If KG Retires Should His Jersey (#5) Be Hung In The Rafters?

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    Re: If KG Retires Should His Jersey (#5) Be Hung In The Rafters?

    In response to Skins and Heart's comment:

    Yes.

    The Timberwolves should retire #21 as well seeing he's the greatest player in the team history. 

    As others have said, the Celtics have retired a lot of numbers. Some more deserving than others. Lewis and Nelson come to mind. 

    Regarding Maxwell. He does have a finals MVP. And he did carry the Celtics in game 7 in 1984. Certainly does have a legitimate claim for being honoured by the Celtics. 

    Garnett is the reason for the Celtics being a play-off force again. All the success since 2008 can be attributed to Garnett. His very presence changed the team. Not too many guys have that sort of impact. Not only in a basketball sense. But he more importantly changed the mentality of the team. 

    I don't believe that Allen should have his number retired in Boston. Of the other Celtics from the era only Peirce is a lock for having his number retired.

    I'd love to see the Lakers retire Coopers number but I can't see it happening. Which is a genuine shame. 

     

     



    When I was a kid, I loved Maxwell.  He was my favorite player on the team.  He had a great post game and was an expert at drawing fouls.  He made a living at the free throw line and, yes, he was a big game performer.  In game 7 against the Lakers in 1984, it was Maxwell, not Bird, who carried the team.

    That said, Maxwell was also not known for his work ethic or as necessarily a positive influence in the locker room.  He was tight with cancers like Curtis Rowe and Sidney Wicks.  His career wasn't all that long.

    One of my favorite moments happened a few years ago.  The Indiana Pacers returned to Boston and a local sports station had an interview with Bird.  Maxwell was part of the panel and asked Bird about young players today and how they seemingly were not willing to work to develop their games.  Bird-without missing a beat- said, on live tv, "Shut up, Max.  You were the laziest player I ever met."....and he was serious - not a hint of a smile on his face.  You could tell he was annoyed by Maxwell.

    Did anyone see that great HBO special on Magic and Bird?  It was interesting when Bird recalled his first day at a Celtic practice.  The Celtics were coming off their worst season in decades...maybe ever.  He said he walked in and Curtis Rowe, Sidney Wicks, and Maxwell started saying things like, "Oh, here comes our white savior."  Wicks and Rowe didn't make it through the first practice - Red traded them.  Bird said, "....and then there was just Cedric."

    Maxwell strikes me as a phony now.  It killed Red to have his number retired.  I think Red had stated on many occassions that he would never retire Maxwell's number.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: If KG Retires Should His Jersey (#5) Be Hung In The Rafters?

    In response to teejaytee70's comment:

     

    In response to Skins and Heart's comment:

     

    Yes.

    The Timberwolves should retire #21 as well seeing he's the greatest player in the team history. 

    As others have said, the Celtics have retired a lot of numbers. Some more deserving than others. Lewis and Nelson come to mind. 

    Regarding Maxwell. He does have a finals MVP. And he did carry the Celtics in game 7 in 1984. Certainly does have a legitimate claim for being honoured by the Celtics. 

    Garnett is the reason for the Celtics being a play-off force again. All the success since 2008 can be attributed to Garnett. His very presence changed the team. Not too many guys have that sort of impact. Not only in a basketball sense. But he more importantly changed the mentality of the team. 

    I don't believe that Allen should have his number retired in Boston. Of the other Celtics from the era only Peirce is a lock for having his number retired.

    I'd love to see the Lakers retire Coopers number but I can't see it happening. Which is a genuine shame. 

     

     

     



    When I was a kid, I loved Maxwell.  He was my favorite player on the team.  He had a great post game and was an expert at drawing fouls.  He made a living at the free throw line and, yes, he was a big game performer.  In game 7 against the Lakers in 1984, it was Maxwell, not Bird, who carried the team.

     

    That said, Maxwell was also not known for his work ethic or as necessarily a positive influence in the locker room.  He was tight with cancers like Curtis Rowe and Sidney Wicks.  His career wasn't all that long.

    One of my favorite moments happened a few years ago.  The Indiana Pacers returned to Boston and a local sports station had an interview with Bird.  Maxwell was part of the panel and asked Bird about young players today and how they seemingly were not willing to work to develop their games.  Bird-without missing a beat- said, on live tv, "Shut up, Max.  You were the laziest player I ever met."....and he was serious - not a hint of a smile on his face.  You could tell he was annoyed by Maxwell.

    Did anyone see that great HBO special on Magic and Bird?  It was interesting when Bird recalled his first day at a Celtic practice.  The Celtics were coming off their worst season in decades...maybe ever.  He said he walked in and Curtis Rowe, Sidney Wicks, and Maxwell started saying things like, "Oh, here comes our white savior."  Wicks and Rowe didn't make it through the first practice - Red traded them.  Bird said, "....and then there was just Cedric."

    Maxwell strikes me as a phony now.  It killed Red to have his number retired.  I think Red had stated on many occassions that he would never retire Maxwell's number.

     



     

    SERIOUSLY, FOLKS . . . : Cedric Maxwell Leaves Some Bitterness Behind in Boston, Starts Anew With Clippers October 19, 1985|SAM McMANIS | Times Staff Write 

    For a guy who actually used to like being called Cornbread and who for many years was, without question, the most voluble player of the Boston Celtics, Cedric Maxwell seems rather concerned these days that many in the National Basketball Assn. don't take him seriously.

