Celtics are too old is getting too old

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    Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Just for laughs, and because I am tired of hearing lakers trolls say the Celtics are too old to compete next year, I did a comparative study.  I wondered, with the signing of 27 yr old Delonte West, exactly how old are we?

    The facts are these:  I compared the lakers and Celtics ages.  For us, I took the age they will be during the season, and for them the age they are NOW.  For us, I counted all 15 players under contract, and for them I included second round picks Ebanks (age 21) and Caracter (age 22), who are technically not signed yet.
    Here are the results:

    Boston Celtics - 15  players, 419 years - 27.93 average age
    LAL - 14 players, 404 years - 28.86 average age

    Starting 5 (Perk is the Center) - BOS  30.4 years
    LAL - 30.4 years

    Top 8 - (take out Perk, add JON, Shaq, BBD and Nate) - 30.75
    LAL - add Odom, Blake and Barnes  - 30.375.

    Can you lakers trolls please come up with something else now, clearly this holds no water!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    The Big Three came into the league with a ton of physical ability.  Even at their advanced ages, they still have good physical ability left to go with great skills and great mental games.  I would imagine that what happened after last year's Playoffs, the hunger is still there.  Also we know young Rondo is close to being a great player.  After this core of 4 players is the Celtics 2nd wave of very good play.  Like a 1-2 punch.  Guys like: Perk, Big Baby, J O'neill, Shaq, Nate, Delonte and Von Wafer are an excellant support group.  Five of these players are still young.  Yes, the Celtics are a mixture of old and young good talent, but they may still have enough to take down LA, Miami, Orlando or anybody else that emerges. 
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Buddy, I like your style!!!!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Caracter and Ebanks signed with the Lakers weeks ago. And while the Celtics big three may be older than anyone on the Lakers starting five save Fisher, the Lakers will be right behind them in the aging department in a year or two. Hopefully Bynum will be hitting his prime by then.
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    30 is positively ancient from where I sit :P

    Seriously age of the teams don't matter, it's a case of managing players so that they can be as productive as possible. I think the Lakers and Celtics may not be so eager during the regular season, by this I mean that I don't think their concern is gaining home court during the play-offs. For both sides the season begins in the play offs.

    If this is Jacksons last year I do fear the upcoming seasons for the Lakers will not be very successful. The Celtics are looking at imminent retirements of Rivers, KG, Allen and after them Pierce? 

    I think this year represents the last realistic chance for both teams to win a championship. That's why both sides, being aged sides. Will be paced throughout the season. Championships are not won in December. 

    Rivers really does need to manage the veterans minutes better this year though. Be prepared to lose some games by resting players and sticking to rotations. 


     


     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]30 is positively ancient from where I sit :P Seriously age of the teams don't matter, it's a case of managing players so that they can be as productive as possible. I think the Lakers and Celtics may not be so eager during the regular season, by this I mean that I don't think their concern is gaining home court during the play-offs. For both sides the season begins in the play offs. If this is Jacksons last year I do fear the upcoming seasons for the Lakers will not be very successful. The Celtics are looking at imminent retirements of Rivers, KG, Allen and after them Pierce?  I think this year represents the last realistic chance for both teams to win a championship. That's why both sides, being aged sides. Will be paced throughout the season. Championships are not won in December.  Rivers really does need to manage the veterans minutes better this year though. Be prepared to lose some games by resting players and sticking to rotations.   
    Posted by RUWorthy[/QUOTE]    
    You raise some interesting points.

     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    No, no and NO!  He did that last year and we gave away too many games.  I want a 2 seed at worst.  I think as deep as this team is, Doc can give some vets the night OFF, and we should still win!
    Nate, West, Wafer/Daniels/BBD and Shaq is a pretty darn good unit - better than last year's, and one I think can and should hold their own.  No, I'm afraid I want 60 wins this year AND rested for the playoffs.  I really think this team is that good!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Huge call there. The team is deep, but we'll see how it all pans out. Wish the season was starting next weekend.

    Your bench is definitely better than last year. 

    I didn't think home court made a massive difference in the Eastern Conference play offs. Great sides should be able to win anywhere. 

