ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet


    Envy, one of the 7 deadly sins and it got Hugh.   

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     



    Maybe ignoring relevant complexity and context perpetuates racism?  Lack of understanding of context certainly does. 

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    This might sound completely out of touch, but I truly haven't been following this Cooper story at all, was he in fact talking to a black guy when he screamed vulgarities?

    I guess the surprising part is there were black guys at a Kenny Chesney concert.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    Bottomline is Hugh got mad and hurled a couple of racist comments at Smith infront of a room full of people. Just as he tweeted to Cooper, well Hugh now at least we know. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to wozzy's comment:

    This might sound completely out of touch, but I truly haven't been following this Cooper story at all, was he in fact talking to a black guy when he screamed vulgarities?

    I guess the surprising part is there were black guys at a Kenny Chesney concert.



    Laughing

    I hear the security guard he was yelling at was black.  As I've said before, Cooper mostly just put himself in an awkward and embarrassing situation by revealing where his mind was in that situation.  It certainly makes his black teammates wonder what he's thinking beneath the surface when he looks at them.

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxfan94. Show redsoxfan94's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    wow mccoy is a bum for saying what he said. maybe he should know more about the girl before he gets her pregnant. its his own damn fault and he shouldnt be talking about the mother of his child like that. 

     

    as far as douglas goes, what he said doesnt surprise me. just goes to show the glaring double-standard in this country right now when it comes to race. you think espn will do anything to punish douglas for this? probobaly not.

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from NonChalant1. Show NonChalant1's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    I had to log in just because of how idiotic PatsEng and some others sound by saying that a black person calling another black person a house n-word is racist.  No, it's an insult.  It's calling them a sell out and someone subservient to others who is ashamed of their race.  That is not racist.  It's this type is misusing the word racist that allows the false equivalency and dodging and deflecting that goes on in society.  It's how people use the term "race card" to avoid responding to things that are actually racist.  They act like the person who brings up something that has racial connotations is automatically the racist one and it allows them to avoid dealing with the substance of what someone is saying.  It's lame. 

    People need to stop twisting the term racist for their own usage and to deflect to equate the actions of completely opposite actions.  I may be a person of color, but given schooling, most of my friends are white and they'd call you an idiot for saying that using the term uncle tom from one black person to another is "racist." By definition a racist is, "a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others."  Hugh Douglas is completely wrong, but to try to flip this situation into a way to defend the response to Riley Cooper is nonsense.  I'm happy your sort is the minority among my age group in New England.  

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxfan94. Show redsoxfan94's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

    I had to log in just because of how idiotic PatsEng and some others sound by saying that a black person calling another black person a house n-word is racist.  No, it's an insult.  It's calling them a sell out and someone subservient to others who is ashamed of their race.  That is not racist.  It's this type is misusing the word racist that allows the false equivalency and dodging and deflecting that goes on in society.  It's how people use the term "race card" to avoid responding to things that are actually racist.  They act like the person who brings up something that has racial connotations is automatically the racist one and it allows them to avoid dealing with the substance of what someone is saying.  It's lame. 

    People need to stop twisting the term racist for their own usage and to deflect to equate the actions of completely opposite actions.  I may be a person of color, but given schooling, most of my friends are white and they'd call you an idiot for saying that using the term uncle tom from one black person to another is "racist." By definition a racist is, "a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others."  Hugh Douglas is completely wrong, but to try to flip this situation into a way to defend the response to Riley Cooper is nonsense.  I'm happy your sort is the minority among my age group in New England.  



    calling someone an "uncle tom" is absolutely racist, it basically means that person doesnt act black enough for you. similar to what that idiot on espn said about RG3, calling him a "cornball brother". clearly all three of these people made mistakes in what they said, cooper and parker apologized and were punished. hopefully the same is true for douglas.

