National Tragedy League

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    National Tragedy League

    Competition for positions is intense, Careers are short, marked by violent hits resulting in injuries, concussions and emotional trauma along with serious prescription drug use/abuse/addiction. And players have an extremely difficult time adjusting to society afterward.

    Seriously, who would you recommend this to?

    The list of tragedies continues... Seau is only the latest, there will be many more...

    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/former-qb-lucas-hopes-tale-095148944--nfl.html

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Runer. Show Runer's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    Risk vs. Reward

    These guys make more in one year than some people will make in a lifetime. Risk vs. Reward. Don't like the risk? Go get a 9 to 5 job like everyone else and make pennies compared to what you can make in the league. Life is full of choices. Nobody is forcing anyone to play football.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    Money, status, fame and the rush of intense physical competition in the moment have replaced common sense and a healthy physical and emotional well being. All this supported by a league and owners who profit from it and fans like us who live vicariously from it. We're all guilty. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MoreRings. Show MoreRings's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Risk vs. Reward These guys make more in one year than some people will make in a lifetime. Risk vs. Reward. Don't like the risk? Go get a 9 to 5 job like everyone else and make pennies compared to what you can make in the league. Life is full of choices. Nobody is forcing anyone to play football.
    Posted by Runer[/QUOTE]

    Yup, tough to feel bad for them sometimes.  The smart ones
    seem to live away from the limelight. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : Yup, tough to feel bad for them sometimes.  The smart ones seem to live away from the limelight. 
    Posted by MoreRings[/QUOTE]

    So what would you do? Take the money, fame/limelight if you knew there was going to be a high probability you would be physically and emotionally traumatized, depressed, drug addicted and unable to fit back into society after your career ended?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from hardright. Show hardright's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    It would be interesting to study how many "football-related" deaths, suicides, etc., occurred during the pre-PED (steroids, et al) era in the NFL--say, 1940 through 1970--and then compare it to what we've been seeing lately, especially in players whose careers began after the merger (1970-onward). It seems to me that we're seeing a lot more of these types of stories in the last 20 years or so...since PEDs have been more commonplace.

    I'm not sure for how long steroids have been common in the game but most armchair football historians trace it back to the mid/late 70s, and to those Steelers teams in particular (not saying they were the most guilty, because I'm sure it was more common back then than previously thought--it just happens to be the "conventional wisdom" that Pittsburgh was using them more often/more commonly/more effectively, etc.).

    PEDs not only can have psychological effects (i.e. steroids = 'roid rage, etc.), but take a look at the SIZE of these athletes today. I mean, Mike Webster was a HOF center playing at around 250 for most of his career; Jack Lambert came into the NFL and had an immediate impact as a 220 lb. middle linebacker.

    Today, MLBs have to be around 245-250 to even get a look-see by scouts, and almost all OLs have to be in the 300-range.

    The size/speed quotient is off the charts now, with 6-4, 280 pound giants registering 4.6 times in the 40-yard dash.

    Increased size while keeping sprinter-type speed leads to more violent collisions, and more head injuries.

    Let's face it, the NFL tests for HGH and steroids but there's no way they can catch everyone--in fact, they probably can't even catch 10% of the users since they'll always find a way to cheat on the exam, so to speak. Besides, these guys don't just get big in the NFL; to be a top-notch player at a top-notch NCAA program, you need to have the size/speed as well. You can get away with being a little smaller at the college level, but not by too much. There's no question PED use still goes on at the major programs, and that the strength and conditioning coaches there also know how to cheat on the NCAAs drug tests.

    Would be an interesting study, for sure.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dapats1281. Show dapats1281's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    Don't think the rookie symposium is enough.

    I think players should be REQUIRED to attend more workshops/symposiums/lectures throughout their careers. Fact of the matter is, most players aren't prepared for the fame and stardom. And it seems like most players aren't prepared for retirement either.

    The players definitely won't like this, but a lot of them just don't seem to get it.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MoreRings. Show MoreRings's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : So what you do? Take the money, fame/limelight if you knew there was going to be a high probability you would be physically and emotionally traumatized, depressed, drug addicted and unable to fit back into society after your career ended?
    Posted by NYC[/QUOTE]

    I would.  Seems some of these guys get out early (B.Sanders) before
    the body gets to beat up.