    Personally I think Boston may burn out if they push to get 60 wins. 
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    The celts are old and don't have the drive to win again. It's obvious the only chance they have is injury's to other teams but hey at least they broke their 24 year old drought....even if it is tainted.

    Such is life.
     
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    In Response to Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]Just for laughs, and because I am tired of hearing lakers trolls say the Celtics are too old to compete next year, I did a comparative study.  I wondered, with the signing of 27 yr old Delonte West, exactly how old are we? The facts are these:  I compared the lakers and Celtics ages.  For us, I took the age they will be during the season, and for them the age they are NOW.  For us, I counted all 15 players under contract, and for them I included second round picks Ebanks (age 21) and Caracter (age 22), who are technically not signed yet. Here are the results: Boston Celtics - 15  players, 419 years - 27.93 average age LAL - 14 players, 404 years - 28.86 average age Starting 5 (Perk is the Center) - BOS  30.4 years LAL - 30.4 years Top 8 - (take out Perk, add JON, Shaq, BBD and Nate) - 30.75 LAL - add Odom, Blake and Barnes  - 30.375. Can you lakers trolls please come up with something else now, clearly this holds no water!
    Posted by BirdandCowens[/QUOTE]

    -

    All last season we had to endure the "they're too old" mantra even on this very same forum from so-called Celtic fans. I wonder what the mantra will be this season from the negative nellies.  Will they be trotting out the "they're too old" mantra again?  I bet they will whenever the C's hit a rough spot.  Whatever the mantra, I'm sure the nay-sayers, both here and far, will come up with something.

    As for a backup at small forward being a huge issue, a huge stumbling block, I think the agonizing about this is way, way overblown.  This is the GM-wannabe's mantra for the moment.

    Danny Ainge had a huge off-season, really improved the team and with Delonte in place I think he placed the last piece in the puzzle on the board.

    This is truly an awesome team, and the bench should not only be able to hold a lead but to extend a lead like they did in the early part of last season when the team was hitting on all cylinders.

    Barring the crippling injuries of last season the C's will be contending for another title.

    I can't wait to see this Celtic team in action.
     
    I posted this first on CF's thread on our Deep Bench.
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]The celts are old and don't have the drive to win again. It's obvious the only chance they have is injury's to other teams but hey at least they broke their 24 year old drought....even if it is tainted. Such is life.
    Posted by KB24RULZ[/QUOTE]

    Your knowledge of the game is sorely lacking:
    the lakers are OLDER - as I have clearly shown
    they DO have the drive, as they showed last year
    It was a 22 year drought
    Neither title is taintes

    Other than that, your post is dead-on!
     
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    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]Huge call there. The team is deep, but we'll see how it all pans out. Wish the season was starting next weekend. Your bench is definitely better than last year.  I didn't think home court made a massive difference in the Eastern Conference play offs. Great sides should be able to win anywhere.  Personally I think Boston may burn out if they push to get 60 wins. 
    Posted by RUWorthy[/QUOTE]

    You are correct on many points.  I do want health first.  BUT, while home court did not play a big role in the East, it played a huge role in the Finals. I just don't want to play a Game 7 in LA like last year.   I'd rather have it be in Boston.  We were 23-5 last year before "coasting" for the playoffs.  Let's just go 46 -10 this year, then coast.........I think this team can do that!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old : You are correct on many points.  I do want health first.  BUT, while home court did not play a big role in the East, it played a huge role in the Finals. I just don't want to play a Game 7 in LA like last year.   I'd rather have it be in Boston.  We were 23-5 last year before "coasting" for the playoffs.  Let's just go 46 -10 this year, then coast.........I think this team can do that!
    Posted by BirdandCowens[/QUOTE]   
    You made some good points.  We all know, on the opponents court all those screaming fans are too close to the referees.  Further, I don't like the idea of Boston playing Game7 in LA with Jack Nicholson and a ton of celebrities sitting ringside.  Theoretically, it should not make a difference.  I honestly don't know if celebrities can make a difference. The refs could be trying to be impartial, but they are only human.  I would like to know what a whole panel of credible psychologists think about this situation.     