    Maybe it's because Maxwell has too much fun out there. His game face is an amused smirk, as if he knows something nobody else knows. He unabashedly enjoys entertaining reporters with his remarks, and he even admits that practice is something that is best avoided, if possible.


    Maxwell freely admits that he often plays the court jester, but he also maintains that he is misunderstood. It disturbs Maxwell that people remember him more for what he says than what he does on the court.

    He says he has felt this way almost his entire career, but it didn't bother him much until recently, when his successful--if somewhat overlooked--career hit the skids.

    These feelings surfaced early last spring, when the Celtics were well on the way to the NBA's best regular-season record, and it escalated into full-scale bitterness when the Celtics blamed him for their playoff loss to the Lakers.

    Maxwell, who had never missed more than four games since his rookie season, complained of soreness in his left knee and wanted some time off.

    The Celtics rolled their eyes. Sure, they had heard that one before.

    Eventually, though, arthroscopic surgery showed that Maxwell had a torn cartilage.

    Then when Maxwell failed to be a factor in the playoffs, Celtic President Red Auerbach said that Maxwell hadn't worked hard enough to rehabilitate himself and, worse, didn't care.

    Auerbach could not be reached for comment, but Celtic Coach K.C Jones said he feels bad that Maxwell's final days with Boston were so acrimonious. "I never question a player's injury, but others did," Jones said. "In my opinion, Max did the best he could to come back, but it wasn't good enough. Max had a lot of great years here, but decisions had to be made."

    By the time the Celtics sent Maxwell to the Clippers--"the Siberia of the NBA," he jokingly says--for center Bill Walton, Maxwell had a hurt that couldn't be repaired by any surgical procedure. He felt like a worn-out pair of shoes thrown to the back of the closet.

    When Maxwell learned that the Celtics, in Los Angeles this week to play exhibition games against the Lakers, were staying in the same hotel he was, he asked the Clippers if he could stay somewhere else.

    "I've never had my integrity questioned before," Maxwell said. "That hurt more than anything. And it came from people who knew me, knew my game, knew what I was all about.

    "I can be a happy-go-lucky person, and I have to admit that I don't work in practice as hard as I should. (But) I stated I was hurt and they just didn't believe me. For them to question it and say I didn't try, well, it was a bad situation.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: If KG Retires Should His Jersey (#5) Be Hung In The Rafters?

    In response to teejaytee70's comment:

    In response to Skins and Heart's comment:

     

    Yes.

    The Timberwolves should retire #21 as well seeing he's the greatest player in the team history. 

    As others have said, the Celtics have retired a lot of numbers. Some more deserving than others. Lewis and Nelson come to mind. 

    Regarding Maxwell. He does have a finals MVP. And he did carry the Celtics in game 7 in 1984. Certainly does have a legitimate claim for being honoured by the Celtics. 

    Garnett is the reason for the Celtics being a play-off force again. All the success since 2008 can be attributed to Garnett. His very presence changed the team. Not too many guys have that sort of impact. Not only in a basketball sense. But he more importantly changed the mentality of the team. 

    I don't believe that Allen should have his number retired in Boston. Of the other Celtics from the era only Peirce is a lock for having his number retired.

    I'd love to see the Lakers retire Coopers number but I can't see it happening. Which is a genuine shame. 

     

     

     



    When I was a kid, I loved Maxwell.  He was my favorite player on the team.  He had a great post game and was an expert at drawing fouls.  He made a living at the free throw line and, yes, he was a big game performer.  In game 7 against the Lakers in 1984, it was Maxwell, not Bird, who carried the team.

     

    That said, Maxwell was also not known for his work ethic or as necessarily a positive influence in the locker room.  He was tight with cancers like Curtis Rowe and Sidney Wicks.  His career wasn't all that long.

    One of my favorite moments happened a few years ago.  The Indiana Pacers returned to Boston and a local sports station had an interview with Bird.  Maxwell was part of the panel and asked Bird about young players today and how they seemingly were not willing to work to develop their games.  Bird-without missing a beat- said, on live tv, "Shut up, Max.  You were the laziest player I ever met."....and he was serious - not a hint of a smile on his face.  You could tell he was annoyed by Maxwell.

    Did anyone see that great HBO special on Magic and Bird?  It was interesting when Bird recalled his first day at a Celtic practice.  The Celtics were coming off their worst season in decades...maybe ever.  He said he walked in and Curtis Rowe, Sidney Wicks, and Maxwell started saying things like, "Oh, here comes our white savior."  Wicks and Rowe didn't make it through the first practice - Red traded them.  Bird said, "....and then there was just Cedric."

    Maxwell strikes me as a phony now.  It killed Red to have his number retired.  I think Red had stated on many occassions that he would never retire Maxwell's number.



    Red was sometimes crude and ever vengeful. Ask Cedric Maxwell. When Max took too long to recover from knee surgery in 1985, Red shipped him out of town (for Bill Walton), then had all positive Maxwell references deleted from an Auerbach book that was still in production. Downright Kremlinesque. It took two decades for Red to agree to let the Celtics retire Max's number.

     

     

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