Rodney Harrison says "He's scared for the future"

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    Rodney Harrison says "He's scared for the future"

    Here's the article and there's a video if you follow the link.From yahoo.com:

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/rodney-harrison-says-scared-death-career-filled-concussions-015416631--nfl.html

     

    After suffering an estimated 20 concussions over his 15-year pro career, Rodney Harrison now says he's "scared to death" about the future of his health in upcoming years.

    In an emotional interview on the upcoming Costas Tonight Super Bowl special, the former all-pro safety for the San Diego Chargers and New England Patriots says he now experiences symptoms of loneliness, isolation and anxiety. Harrison believes the NFL did not do enough to educate players about brain trauma during his career and says that he never even heard the word "concussion" mentioned by teams for his first five or six seasons in the league.

    Harrison was known for a hard-hitting style that earned him over $200,000 in fines over his career and often earned him the label of a "dirty" player. But with his career now over, the 40-year-old father of four is speaking out with more attention being paid attention to the brain trauma issue after the recent suicides of former players Dave Duerson and Junior Seau.

    "A lot of these players are really really suffering, Bob," Harrison said to Costas. "And this stuff is for real because I'm experiencing it now. I'm scared to death. I have four kids, I have a beautiful wife and I'm scared to death what might happen to me 10 or 15 years from now."

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    On top of the concussions these players suffer from depression for a variety of things. One day they are making millions adored by fans, treated like gold, fly all over the country, experience friendships with your teammates and coaches...the next they are shut out of that NFL fraternity, where they get to watch friends and coaches go on to enjoy success and continue to be adored while making millions. Some of these guys only have a boat load of debt and lingering life long injuries to hold onto when they are told they aren't good enough to be on the team anymore. I can see why it's a big problem when you add in post concussion syndrome.

     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from seattlepat70. Show seattlepat70's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    They should also sue the HSs and Universities they played for. Why just the NFL? 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from PATSthebest. Show PATSthebest's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    There is a difference between players from 20 or 30 years ago and today. Todays players are much bigger, stronger, and faster. Brains, heads and skulls are still the same size. I would not be surprised if more players have issues. However, it is also not past the relm of possiblity that some players starve from the mentioned fame and fortune.

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    This is the life they chose. 

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to RockScully's comment:

     

    There is no proof having sustained concussions drives former players to automatic depression and suicide.

     



    Right junior. Multiple concussions are good for you. Learn the game.

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    And many fans whine when they try to install a few rules to protect the players. Duh.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    "I am not making light of this,"

    Umm, yes you are. Your entire posts lacks empathy and understanding. 

    "Can't the depression or suicidal thoughts be due to the fact you aren't in control, aren't making millions anymore and maybe are struggling financially?"

    Yes, and drugs can add to it as well. But post-concussions symptoms are very real and can be debilitating.

    "Why is it that it's about multiple concussions these guys shook off as players and are now looking to almost grasp for excuses as to why they're depressed?"

    The guy is saying he's worried for his future because some of the older guys really struggle to function mentally. 

    "I would suggest having a post career plan"

    Yeah. And try enacting that plan when you are mentally unable to function effectively in a day to day manner. Your ignorance on this topic is shameful. You simply have no idea what it's like to live with such injuries as you get older. I hope for your sake you never have to learn. 

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    "This is the life they chose."

    Wrong, completely wrong. As recently as five years ago NFL-sanctioned doctors were telling players that concussions had no lasting symptoms. The didn't know the full implications of what they were choosing. Not at all. 

    Living with a bum hip and being mentally incapacitated to a large degree are two very different things. 

    Where I would agree with you is that going forward, the NFL needs to have players sign waivers that specifically spell out and acknowledge the risks. From that point forward, it's on the players who sign those waiver to be aware now that science has to a good extent at least filled out the potential for risk (though much research work remains). At that point, it will be the life you chose. But for now, it's not unlike families who grew up around nuclear power plants before certain risks were not understood and precautions to protect groundwater were not taken....

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    It's a serious issue in both football and hockey . . . I'd be scared too if I were Rodney.  The brain damage is real--and the debilitating effects of that brain damage really can't be dismissed as merely depression from a life change.  It's far more serious than that.  It's good that players, the leagues, and the public are all becoming more aware of the effects of repeated brain injury in sports.  Hopefully, it means something will be done about it . . .

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    I really want to feel bad for them but then I take a look at Reed's, Harrison's (both), Pollard's, and a host of others careers and realize they are doing this to themselves in the end. You don't need to lead with your head and you don't need to target other players heads. Yes concussions are going to happen, it's part of a game they get paid millions to play, but if the players policed themselves you could element a whole section of it out. If they players were really concerned about it then they and their union have to be more proactive policing themselves first and preventing as many unnessecary concussions as possible. But, while the union and players fight suspensions and high fines for head hunting they have no soap box to cry on

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to PatsEng's comment:

    I really want to feel bad for them but then I take a look at Reed's, Harrison's (both), Pollard's, and a host of others careers and realize they are doing this to themselves in the end. You don't need to lead with your head and you don't need to target other players heads. Yes concussions are going to happen, it's part of a game they get paid millions to play, but if the players policed themselves you could element a whole section of it out. If they players were really concerned about it then they and their union have to be more proactive policing themselves first and preventing as many unnessecary concussions as possible. But, while the union and players fight suspensions and high fines for head hunting they have no soap box to cry on



    So, in other words, you don't really want to feel bad for them. 

