Former Lions lineman admits he let his QB get injured on purpose

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    Re: Former Lions lineman admits he let his QB get injured on purpose

    In response to trouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ccnsd's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Doesn't matter if Krieg was better than Mitchell. Glad Lomas did not serve in the military. Letting your brother down is always wrong in a battle, football or real life.

    [/QUOTE]What nonsense! I'm guessing you didn't serve in 'Nam. If some a--hole 2nd Lt wanted to grab some glory by getting guys killed he needed to be wised up.


    [/QUOTE]

    Damn right i did not serve in Nam. I served later.  Any soldier or Marine who killed an NCO or officer for doing their job is a loser. I never heard anyone even joke about it. The great army we had in 1965 was a disgrace by 1973. The military by the end of the Vietnam war was a shell of it's former self. Filled with drug addicts , unhappy draftees and racial strife. The rebuilding and rebranding of the american military in the late 1970's and 1980's was one of the greatest success stories of our time. That's not to say there weren't great soldiers and Marines in 1973 because there obviously were, these were the guys that rebuilt the US military to the peak it's at today. Getting a teammate hurt and perhaps paralyzed for life because he threw an interception is a disgrace. I'm off my soapbox now, but thinking it's coolor funny to murder an NCO or officer does not sit well with me. Incompetent officers and NCO's can be replaced and they constantly are. Incompetent Generals, not so much.

     
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    Re: Former Lions lineman admits he let his QB get injured on purpose

    What a POS this clown is.He failed as a football player ,a teammate and a human being by allowing his QB to get injured purposely.He doesn't know the difference between right and wrong at the most basic level.

    Another point was brought up by a yahoo.com article:

    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/lomas-brown-s-admission-of-trying-to-get-teammate-hurt-makes-him-terrible-plaintiff-in-suit-vs--nfl-233220147.html

    Of all the questions that former Detroit Lion Lomas Brown is facing in the wake of admitting he once allowed an opponent to get a free shot on his own quarterback, Scott Mitchell, in the hope Mitchell would be injured, this might be the most uncomfortable:

    How does a player who admits he blatantly attempted to put his own teammate's health at risk continue to sue the NFL for putting its players' health at risk? 

    Brown and his wife, Wendy, are part of a group that sued the NFL in April 2012 in Georgia state court seeking compensatory and punitive damages for "the NFL's failure to face the truth" about concussions and the violent nature of football.

    "This action seeks compensatory damages from the NFL to compensate Plaintiffs for their injuries; punitive damages to punish the NFL for its willful misconduct; and equitable relief for the detection and treatment of latent injuries," the suit, filed in Fulton County demands

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from trouts. Show trouts's posts

    Re: Former Lions lineman admits he let his QB get injured on purpose

    In response to ccnsd's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to trouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ccnsd's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Doesn't matter if Krieg was better than Mitchell. Glad Lomas did not serve in the military. Letting your brother down is always wrong in a battle, football or real life.

    [/QUOTE]What nonsense! I'm guessing you didn't serve in 'Nam. If some a--hole 2nd Lt wanted to grab some glory by getting guys killed he needed to be wised up.


    [/QUOTE]

    Damn right i did not serve in Nam. I served later.  Any soldier or Marine who killed an NCO or officer for doing their job is a loser. I never heard anyone even joke about it. The great army we had in 1965 was a disgrace by 1973. The military by the end of the Vietnam war was a shell of it's former self. Filled with drug addicts , unhappy draftees and racial strife. The rebuilding and rebranding of the american military in the late 1970's and 1980's was one of the greatest success stories of our time. That's not to say there weren't great soldiers and Marines in 1973 because there obviously were, these were the guys that rebuilt the US military to the peak it's at today. Getting a teammate hurt and perhaps paralyzed for life because he threw an interception is a disgrace. I'm off my soapbox now, but thinking it's coolor funny to murder an NCO or officer does not sit well with me. Incompetent officers and NCO's can be replaced and they constantly are. Incompetent Generals, not so much.