     

    obviously what douglas said isnt as bad as what cooper said, in context. but still, its a dumb thing to say and he should be docked in some way for it. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from NonChalant1. Show NonChalant1's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     



    This time of arrogance and privilege is why race relations won't get better in this country.  No one has any right to tell another group of people, particularly a minority group what they should or should not be offended by.  If you cannot get past that basic barometer of respect and understanding then race relations will never get better.  I have no right to tell a female what she should or should not be offended by.  I am not a female, and I am not in her position.  The best I can do is empathize.  This arrogant belief that, "if you say it, so can I say and you said it so you have no right to be upset about me saying it" sounds like the logic of a fourth grader.  It is the argument that I call my friends idiots all the time so that someone without that connection to us can say the same thing and we won't look at them funny.  As if there isn't an entire history and back and context that allows for that term to pass freely among us.  The question every person of color has is why people who are not of color want to say racial slurs so bad.  I have never been bothered by my Asian friends jokingly referring to themselves as such (see Jeremy Lin's AIM screen name), nor my Jewish friends, or Hispanic friends, etc.  I personally don't regularly use terms like that and don't do it around most people because it makes things awkward.  However, I am never bothered that I cannot use a communal word.  

    It just screams of wanting to have ownership over everything.  The logic that the usage of a word that came after racism, and existed throughout the most racist times in our history somehow "causes" racism is ridiculous.  This just sounds like whining about not being able to say something.  Racism is a white person being more likely to be caught with drugs on them in NY but black people being twice as likely to be stopped.  Racism is the average black person getting a longer sentence for the same crime as a white person.  Racism is the odds of getting a job as a white person with a criminal record being the same as the average black person without one.  That is racism.  Those are the underlying unresolved racial issues of our society.  Whining about people being offended if someone who does not share their cultural using a word pales in comparison.   This victimization is astounding. 

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from nyjetssuc. Show nyjetssuc's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to DanishPastry's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     



    Yes, life is complex.  Things aren't quite as simplistic as you portray them.  Context does matter with language.  Every linguist will tell you that . . . 

     

     

     



    I totally agree. The word in and of itself may be derogatory, but howit is used can change the way it is perceived. But the relationship between messenger and recipient also factores in. Every time I meet one of my friends we say hi by calling each other a very derogatory word. It's okay between him and me, but would be totally out of order in any other setting.

     

    In all communication it is important to remember, that it is the recipient who determines then content of the message. If a message is ill received, the messenger has a problem - not the recipient.

    That is why communication is a hard thing.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    It's also why slang words, developed by those who don't truly care for those they intend to demeen by those slang words, should not be used by anyone, ever, even if by a person of one "group" to members of the same "group"...African-Americans shouldn't ever call other African-Americans the N word, Irish should never call each other M**k, Italians should never call each other W*p, etc...it's subject to far too much controversy and is a sign those engaging in the practice need to read "Ms. Manners".

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from NonChalant1. Show NonChalant1's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to redsoxfan94's comment:

     

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

     

     

     

    I had to log in just because of how idiotic PatsEng and some others sound by saying that a black person calling another black person a house n-word is racist.  No, it's an insult.  It's calling them a sell out and someone subservient to others who is ashamed of their race.  That is not racist.  It's this type is misusing the word racist that allows the false equivalency and dodging and deflecting that goes on in society.  It's how people use the term "race card" to avoid responding to things that are actually racist.  They act like the person who brings up something that has racial connotations is automatically the racist one and it allows them to avoid dealing with the substance of what someone is saying.  It's lame. 

    People need to stop twisting the term racist for their own usage and to deflect to equate the actions of completely opposite actions.  I may be a person of color, but given schooling, most of my friends are white and they'd call you an idiot for saying that using the term uncle tom from one black person to another is "racist." By definition a racist is, "a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others."  Hugh Douglas is completely wrong, but to try to flip this situation into a way to defend the response to Riley Cooper is nonsense.  I'm happy your sort is the minority among my age group in New England.  

     

     



    calling someone an "uncle tom" is absolutely racist, it basically means that person doesnt act black enough for you. similar to what that idiot on espn said about RG3, calling him a "cornball brother". clearly all three of these people made mistakes in what they said, cooper and parker apologized and were punished. hopefully the same is true for douglas.

     

     

     

    obviously what douglas said isnt as bad as what cooper said, in context. but still, its a dumb thing to say and he should be docked in some way for it. 