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    Babe,

    As usual, the fecal droppings keep popping from the wise one's oral orafice (the queen of queens). My ex girlfriend was best friend's with former RB Kevin Turner who presently has ALS. At his wedding, he was symbolic of a true athletic specimen. Knowing about is condition, I self informed myself with concussions and related symptoms. While teaching, I used to make the comparison of the brain inside the cranium like an egg inside its shell. Even a minor blow not directed solely at the head can result in the brain shifting and literally slamming against the skull. This contusion or else known as a concussion can have short to long term results depending on the severity of the blow impacted. Traumatic concussions can result in reduction of physical or cognitive ability, debiletated brain function, sleeping disorders, anxiety, recurring headaches, amnesia, Dementia, Parkinson's Disease, anger, frustration and even suicide to name a few. Kevin is now a shell of his NFL days and it's sad to see anyone have to go through this slow and debiletating process. God bless KT.

    True these players signed up to play this physically violent game, but were either non informed or the information wasn't available at the time. The speed of the game has changed dramatically judging from the size, strength and speed of present day players. Levying much heavier fines, suspending or even terminating repeat offenders may be a way to curb the 'head to head' hits. My 2 sense.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from CaptainZdeno33. Show CaptainZdeno33's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    Seriously, Rusty? No offense but that is the worst assessment of a topic you have posted here. Read this and tell me that he is just using it as an excuse.

    http://www.boston.com/sports/football/patriots/articles/2007/02/02/i_dont_want_anyone_to_end_up_like_me/

     
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    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to RockScully's comment:

    To the other immature and obnoxious people on this thread who chose to ignore my comments about not making light out of it, just go about your business. Apparently, you don't feature the best reading comprehension skills.

     

    Babe and his mental hospital minion troll "Geaaux Tigres" chiming in with it is par for the course, but some others I am surprised at.

     




    Why the surprise junior? You are clearly the one person here calling themselves a Pats' fan who comes closest to being universally loathed.

     

     
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  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to PatsEng's comment:

     

    I really want to feel bad for them but then I take a look at Reed's, Harrison's (both), Pollard's, and a host of others careers and realize they are doing this to themselves in the end. You don't need to lead with your head and you don't need to target other players heads. Yes concussions are going to happen, it's part of a game they get paid millions to play, but if the players policed themselves you could element a whole section of it out. If they players were really concerned about it then they and their union have to be more proactive policing themselves first and preventing as many unnessecary concussions as possible. But, while the union and players fight suspensions and high fines for head hunting they have no soap box to cry on

     



    So, in other words, you don't really want to feel bad for them. 

     




    the opposite actually. I want to feel bad for them but I can't as opposed to not wanting to feel bad for them and do

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from CaptainZdeno33. Show CaptainZdeno33's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to RockScully's comment:

    To the other immature and obnoxious people on this thread who chose to ignore my comments about not making light out of it, just go about your business. Apparently, you don't feature the best reading comprehension skills.

     

    Babe and his mental hospital minion troll "Geaaux Tigres" chiming in with it is par for the course, but some others I am surprised at.

     



    Until you take your own advice there is no f'n chance in he11 people will do the same with you. My opinion has been called stupid and wrong by you several times. Man, you're awfully sensitive.

    There is clearly a correlation between brain trauma and depression, anxiety, pain killer addiction, etc later in life that some of these players go through (or anyone who has suffered a major head injury). You can't just say oh these players knew what they were getting into. How do you know they aren't being brainwashed into playing by coaches or trainers that didn't know anything about the matter?

    I didn't, nor will I comment on the issue of former players suing the NFL, but to downplay the significance that multiple concussions has on someone's future is just ignorant.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from portfolio1. Show portfolio1's posts

    Re: Rodney Harrison says

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    On top of the concussions these players suffer from depression for a variety of things. One day they are making millions adored by fans, treated like gold, fly all over the country, experience friendships with your teammates and coaches...the next they are shut out of that NFL fraternity, where they get to watch friends and coaches go on to enjoy success and continue to be adored while making millions. Some of these guys only have a boat load of debt and lingering life long injuries to hold onto when they are told they aren't good enough to be on the team anymore. I can see why it's a big problem when you add in post concussion syndrome.



    While you are right the issues you raise pale in comparison. What these guys face we can all empathize with because illness does not require you to be famous or talented. Imagine yourself being told by a doctor that a test he had you take came back and said there was a 67% chance you will get a horrible and deadly disease in the next 10-15 years and there was no current way to cure it or prevent it. How would you feel? How would it affect your outlook on your life?

    I do also agree that the financial thing can be a huge deal. If they do not at least protect enough of their earnings to last them through their lives they can be left both destitute and without any career to fall back on.

     

     
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