     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]No, no and NO!  He did that last year and we gave away too many games.  I want a 2 seed at worst.  I think as deep as this team is, Doc can give some vets the night OFF, and we should still win! Nate, West, Wafer/Daniels/BBD and Shaq is a pretty darn good unit - better than last year's, and one I think can and should hold their own.  No, I'm afraid I want 60 wins this year AND rested for the playoffs.  I really think this team is that good!
    Posted by BirdandCowens[/QUOTE]

    I agree this team is deeper this year and Doc should be able to accomplish both. Yes a #1 or #2 seed is needed.
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Thought I'd revive this thread since it seems to be a hot topic again today!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old : Your knowledge of the game is sorely lacking: the lakers are OLDER - as I have clearly shown they DO have the drive, as they showed last year It was a 22 year drought Neither title is taintes Other than that, your post is dead-on!
    Posted by BirdandCowens[/QUOTE]
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Hi BC.....I just saw your response.....I don't even read his replies......I asked him when he started following the NBA a while back.....no comment.....that tells me he is probably a young teenage Kobe fan.....why bother? .....his post on Russell & Chamberlain was right out of an article from the NBA Encyclopedia.....word for word....he has no original ideas to add to the mix.....that's too bad......if he tried he would be accepted as a welcome fellow poster on this forum....instead he just posts sarcastic adolescent comments.....I am open to all opinions as long as we can have a dialogue and, when appropriate, agree to disagree.....Elias and I have some good banter.....we are just fans voicing our opinions.....many Laker fans are welcome here (Worthy and jofc immediately come to mind)...just saying
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old


    When things/people get too old, they are usually retired and 

    that's exactly what this topic about Celtics being too old to 

    compete should be done, end it, put it to rest & retire it.



    Mea Culpa for just copying & pasting my post from  

    another topic a month or two ago about Celtics

    being too old to compete. The key to their success 

    will be avoiding injuries. Regarding age, remember 

    George Allen's Over-The- Hill- Gang !


    I'm 71 and play competitive USTA tennis tournaments & beat most people my age at my level. But I also beat people 15-20 years younger and, sure, I use slices, topspin, drop shot, lobs etc. & mix up my game but because of experience, I many times beat a younger more athletic player.

    I know it's football but I remind everyone of the following when I read posts that the Celtics will be too old.

    Also, I do know that in tennis, one can catch his/her breath in between points having 25 seconds to put the ball in play and also there is a 90 second break to change sides after 3 games.
    Players can challenge calls & the camera review takes time

    Football too has play calling in the huddle breaks and, of course, flags too slow down the game.  Also, flag calls can be challenged & photo reviews take time. All this allows for rests. 

    Other than fouls & timeouts, basketball requires much more endurance running up & down the courts with not the same rest breaks as tennis & football; however, I think our team has sufficient quality backups that Shaq for example will need not play more than 1/2 a game(30 min and that's a lot). Wouldn't it have been nice to have him in Game 7 for just 10 minutes in the last QTR !  With the addition of West and I think we have one more position open and to get another point guard or small forward to relieve Pierce & Garnett will give us adequate competent backup.

    Regarding the Over-The- Hill- Gang :

    The average age of starters was 31 years old. However, Allen's strategy turned the Redskins around as the team improved to a 9-4-1 record in 1971, and finished the 1972 season with an NFC-best 11-3 record. The retooled Redskins' nine victories in 1971 was the most by a Washington team in 29 years. In his seven seasons with the club, Allen and his veterans produced seven winning records, five playoff appearances, and one trip to the Super Bowl.

    NEED I REMIND EVERYONE WE CAME WITHIN 4 POINTS OF BEING CHAMPS IN GAME 7 WITH THIS OLD TEAM.  

    AMEN !!!
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Before I start I wanted to say that as much as I dislike the Lakers, I am a fan of basketball, and was truly impressed & did root for Bynum in the FIBA world championship game yesterday as next to Durant's 28 he was the highest scorer with 15 but more than that his overall play was tremendously beneficial in the USA victory.


    So that I don't get any scathing comments from some Laker Trolls, I make the following disclaimer that I do not consider the same athleticism necessary in Basketball to be required in some of the following sports I mention below, Football (Punter), Baseball (Pitching) and Golf.