     



    You have no business telling an African-American what is or is not racist among their own community.  You sound ridiculous.  Once again, you morph the word racist to fit your definition because it carries a heavier and more vile connotation.  Calling someone an oreo, banana, or the various other terms that mean someone does not identify with their own culture are not racist.  It does not speak to racial superiority or hatred of another race.  What you are doing is partaking in the evaluation of one's "asian-ness" or something along those lines which is offensive often times because it involves stereotyping what you think someone of a similar background to you should act like.  But it's not racist.  If anything, it's being upset that one is not acting according to what you feel someone of your racial background (which you love) should act like.  Further, historically and presently, the term often has bearing.  It is frequently lodged at people who partake in the practice of denigrating and disowning all people of their own racial background.  People who hate what they are so they bleach their skin, or get eye surgeries, or things of that sort.  People who hate who they are and anyone who shares that racial background even though obviously people do not have to be, and should not be defined by their race (though especially as a minority it is part of your identity).  Think of Dave Chapelle's "Black White Supremacist" skit, that type of person is who that term is frequently lodged at (and ignorantly act educated people of color by others at times...I know, I've been the victim) and there's nothing racist about what it's being tossed that way. 

     

    By the way, I'm not defending Douglas' stupidity.  I was just arguing against the way people are defining racism.  Douglas is in the wrong and should probably be fired.  Or he would be if it were me. 

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxfan94. Show redsoxfan94's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     

     



    This time of arrogance and privilege is why race relations won't get better in this country.  No one has any right to tell another group of people, particularly a minority group what they should or should not be offended by.  If you cannot get past that basic barometer of respect and understanding then race relations will never get better.  I have no right to tell a female what she should or should not be offended by.  I am not a female, and I am not in her position.  The best I can do is empathize.  This arrogant belief that, "if you say it, so can I say and you said it so you have no right to be upset about me saying it" sounds like the logic of a fourth grader.  It is the argument that I call my friends idiots all the time so that someone without that connection to us can say the same thing and we won't look at them funny.  As if there isn't an entire history and back and context that allows for that term to pass freely among us.  The question every person of color has is why people who are not of color want to say racial slurs so bad.  I have never been bothered by my Asian friends jokingly referring to themselves as such (see Jeremy Lin's AIM screen name), nor my Jewish friends, or Hispanic friends, etc.  I personally don't regularly use terms like that and don't do it around most people because it makes things awkward.  However, I am never bothered that I cannot use a communal word.  

     

    It just screams of wanting to have ownership over everything.  The logic that the usage of a word that came after racism, and existed throughout the most racist times in our history somehow "causes" racism is ridiculous.  This just sounds like whining about not being able to say something.  Racism is a white person being more likely to be caught with drugs on them in NY but black people being twice as likely to be stopped.  Racism is the average black person getting a longer sentence for the same crime as a white person.  Racism is the odds of getting a job as a white person with a criminal record being the same as the average black person without one.  That is racism.  Those are the underlying unresolved racial issues of our society.  Whining about people being offended if someone who does not share their cultural using a word pales in comparison.   This victimization is astounding. 

    [/QUOTE]

    you hypocrite!!...you just told muzwell he was whining and then you go on whining about how blacks are treated unfairly. give me a break.... there are plenty of successful people of every color, if you work hard there is a very high chance you will succeed. 

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from nyjetssuc. Show nyjetssuc's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

    In response to redsoxfan94's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    I had to log in just because of how idiotic PatsEng and some others sound by saying that a black person calling another black person a house n-word is racist.  No, it's an insult.  It's calling them a sell out and someone subservient to others who is ashamed of their race.  That is not racist.  It's this type is misusing the word racist that allows the false equivalency and dodging and deflecting that goes on in society.  It's how people use the term "race card" to avoid responding to things that are actually racist.  They act like the person who brings up something that has racial connotations is automatically the racist one and it allows them to avoid dealing with the substance of what someone is saying.  It's lame. 

    People need to stop twisting the term racist for their own usage and to deflect to equate the actions of completely opposite actions.  I may be a person of color, but given schooling, most of my friends are white and they'd call you an idiot for saying that using the term uncle tom from one black person to another is "racist." By definition a racist is, "a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others."  Hugh Douglas is completely wrong, but to try to flip this situation into a way to defend the response to Riley Cooper is nonsense.  I'm happy your sort is the minority among my age group in New England.  