    Sure the NFL lifestyle is tough on a lot of players, but doesnt some of the
    problems they run into fall back on the individual?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]It would be interesting to study how many "football-related" deaths, suicides, etc., occurred during the pre-PED (steroids, et al) era in the NFL--say, 1940 through 1970--and then compare it to what we've been seeing lately, especially in players whose careers began after the merger (1970-onward). It seems to me that we're seeing a lot more of these types of stories in the last 20 years or so...since PEDs have been more commonplace. I'm not sure for how long steroids have been common in the game but most armchair football historians trace it back to the mid/late 70s, and to those Steelers teams in particular (not saying they were the most guilty, because I'm sure it was more common back then than previously thought--it just happens to be the "conventional wisdom" that Pittsburgh was using them more often/more commonly/more effectively, etc.). PEDs not only can have psychological effects (i.e. steroids = 'roid rage, etc.), but take a look at the SIZE of these athletes today. I mean, Mike Webster was a HOF center playing at around 250 for most of his career; Jack Lambert came into the NFL and had an immediate impact as a 220 lb. middle linebacker. Today, MLBs have to be around 245-250 to even get a look-see by scouts, and almost all OLs have to be in the 300-range. The size/speed quotient is off the charts now, with 6-4, 280 pound giants registering 4.6 times in the 40-yard dash. Increased size while keeping sprinter-type speed leads to more violent collisions, and more head injuries. Let's face it, the NFL tests for HGH and steroids but there's no way they can catch everyone--in fact, they probably can't even catch 10% of the users since they'll always find a way to cheat on the exam, so to speak. Besides, these guys don't just get big in the NFL; to be a top-notch player at a top-notch NCAA program, you need to have the size/speed as well. You can get away with being a little smaller at the college level, but not by too much. There's no question PED use still goes on at the major programs, and that the strength and conditioning coaches there also know how to cheat on the NCAAs drug tests. Would be an interesting study, for sure.
    Posted by hardright[/QUOTE]

    Steroids are just an indication of everyone seeking their 15 minutes of fame no matter what the consequences are. People are more desperate to achieve as the economy goes down, national prestige goes down, class  division increases, and altruism descends. It's all related.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : I would.  Seems some of these guys get out early (B.Sanders) before the body gets to beat up. Sure the NFL lifestyle is tough on a lot of players, but doesnt some of the problems they run into fall back on the individual?
    Posted by MoreRings[/QUOTE]

    It might seem it is up to the individual but it is happening too much to be considered an isolated, individual phenomena. One might think you can have the money and fame without the downside of physical pain/emotional depression and drugs to combat the both but all the concussions, depressions and deaths prove that it is not.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from rameakap. Show rameakap's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : So what would you do? Take the money, fame/limelight if you knew there was going to be a high probability you would be physically and emotionally traumatized, depressed, drug addicted and unable to fit back into society after your career ended?
    Posted by NYC[/QUOTE]

    You could play the game like Laura Maroney

    dance at the line of scrimmage for 4 years, pocket 6 million, never get a concussion or serious injury, not fulfill your talent cuz the sport is so dangerous, then leave the league at age 26 to enter another profession
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : You could play the game like Laura Maroney dance at the line of scrimmage for 4 years, pocket 6 million, never get a concussion or serious injury, not fulfill your talent cuz the sport is so dangerous, then leave the league at age 26 to enter another profession
    Posted by rameakap[/QUOTE]

    The issue of the effect of the game on player health is much bigger than the career of any one player.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from shenanigan. Show shenanigan's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    Thousands of people have been in the NFL. Unless somebody can show me some evidence that these guys have a higher rate of suicide or drug addiction over a normal group I'm just not buying it. I know plenty of people with these same issues who never played football. Sometimes life just sucks....sometimes you have nobody to blame but yourself.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Thousands of people have been in the NFL. Unless somebody can show me some evidence that these guys have a higher rate of suicide or drug addiction over a normal group I'm just not buying it. I know plenty of people with these same issues who never played football. Sometimes life just sucks....sometimes you have nobody to blame but yourself.
    Posted by shenanigan[/QUOTE]

    Shenanigan

    Yes, there should be studies. The question is why NFL management has not conducted them? We know the answer to that: they are afraid of the truth.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from seattlepat70. Show seattlepat70's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Don't think the rookie symposium is enough. I think players should be REQUIRED to attend more workshops/symposiums/lectures throughout their careers. Fact of the matter is, most players aren't prepared for the fame and stardom. And it seems like most players aren't prepared for retirement either. The players definitely won't like this, but a lot of them just don't seem to get it.
    Posted by dapats1281[/QUOTE]

    the irony is that on the outside seau seemed like he was mentally prepared for it all, more than anyone else.


     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : the irony is that on the outside seau seemed like he was mentally prepared for it all, more than anyone else.
    Posted by seattlepat70[/QUOTE]

    The scary part is Seau was a "role model", a guy to look up to. BB and the team looked up to him for 4 seasons when any sensible person would have retired. We all thought he was great for sticking around. Kraft broke out into tears yesterday as he was talking about him. Seau was the last person we expected this from. We were all wrong! This is a tragedy and we need to look at ourselves. The league needs to look at itself.   