    But regarding age, I feel on a "Quid Pro Quo' basis, that many times a compensating factor for youth, agility, endurance etc. is the ability for an athlete to maintain one's physical capacity with increased training beyond the 30's and that even with a physical advantage with youth, the experience that comes with age can even the playing field. I'm a senior and remember some 40-50 years ago the saying that arriving at age 40 one becomes over-the-hill. I feel that that comment because of improvements in medicine & the desire for many to stay in shape can be increased by 10 years to say 50 years old, which for some can be the 1/2 way point in life.

    The Celtics have a deep team and not too many need play a whole game & with the quality of the backups, I do not see our team suffering a quality loss when we substitute fresh players frequently. In short, I do not feel age will be a limiting factor in our performance this coming season.
     
     
     
    There are many more but I cite a few below so you get the idea. I have copied some of the following from different websites for your edification.

    Hitting 32 years of age constitutes the twilight for the majority of athletes. Most competitors peak in their mid to late twenties, with only a few maintaining a high level of performance into their thirties. However, some athletes defy the calendar and continue to make an impact well into a time in their lives when most people consider them "over the hill."

    For those incredible athletes whose determination, skill, and genetic gifts allow them to compete at the top level into their late thirties and even into their forties, age is merely a state of mind.  Here's some who have tapped the fountain of youth and proved skeptics wrong by thriving among athletes young enough to be their offspring.


    --- BASKETBALL : Abdul-Jabbar retired from pro basketball at age 42.  At the time he held the record for most games played in the NBA & won two NBA championships in his 40's , but fellow aged big man Robert Parish eclipsed that mark following his final game in 1997 at age 43.

    Basketball has seen its share of "over the hill" players continue with effective careers into their forties. Besides Abdul-Jabbar and Parish, the most notable examples are ten-time NBA all-star John Stockton and two-time NBA MVP Karl Malone, both of whom excelled as members of the Utah Jazz before retiring in their early forties.

    ---FOOTBALL  :  Jerry Rice holds virtually every major receiving record there is to hold in addition to multi-position records like most touchdowns and most yards from scrimmage. Almost as remarkable as the number of records Rice holds is the fact that he played in the NFL until the age of 42. To have thrived at his position in as punishing a sport as football for that long is nearly unheard of.

    Brett Favre gives Rice a run for his money as the 40-year-old quarterback enters his 20th NFL season in 2010. Favre has had incredible success and remains an effective player in football's most important position into his third decade tossing the pigskin.
      
    George Blanda was a multi-position sensation into his forties and holds a football record for having played in four decades - the '40s, '50s, '60s, and '70s. Still more unusual by today's standards is the fact that Blanda acted as both quarterback and kicker for nearly every team he played on.  Blanda holds the record for being the oldest player ever to compete in the NFL, which he did as a 48-year-old. He was also the first player to score 2,000 points, often throwing a touchdown and then kicking his own extra point.

    Jeff Feagles, punter, comes close to Blanda's gridiron longevity, having debuted in 1988 and having played last in 2009 at the age of 44.  Feagles didn't miss a game in 22 consecutive seasons.

    Morten Andersen, kicker, enjoyed a career that began in 1982 and ended in 2007, when he was 47. Andersen holds the NFL record for most games played with 382.

    --- BASEBALL :    Nolan Ryan's name is synonymous with longevity and played pro ball from 1966 until his retirement in 1993 at age 46. Ryan was an eight-time all-star and a World Series champion. He played for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers, the latter three 
    of which have retired his jersey. He had a record seven no-hitters and 5,714 career strike outs.

    Pitching has been the domain of a few other 40+ baseball stars, including Randy Johnson, Jamie Moyer, and Phil Niekro, all of whom are or were forces to be reckoned with long after most of their contemporaries had left the game.

    Satchel Paige overcame racism to excel in the Major as he began his professional baseball career in the Negro leagues the year he turned 20. Following integration, Paige entered Major League Baseball as a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians in 1948.  He was a 42-year-old rookie, at the time the oldest player to debut in the Majors. Paige went on to become an all-star 
    with the St. Louis Browns.

    Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds are other baseball players who had extended careers, but their fountain of youth appears to have had as much to do with performance enhancing drugs as it has with their determination, skill, and genetics. Despite their considerable talent and longevity, their performance are tainted abit by use of drugs.