     

     



    calling someone an "uncle tom" is absolutely racist, it basically means that person doesnt act black enough for you. similar to what that idiot on espn said about RG3, calling him a "cornball brother". clearly all three of these people made mistakes in what they said, cooper and parker apologized and were punished. hopefully the same is true for douglas.

     

     

     

    obviously what douglas said isnt as bad as what cooper said, in context. but still, its a dumb thing to say and he should be docked in some way for it. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    You have no business telling an African-American what is or is not racist among their own community.  You sound ridiculous.  Once again, you morph the word racist to fit your definition because it carries a heavier and more vile connotation.  Calling someone an oreo, banana, or the various other terms that mean someone does not identify with their own culture are not racist.  It does not speak to racial superiority or hatred of another race.  What you are doing is partaking in the evaluation of one's "asian-ness" or something along those lines which is offensive often times because it involves stereotyping what you think someone of a similar background to you should act like.  But it's not racist.  If anything, it's being upset that one is not acting according to what you feel someone of your racial background (which you love) should act like.  Further, historically and presently, the term often has bearing.  It is frequently lodged at people who partake in the practice of denigrating and disowning all people of their own racial background.  People who hate what they are so they bleach their skin, or get eye surgeries, or things of that sort.  People who hate who they are and anyone who shares that racial background even though obviously people do not have to be, and should not be defined by their race (though especially as a minority it is part of your identity).  Think of Dave Chapelle's "Black White Supremacist" skit, that type of person is who that term is frequently lodged at (and ignorantly act educated people of color by others at times...I know, I've been the victim) and there's nothing racist about what it's being tossed that way. 

     

    [/QUOTE]
    You can find people of any race able to discern the reasons why it's ok to refer to each other in slang terms that were originally devised to be belittling and insulting...I understand that...so isn't it more self uplifting and humane to simply never use those terms? I mean, for every Dave Chapelle you have a Maya Angelou who doesn't care for one African-American person referring to another African-American as an N-word....and I'm sure you'll find that divide among all racial and religious groups...so just don't use those terms...IMO

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxfan94. Show redsoxfan94's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

    In response to redsoxfan94's comment:

     

    In response to NonChalant1's comment:

     

     

     

    I had to log in just because of how idiotic PatsEng and some others sound by saying that a black person calling another black person a house n-word is racist.  No, it's an insult.  It's calling them a sell out and someone subservient to others who is ashamed of their race.  That is not racist.  It's this type is misusing the word racist that allows the false equivalency and dodging and deflecting that goes on in society.  It's how people use the term "race card" to avoid responding to things that are actually racist.  They act like the person who brings up something that has racial connotations is automatically the racist one and it allows them to avoid dealing with the substance of what someone is saying.  It's lame. 

    People need to stop twisting the term racist for their own usage and to deflect to equate the actions of completely opposite actions.  I may be a person of color, but given schooling, most of my friends are white and they'd call you an idiot for saying that using the term uncle tom from one black person to another is "racist." By definition a racist is, "a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others."  Hugh Douglas is completely wrong, but to try to flip this situation into a way to defend the response to Riley Cooper is nonsense.  I'm happy your sort is the minority among my age group in New England.  

     

     



    calling someone an "uncle tom" is absolutely racist, it basically means that person doesnt act black enough for you. similar to what that idiot on espn said about RG3, calling him a "cornball brother". clearly all three of these people made mistakes in what they said, cooper and parker apologized and were punished. hopefully the same is true for douglas.

     

     

     

    obviously what douglas said isnt as bad as what cooper said, in context. but still, its a dumb thing to say and he should be docked in some way for it. 

     



    You have no business telling an African-American what is or is not racist among their own community.  You sound ridiculous.  Once again, you morph the word racist to fit your definition because it carries a heavier and more vile connotation.  Calling someone an oreo, banana, or the various other terms that mean someone does not identify with their own culture are not racist.  It does not speak to racial superiority or hatred of another race.  What you are doing is partaking in the evaluation of one's "asian-ness" or something along those lines which is offensive often times because it involves stereotyping what you think someone of a similar background to you should act like.  But it's not racist.  If anything, it's being upset that one is not acting according to what you feel someone of your racial background (which you love) should act like.  Further, historically and presently, the term often has bearing.  It is frequently lodged at people who partake in the practice of denigrating and disowning all people of their own racial background.  People who hate what they are so they bleach their skin, or get eye surgeries, or things of that sort.  People who hate who they are and anyone who shares that racial background even though obviously people do not have to be, and should not be defined by their race (though especially as a minority it is part of your identity).  Think of Dave Chapelle's "Black White Supremacist" skit, that type of person is who that term is frequently lodged at (and ignorantly act educated people of color by others at times...I know, I've been the victim) and there's nothing racist about what it's being tossed that way. 