    [/QUOTE] For the most part, it wasn't NCOs that got fragged in Nam it was 2nd Lts, usually just out of ROTC. These were the wet-behind-the-ears, morons who took over platoons full of guys who had lots of combat experience and consistently put their lives in danger. You do a disservice to Vietnam Vets who put their lives on the line in the service of their country, when you dismiss them as a bunch of "drug addicts" and "unhappy draftees". Over 55,000 of those guys that you dismiss didn't come home and the ones that did certainly don't deserve your scorn. If things are so perfect with today's "professional soldiers" how come you have troops pissing on dead bodies, Abu Ghraib, and guys being tried for massacres that involved the killing children and civilians. You sound like one of the gung-ho, officer know-it-alls that were so common over there, especially during the first 7 or 8 years of the war. Some of them came home messed up. It was called collateral damage and it probably saved quite a few lives.

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ccnsd. Show ccnsd's posts

    Re: Former Lions lineman admits he let his QB get injured on purpose

    In response to trouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ccnsd's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to trouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ccnsd's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Doesn't matter if Krieg was better than Mitchell. Glad Lomas did not serve in the military. Letting your brother down is always wrong in a battle, football or real life.

    [/QUOTE]What nonsense! I'm guessing you didn't serve in 'Nam. If some a--hole 2nd Lt wanted to grab some glory by getting guys killed he needed to be wised up.


    [/QUOTE]

    Damn right i did not serve in Nam. I served later.  Any soldier or Marine who killed an NCO or officer for doing their job is a loser. I never heard anyone even joke about it. The great army we had in 1965 was a disgrace by 1973. The military by the end of the Vietnam war was a shell of it's former self. Filled with drug addicts , unhappy draftees and racial strife. The rebuilding and rebranding of the american military in the late 1970's and 1980's was one of the greatest success stories of our time. That's not to say there weren't great soldiers and Marines in 1973 because there obviously were, these were the guys that rebuilt the US military to the peak it's at today. Getting a teammate hurt and perhaps paralyzed for life because he threw an interception is a disgrace. I'm off my soapbox now, but thinking it's coolor funny to murder an NCO or officer does not sit well with me. Incompetent officers and NCO's can be replaced and they constantly are. Incompetent Generals, not so much.

    [/QUOTE] For the most part, it wasn't NCOs that got fragged in Nam it was 2nd Lts, usually just out of ROTC. These were the wet-behind-the-ears, morons who took over platoons full of guys who had lots of combat experience and consistently put their lives in danger. You do a disservice to Vietnam Vets who put their lives on the line in the service of their country, when you dismiss them as a bunch of "drug addicts" and "unhappy draftees". Over 55,000 of those guys that you dismiss didn't come home and the ones that did certainly don't deserve your scorn. If things are so perfect with today's "professional soldiers" how come you have troops pissing on dead bodies, Abu Ghraib, and guys being tried for massacres that involved the killing children and civilians. You sound like one of the gung-ho, officer know-it-alls that were so common over there, especially during the first 7 or 8 years of the war. Some of them came home messed up. It was called collateral damage and it probably saved quite a few lives.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Murdering officers  and NCO's is collateral damage in your opinion? Give me a freaking break. Don't just watch the movies about it, study the Army's own self evaluations of the war. Society's breakdown of the late 1960's permeated the Army. Drug use was rampant in the early 1970's Army. They 1965 Army was perhaps the greatest in history. The 1973 Army was a relative disgrace. There were still great soldiers in it (read my post) and those were the ones that rebuilt in the late 1970's. I served with many Vietnam vets. All of them, (yes every single one I served with) said the same thing. The 1970's military was a mess. The elite unit's were undoubtedly still great but the mainstream military in the early 1970's had huge problems. Morale was terrible, there was racial strife and drugs were everywhere. Read about the Peers comission which investigated the breakdown in Army discipline in the late 1960's and early 1970's. There were actually military newspapers that promoted the murdering of officers during the war. How come in world war 1 and world war 2 which were much bloodier the ratio of fraggings were dramatically lower. There was actually a $10,000 bounty put on an officer once during the vietnam war (this officer actually survived several attempts). Some officer's recieved frag warnings (smoke grenades in their hootch) before ever leading their men into battle. Search and evade became a way of life for many units. If the military had felt like you did it would not be the military we have today, which is outstanding, and is much better than the one I served in.

     

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