    --- BOXING : George Foreman  won the world title at 45 years old and became the oldest heavyweight champion of the world when he knocked out 26-year-old Michael Moorer. It was an incredible accomplishment in a career that included a world title 20 years earlier, as well as an Olympic gold medal in men's boxing at the 1968 Summer Games. Foreman fought his last match in November 1997 at age 48. He lost a controversial split decision to Shannon Briggs, which cost him a title shot.  Shortly thereafter, with an official record of 76-5, Foreman announced his retirement, the second and final one of his career.

    Boxing requires one of the most grueling training camps in sports, so for any fighter to be competing at a high level past the age of 40 is remarkable. Bernard Hopkins is one other notable pugilist who persisted in pummeling opponents when he had grown long in the tooth. Hopkins is still fighting at age 45, and, more remarkably, is still relevant in the boxing world.

    --- SWIMMING:  Dara Torres competed in five Olympics from 1984 to 2008 and has a remarkable story that includes 12 Olympic medals. But still more amazing is that three of those medals came at age 41, in her fifth Olympics, the 2008 Summer Games from Beijing. She did not compete in 1996 or 2004, 
    making her medal count in 2008 even more impressive. Torres is the picture of determination and dedication.

    --- TENNIS : Martina Navratilova turned pro in 1975 and won her first singles Grand Slam at Wimbledon in 1978.  She retired in 2006 just a month shy of her 50th birthday, but not before winning the mixed doubles title at the 2006 US Open, her 59th Grand Slam title.

    --- Martial Arts:  Randy Couture is pushing 50 and still taking on all comers. Some call him "Captain America," some call him "The Natural," but everyone calls him amazing.Couture got started in mixed martial arts in his thirties, after a  distinguished Greco-Roman wrestling career that saw him earn multiple Pan-Am medals. Including his MMA debut at UFC 13 in 1997, he's had 29 fights, winning 19 of them. Couture's most recent win came at age 47 in August 2010 when he defeated 42-year-old boxing legend James Toney by submission in a one-sided affair. Couture shows no signs of slowing down, and will be back in the octagon a few more times before he hangs up the gloves for good.

    --- HOCKEY : Gordie Howe has done it all. Gordie Howe's nickname of "Mr. Hockey" is the most apt moniker in the history of sports. Howe started his NHL career at age 18 in 1946. He retired at age 52 in 1980, the only player to have competed in five decades. He played a full 80-game season in his final year.  A record holder for both most NHL regular season games played 
    with 1,767 and most professional games played with 2,186 (his WHA and NHL totals combined), Howe has earned every accolade there is to earn in hockey. Among those are four Stanley Cups, six Hart Trophies as NHL MVP, and an incredible 23 NHL All-Star appearances.

    His name still pops up in games from time to time when a player records a "Gordie Howe Hat Trick" - a goal, an assist, and a fight in the same game. The term is a tribute to the legendary player who was both one of the most talented and one of the toughest players ever to lace up a pair of skates.

    The second oldest NHLer was defenseman Chris Chelios, who retired in 2010 at age 48. He was a member of the Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Blackhawks, and Montreal Canadiens, and remained a sought after blueliner until his final game. Chelios appeared in the playoffs a record 24 times, all but two of his 
    26 NHL seasons.

    --- GOLF:  Jack Nicklaus, the Golden Bear, is the greatest golfer of all and was a force to be reckoned with on the PGA Tour for the better part of three decades. Jack Nicklaus holds the record for the oldest player to win the Masters, which he did in 1986 at age 46. That big win extended his record for most major championships to 18, a record that still stands. "The Golden 
    Bear" also racked up 73 PGA Tour wins in his career, a number surpassed only by fellow legend Sam Snead. Never one to say die, Nicklaus continued competing in PGA events until the age of 65, when he played in both the Masters and The Open Championship.

    Fellow golf superstar Tom Watson might have made this list if he had pulled off a victory at the 2009 Open Championship. Instead, the 59-year-old Watson lost in a playoff, finishing second and thereby missing out on the chance to claim Nicklaus's record as the oldest player to win a major.