     

    By the way, I'm not defending Douglas' stupidity.  I was just arguing against the way people are defining racism.  Douglas is in the wrong and should probably be fired.  Or he would be if it were me. 

     



    if you want to say its not racism, thats fine. thats your opinion and i respect that. however, like you said, there is no place for that in our society. espescially at a time now with what has gone on with riley cooper, the trayvon martin case. it seems as if the races are now getting more divided than they are getting closer. its a shame, but with how passionate people are about their views, it is going to happen. like what you said about people using the "N" word as a term of endearment towards fellow blacks. yes i think its wrong for someone of another race to call a black person by such a word, but if blacks really dont want to hear it used like that, they should stop saying it every other word. and i know not all blacks are like this, it just seems there are too many who are. 

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from JulesWinfield. Show JulesWinfield's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     



    Very well put!  Anyone who endorses black usage of the word (in rap songs, playfully, etc.) is just making excuses for what we all know is wrong.  I agree with Oprah (maybe one of the first times she's been referenced on this forum!) - she believes the word should be removed from the English language through disuse.  She stared daggers at Chris Rock and others when they tossed it out on her show...

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGrGwhoN0K8

    Context...

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from nyjetssuc. Show nyjetssuc's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     




    BINGO to that sir!

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:




    Did they have separate washrooms for Irish people in the US in 1960? The "n" word and other derogatory words for blacks that were accepted as "normal" by the majority were part of a systematic and pervasive system of discrimination that held blacks in an inferior status for centuries, that continued until at least the 1960s, and that continues to have residual negative effects in the black community in the US. 

     

    Yeah, everyone knows the English treated the Irish very badly.  But that's not recent American history.  And, please, don't pull this "the Irish are victims" thing in an American context.  There were Irish mayors in major American cities before most blacks could vote in the South or get decent jobs anywhere, North or South.  

     



    no they just killed them if they walked into the noblemans house without permission from 1100-1700 but I'm sure the separate washrooms were worse. But then again, during the civil war the North and South must have used wave after wave of black soldiers armed with poor weapons and no protection as human sheilds to protect the white soldiers in wars that lasted for centuries at a time right?

    So just because it wasn't as recent it's not as important? are you kidding me? Millions upon millions of my countrymen killed over 600 years vs 150yrs of slavery and another 100years of oppression, yeah they are about equal. And saying the english treated the irish very bad is like saying white southerns treated black people not so nicely. Don't down play how bad it was Pro. Just because one was more recent doesn't make it worse. Both were extremely bad and should never happen but trying to down play one over the other because one was more recent is awful. Especially, when you generalize all whites when the vast majority of white people in the US never owned slaves in their family history and most never even took part in any racist movements.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from passfirst. Show passfirst's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to TFB12's comment:

     

    I think it is funny and extremely foolish of LeSean McCoy to say he can't respect teammate Riley Cooper because of this yet LeSean McCoy went to twitter and tweeted these vile comments to his baby mama..

     

    McCoy said the mother of his child was a "Broke bum" and a "nobody" who was trying to make her name off their son and told his followers to "Tell @Angelface0330 to get a job n stop begging for child support money she a BUM needs me to LIVE sad!!!"

    He also said "I hit u n a week without knowing ya name .. My son the only reason u have a life u broke stop frontn on IG ...U BUM."

    I think it is probably safe to say that not many people respect the dirt bag LeSean McCoy!

     

    ---------------------------------------------

    "Being the best doesn't mean you always win. It just means you win more than anybody else."  Text received by Tom Brady from Kurt Warner after Ravens loss.


    view my Patriots photoshops at patsfanfotoshop.tumblr.com





     




     

     It's weird because there are players throughout the NFL that share a locker room with teammates who've been convicted of beeting their wife.  But I've never heard of guys needing to "process" that situation.  Yet a "word", as trashy and scarring as it is, is scutinized to a greater extent by teammates then someone who beets their wife.

