near the top of the Bruins list for PP goals scored in all but 1 season since he's been a Bruin. He has scored over half of his career goals on the PP. More then likely these goals were scored because of the big shot from the point and not from fancy stickhandling.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from bogie6. Show bogie6's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    As mentioned above, the Bruins PP is too structured and they stand still too often. Waiting for last night's game to start, I watched the Rangers/Islanders, and focused on how much movement is on each team's PP, a far cry from the Bruins' static play. With the Bruins, there is still too much thinking, standing and lack of movement or shooting. The skills are there Claude, time to turn them loose.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Fletcher1. Show Fletcher1's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    All good points above, and Dez, I agree with the premise that the breakout seems to be the biggest hurdle, at this point.  I really like when anyone is able to skate it into the zone.  Dump and chase on the powerplay seems to have a pretty low success rate and this team does it a lot.  I think that Peverly has value on the powerplay for this reason -- he can carry to puck in from time to time.

    As for Chara, he does seem to struggle with a lot of aspects of the powerplay.  I would keep him out there, but DO NOT run the breakout through him as they sometimes do.  Wait until they are in the zone and then pass to Chara.  Between the shot and the ability to draw all of the attention from defenders when he drops down low, I think he is still effective.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from BsLegion. Show BsLegion's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    I just hope I don't have to see Chara in front of the net anymore.  Useless there. He's so big but doesn't move around well to even screen the goalie. He doesn't know how to tip a puck and when puck is in his feet on rebounds he cannot get around to the puck fast enough with that tree of a stick he has.
    As for his big shot that'll only work when they can move around the puck better.
    This PP needs a guy in front that knows how to tip pucks (RedWings type).  All those low shot on net from Corvo are going to waste.

    p.s. and not even with the extra attacker.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Stuke50. Show Stuke50's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    I think Chara should be used on the second unit. Have 2 units with pop. And keep him away from the front of the net. We have other big bodies to put there to act as a receiver from wood chops and hacking. We don't need him injured like that.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from saultont. Show saultont's posts

    Re: PP Starts With A Breakout

    The PP is generally a reflection of what is practiced...is it Ward...then obviously coaching is a big factor...nothing much changed from last season.
     

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