    Die heart fan as I am, now that the SOX are out, I do enjoy the PATRIOT'S & believe they'll be in the playoffs but I really can't wait for the CELTICS !!! 
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Bynum in the FIBA CHAMPS? I missed that one, did he do a brick and disappear? I wonder who the troll really is now lol.
     
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    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]Before I start I wanted to say that as much as I dislike the Lakers, I am a fan of basketball, and was truly impressed & did root for Bynum in the FIBA world championship game yesterday as next to Durant's 28 he was the highest scorer with 15 but more than that his overall play was tremendously beneficial in the USA victory. So that I don't get any scathing comments from some Laker Trolls, I make the following disclaimer that I do not consider the same athleticism necessary in Basketball to be required in some of the following sports I mention below, Football (Punter), Baseball (Pitching) and Golf. But regarding age, I feel on a "Quid Pro Quo' basis, that many times a compensating factor for youth, agility, endurance etc. is the ability for an athlete to maintain one's physical capacity with increased training beyond the 30's and that even with a physical advantage with youth, the experience that comes with age can even the playing field. I'm a senior and remember some 40-50 years ago the saying that arriving at age 40 one becomes over-the-hill. I feel that that comment because of improvements in medicine & the desire for many to stay in shape can be increased by 10 years to say 50 years old, which for some can be the 1/2 way point in life. The Celtics have a deep team and not too many need play a whole game & with the quality of the backups, I do not see our team suffering a quality loss when we substitute fresh players frequently. In short, I do not feel age will be a limiting factor in our performance this coming season.       There are many more but I cite a few below so you get the idea. I have copied some of the following from different websites for your edification. Hitting 32 years of age constitutes the twilight for the majority of athletes. Most competitors peak in their mid to late twenties, with only a few maintaining a high level of performance into their thirties. However, some athletes defy the calendar and continue to make an impact well into a time in their lives when most people consider them "over the hill." For those incredible athletes whose determination, skill, and genetic gifts allow them to compete at the top level into their late thirties and even into their forties, age is merely a state of mind.  Here's some who have tapped the fountain of youth and proved skeptics wrong by thriving among athletes young enough to be their offspring. ---  BASKETBALL  : Abdul-Jabbar retired from pro basketball at age 42.  At the time he held the record for most games played in the NBA & won two NBA championships in his 40's , but fellow aged big man Robert Parish eclipsed that mark following his final game in 1997 at age 43. Basketball has seen its share of "over the hill" players continue with effective careers into their forties. Besides Abdul-Jabbar and Parish, the most notable examples are ten-time NBA all-star John Stockton and two-time NBA MVP Karl Malone, both of whom excelled as members of the Utah Jazz before retiring in their early forties. --- FOOTBALL   :  Jerry Rice holds virtually every major receiving record there is to hold in addition to multi-position records like most touchdowns and most yards from scrimmage. Almost as remarkable as the number of records Rice holds is the fact that he played in the NFL until the age of 42. To have thrived at his position in as punishing a sport as football for that long is nearly unheard of. Brett Favre gives Rice a run for his money as the 40-year-old quarterback enters his 20th NFL season in 2010. Favre has had incredible success and remains an effective player in football's most important position into his third decade tossing the pigskin.    George Blanda was a multi-position sensation into his forties and holds a football record for having played in four decades - the '40s, '50s, '60s, and '70s. Still more unusual by today's standards is the fact that Blanda acted as both quarterback and kicker for nearly every team he played on.  Blanda holds the record for being the oldest player ever to compete in the NFL, which he did as a 48-year-old. He was also the first player to score 2,000 points, often throwing a touchdown and then kicking his own extra point. Jeff Feagles, punter, comes close to Blanda's gridiron longevity, having debuted in 1988 and having played last in 2009 at the age of 44.  Feagles didn't miss a game in 22 consecutive seasons. Morten Andersen, kicker, enjoyed a career that began in 1982 and ended in 2007, when he was 47. Andersen holds the NFL record for most games played with 382. ---  BASEBALL  :    Nolan Ryan's name is synonymous with longevity and played pro ball from 1966 until his retirement in 1993 at age 46. Ryan was an eight-time all-star and a World Series champion. He played for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers, the latter three  of which have retired his jersey. He had a record seven no-hitters and 5,714 career strike outs. Pitching has been the domain of a few other 40+ baseball stars, including Randy Johnson, Jamie Moyer, and Phil Niekro, all of whom are or were forces to be reckoned with long after most of their contemporaries had left the game. Satchel Paige overcame racism to excel in the Major as he began his professional baseball career in the Negro leagues the year he turned 20. Following integration, Paige entered Major League Baseball as a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians in 1948.  