     And these are teammates who have likely spouted racial slurs of their own.  Hate filled anti-white slurs, that, while certainly not as paralizing, or qualify as "fighting words", are filled with just as much venom from the person spewing it.    

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to passfirst's comment:

    In response to TFB12's comment:

     

    I think it is funny and extremely foolish of LeSean McCoy to say he can't respect teammate Riley Cooper because of this yet LeSean McCoy went to twitter and tweeted these vile comments to his baby mama..

     

    McCoy said the mother of his child was a "Broke bum" and a "nobody" who was trying to make her name off their son and told his followers to "Tell @Angelface0330 to get a job n stop begging for child support money she a BUM needs me to LIVE sad!!!"

    He also said "I hit u n a week without knowing ya name .. My son the only reason u have a life u broke stop frontn on IG ...U BUM."

    I think it is probably safe to say that not many people respect the dirt bag LeSean McCoy!

     

    ---------------------------------------------

    "Being the best doesn't mean you always win. It just means you win more than anybody else."  Text received by Tom Brady from Kurt Warner after Ravens loss.


    view my Patriots photoshops at patsfanfotoshop.tumblr.com





     




     

     It's weird because there are players throughout the NFL that share a locker room with teammates who've been convicted of beeting their wife.  But I've never heard of guys needing to "process" that situation.  Yet a "word", as trashy and scarring as it is, is scutinized to a greater extent by teammates then someone who beets their wife.

     And these are teammates who have likely spouted racial slurs of their own.  Hate filled anti-white slurs, that, while certainly not as paralizing, or qualify as "fighting words", are filled with just as much venom from the person spewing it.    




    I agree.  And while I think it is an ugly word and Cooper was in the wrong, this situation clearly is being overplayed by a lot of people, imo. 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from NonChalant1. Show NonChalant1's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to APpats21's comment:

    It is a double standard and that's what people need to understand. I guess i'm in the minority, if black people say it i'm fine with it. You say what you wanna say. I mean I even say it. It's a word and as long as you're not using it in a manner to attack someone then it's not bad. I'm Puerto Rican and i've faced ALOT of racism growing up but I don't consider saying it as racist. It depends on the context. I've had friends come up to me and be like, "yo sp*ck", wetb@ck, or the million other things that can be said for Hispanics. If they were my friends and I knew they were joking then it's fine. If I didn't know them or if I knew it was derogatory then it was a problem. I guess it's the way you grow up. Most of my older brother's friends were black so I used to hear it alot and all through high school everyone used it. Even white people. There wasn't really anything wrong with it because it wasn't in an attacking manner and we all knew each other.



    That's the key point.  People sometimes selectively let it go if you've become friends with them to a point where that stuff is irrelevant.  But that isn't a default position.  It's something a lot of these guys don't get.  It's that special relationship you had with them that made it fine.  

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from DanishPastry. Show DanishPastry's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to nyjetssuc's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    I don't need a linguist to tell me what's vulgar. The word is vulgar, period. If people stopped using the word altogether, it would disappear just like thousands of vulgarities before it.

    If a word is OK to use, then nobody has the right to tell me I can't use it because I'm not of the same skin pigmentation.  If Hugh Douglas can get away with calling someone a "house n----" then Mark Schlereth should be able to as well, if he were so inclined.

    Just because people behave ignorantly and it's somehow acceptable because of the "context" doesn't make the behavior any less ignorant. Tolerating double standards perpetuates racism. It's what got us to this point in the first place.

     

     




    BINGO to that sir!

     



    Well, we will all stop using derogatory words around the same time Hell freezes over, pigs fly, and the Jets win the Super Bowl. Ain't gonna happen! Of course the N-word is vulgar by itself. But vulgarity is commonplace. The question is if it is racist. And that depends on context. Who says it, to whom, and under which circumstances.

    Let's deal with how the language is actually used. And saying context doesn't matter is almost willfully wrong. For comparison, is 20 TDs in a season good or bad for a QB? Well, if you're Mark Sanchez it's great, but if you're Tom Brady it sucks. The context ties into the perception of the exact same performance. Why should it be any different with language, which is infinately more complex than sports?

     

     

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