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from TSWFAN. Show TSWFAN's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    His reason for living was playing in the NFL. When he could not , he had no reason to live. Understandable.  Just an opinion.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from TwentyRowKid. Show TwentyRowKid's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Money, status, fame and the rush of intense physical competition in the moment have replaced common sense and a healthy physical and emotional well being. All this supported by a league and owners who profit from it and fans like us who live vicariously from it. We're all guilty. 
    Posted by NYC[/QUOTE]
    Just like every other corporate business. Money and profit come first, the safety of the workers somewhere later. That's why the workers have unions to help protect them.  This battle has be played out since the beginning of time.  Nothing new here.


     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]His reason for living was playing in the NFL. When he could not , he had no reason to live. Understandable.  Just an opinion.
    Posted by TSWFAN[/QUOTE]

    I do not think it is as simple as "NO NFL, no reason to live". 

    Was the NFL itself the killer: the hits, the concussions, the drugs, the brain damage, the steroids/HGH, being unprepared for a normal life w/o glory, being objectified as a hero and losing  that role? Or some cocktail of all these things?

    Seau will live on, but not just as the hero we thought of him. He will also be the memory of what is wrong with the NFL, the tragedy that lurks inside of the most exciting sport on earth. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: National Tragedy League : Just like every other corporate business. Money and profit come first, the safety of the workers somewhere later. That's why the workers have unions to help protect them.  This battle has be played out since the beginning of time.  Nothing new here.
    Posted by TwentyRowKid[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, in the end the players are just workers, the coaches are managers trying to get peak performance out of them so they can keep their jobs as well. 

    The owners? Well, they are the owners. They don't take the hits, they don't need the steroids, they don't committ suicide; they have the intoxication of money and power.  
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Thousands of people have been in the NFL. Unless somebody can show me some evidence that these guys have a higher rate of suicide or drug addiction over a normal group I'm just not buying it. I know plenty of people with these same issues who never played football. Sometimes life just sucks....sometimes you have nobody to blame but yourself.
    Posted by shenanigan[/QUOTE]

    There are studies.  Oddly, the one quoted below was widely publicized in Canada (where the CFL reviewed it), but doesn't seem to have been publicized much in the US.  Don't want to get into conspiracy theories but I do think it's odd that this American study wasn't reported (as far as I can tell) very much in America!
    ________________________________

    A University of North Carolina study is painting a sobering portrait of head trauma and the long-term affects on professional football players who take thousands of hits to the head over their careers.

    In what may be the most stunning revelation contained in the study, doctors determined that the life expectancy for all pro football players, from quarterbacks to kickers, is 55 years, while some insurance providers say it is 51 years.


    Conducted by the Matthew A. Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center at UNC, the study found that repeatedly concussed NFL players have five times the rate of mild cognitive impairment than the average person, while retired NFLers suffer from Alzheimer's disease at a 37 per cent higher rate.


    In addition to concussions and permanent brain damage, researchers also pinpointed other concerns, including memory loss, blurred vision and reduced blood flow due to repeated blows to the head and body.


    The groundbreaking findings have caught the attention of the CFL and its players, who discussed the study at last week's CFL Players' Association meeting, according to a Globe and Mail report.


    The CFLPA board is interested in adopting the NFL's approach to curbing dangerous hits, which includes stiffer fines and suspensions.

    At least one player, Winnipeg Blue Bombers defensive lineman Doug Brown, hopes progress is made to protect pro football players of the future.

    "The culture of pro sports is there's a lot of denial. It's a young person's game and it's hard to see the light at the end of your career. It's like a rock star mentality," Brown told the Globe and Mail. "You work six months a year and play a game for a living. Unfortunately with us, it balances out. There's a payment to be made at the end of your career.



     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    Seeking a career in a violent sport clearly has its undesirable aspects.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    In Response to Re: National Tragedy League:
    [QUOTE]Seeking a career in a violent sport clearly has its undesirable aspects.
    Posted by BabeParilli[/QUOTE]

    At the start of one's career in the NFL there is power and glory. The world is yours. At the end of one's career you are usually unwanted, you want to stay but they don't need you anymore. You are still a young man, but all has changed and you don't fit anymore. You are no longer special. Then, soon after the headaches and depression starts and lasts .......You ending up paying the bill triple fold for the glory you got in the early days.

    Would you make that kind of deal with the devil? I don't have the talent but even if I did I wouldn't take it. 

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from digger0862. Show digger0862's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    There are many careers that are as dangerous or more than pro football. You would hope that everything is being done to minimize the dangers in these professions but more can be done still. The NFL is behind the 8-ball but is at least starting to open their eyes to making the game a little bit safer for the players.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: National Tragedy League

    emotional trauma along with serious prescription drug use/abuse/addiction. And players have an extremely difficult time adjusting to society afterward.


    Sounds like your in a rock band.
     

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