He was a 42-year-old rookie, at the time the oldest player to debut in the Majors. Paige went on to become an all-star  with the St. Louis Browns. Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds are other baseball players who had extended careers, but their fountain of youth appears to have had as much to do with performance enhancing drugs as it has with their determination, skill, and genetics. Despite their considerable talent and longevity, their performance are tainted abit by use of drugs. ---  BOXING  : George Foreman  won the world title at 45 years old and became the oldest heavyweight champion of the world when he knocked out 26-year-old Michael Moorer. It was an incredible accomplishment in a career that included a world title 20 years earlier, as well as an Olympic gold medal in men's boxing at the 1968 Summer Games. Foreman fought his last match in November 1997 at age 48. He lost a controversial split decision to Shannon Briggs, which cost him a title shot.  Shortly thereafter, with an official record of 76-5, Foreman announced his retirement, the second and final one of his career. Boxing requires one of the most grueling training camps in sports, so for any fighter to be competing at a high level past the age of 40 is remarkable. Bernard Hopkins is one other notable pugilist who persisted in pummeling opponents when he had grown long in the tooth. Hopkins is still fighting at age 45, and, more remarkably, is still relevant in the boxing world. ---  SWIMMING :  Dara Torres competed in five Olympics from 1984 to 2008 and has a remarkable story that includes 12 Olympic medals. But still more amazing is that three of those medals came at age 41, in her fifth Olympics, the 2008 Summer Games from Beijing. She did not compete in 1996 or 2004,  making her medal count in 2008 even more impressive. Torres is the picture of determination and dedication. ---  TENNIS  : Martina Navratilova turned pro in 1975 and won her first singles Grand Slam at Wimbledon in 1978.  She retired in 2006 just a month shy of her 50th birthday, but not before winning the mixed doubles title at the 2006 US Open, her 59th Grand Slam title. ---  Martial Arts :  Randy Couture is pushing 50 and still taking on all comers. Some call him "Captain America," some call him "The Natural," but everyone calls him amazing.Couture got started in mixed martial arts in his thirties, after a  distinguished Greco-Roman wrestling career that saw him earn multiple Pan-Am medals. Including his MMA debut at UFC 13 in 1997, he's had 29 fights, winning 19 of them. Couture's most recent win came at age 47 in August 2010 when he defeated 42-year-old boxing legend James Toney by submission in a one-sided affair. Couture shows no signs of slowing down, and will be back in the octagon a few more times before he hangs up the gloves for good. ---  HOCKEY  : Gordie Howe has done it all. Gordie Howe's nickname of "Mr. Hockey" is the most apt moniker in the history of sports. Howe started his NHL career at age 18 in 1946. He retired at age 52 in 1980, the only player to have competed in five decades. He played a full 80-game season in his final year.  A record holder for both most NHL regular season games played  with 1,767 and most professional games played with 2,186 (his WHA and NHL totals combined), Howe has earned every accolade there is to earn in hockey. Among those are four Stanley Cups, six Hart Trophies as NHL MVP, and an incredible 23 NHL All-Star appearances. His name still pops up in games from time to time when a player records a "Gordie Howe Hat Trick" - a goal, an assist, and a fight in the same game. The term is a tribute to the legendary player who was both one of the most talented and one of the toughest players ever to lace up a pair of skates. The second oldest NHLer was defenseman Chris Chelios, who retired in 2010 at age 48. He was a member of the Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Blackhawks, and Montreal Canadiens, and remained a sought after blueliner until his final game. Chelios appeared in the playoffs a record 24 times, all but two of his  26 NHL seasons. ---  GOLF :  Jack Nicklaus, the Golden Bear, is the greatest golfer of all and was a force to be reckoned with on the PGA Tour for the better part of three decades. Jack Nicklaus holds the record for the oldest player to win the Masters, which he did in 1986 at age 46. That big win extended his record for most major championships to 18, a record that still stands. "The Golden  Bear" also racked up 73 PGA Tour wins in his career, a number surpassed only by fellow legend Sam Snead. Never one to say die, Nicklaus continued competing in PGA events until the age of 65, when he played in both the Masters and The Open Championship. Fellow golf superstar Tom Watson might have made this list if he had pulled off a victory at the 2009 Open Championship. Instead, the 59-year-old Watson lost in a playoff, finishing second and thereby missing out on the chance to claim Nicklaus's record as the oldest player to win a major. Die heart fan as I am, now that the  SOX  are out, I do enjoy the  PATRIOT'S  & believe they'll be in the playoffs but I really can't wait for the  CELTICS !!!  
    Posted by mandobello[/QUOTE]

    Great post, but it was Odom, not Bynum.  I did wish him well in that game, he was not wearing the hideous purple and yellow.....anyone who wears Red, White and Blue needs our support........................but I think Durant and four stiffs could have beaten anyone, the kid is a beast!
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from KB24RULZ. Show KB24RULZ's posts

    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Mando- you might want to get your players right....next thing you'll have Lamar wearing that hideous green and white....uggggghhhhhh!!
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old : Great post, but it was Odom, not Bynum.  I did wish him well in that game, he was not wearing the hideous purple and yellow.....anyone who wears Red, White and Blue needs our support........................but I think Durant and four stiffs could have beaten anyone, the kid is a beast!
    Posted by BirdandCowens[/QUOTE]

    Maybe as a Septuagenarian, I may have to admit I'm getting a bit older. Yes, Mea Culpa, it was Lamar Odom.

    Couldn't agree with you more about Laker colors---remind me of some of the GAUDY uniforms worn by teams in the now defunct ABA league !!!

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from EliasB. Show EliasB's posts

    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Thank you Opie for your "comprehensive study" hope you didn't work too hard! But I think your hard work is incomplete. You see when Laker fans, Basketball fans in general, commentators and sportswriters say that the Celtics are old, what they are referring to is the main go-to guys on your team. When we talk about our team being much younger, we are referring to our go-to guys that make an impact on our team. One way to determine how valuable guys are to their team is by how much they are getting paid. Derek Fisher for example gets paid something like 2.5 or 3 million a year (I cannot remember which). My point is that he might hit big shots at times but he is no Kobe Bryant or Pau Gasol. His career average is only 9 points 3 assists a game.

    My point in bringing up Derek Fisher is not because I don't like D-fish but because whenever age stats come up, guys like you like to throw his age in with our guys as if he is an impact player - he is not. Derek Fisher is old, but the rest of our impact guys are at their prime!

    Unfortunately that is not the case for the Boston Celtics whose impact players are all on the downward tred of their careers. If you look at the ages of the "Big Three" or four best players on both our clubs you can see that there is in fact a considerable age difference:

    For both teams I looked at the ages that the Celtics will be at the end of this year and the ages the Lakers are NOW. (Why? I don't know? I'm just doing what Opie did :)

    Anyway, the big three Celtics are Pierce, Garnett and Ray Allen right?

    Pierce will be 33
    Garnett will be 35
    Ray Allen will be 35

    THESE are the Celtics main go to guys are they not?

    Cool

    Okay, now let's look at the Lakers main go to guys shall we?

    Kobe Bryant is 32
    Pau Gasol is 30
    Artest is 30

    Our next go to guy is Andrew Bynum who is 23.
    Your next go to guy is Rajon Rondo who will be 25.

    Our best bench player is Lamar Odom who is 30.
    Your best bench player is Shaq who is will be 39. LOL

    Anyway, it's much easier to see why NBA fans view the Celtics as old and the Lakers as a team that is at it's peak when you compare the ages of the impact players on each team and not just the overall age of the team.

    Hope that helps!

    Cool
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from P34. Show P34's posts

    Re: Celtics are too old is getting too old

    Why is there no mention of Theo Ratliff when he's also a Laker and he's 37 years old. Let's see, J.O'Neal, Shaq, Perkins, KG, and Davis versus Gasol, Bynum, Odom, and Theo Ratliff

    Shaq is only 38 years old because he was born in 1972. 

    HAHAHA!!!
     

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