Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from clouts. Show clouts's posts

    Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    By taking the ball out of Tom's hands (or at least letting him share it a bit more) the Patriots are now able to position themselves to win.  Brady's best individual years always result in disapointing ends:

    2007  RAT=117.2  (#1)

    2010 RAT=111.0 (#2)

    2011 RAT=105.6 (#3)

    In fact, you could argue his worst years were the Patriots' most successful:

    2001 RAT=86.5 (3rd worst)

    2003 RAT=85.9 (worst)

    2004 RAT= (92.6 middle of the pack)

     

    This year, he has a 87.3 rating, on the lower end and below his career average of 95.7.

     

    Basically, whether by design or by necessity, throwing the entire organization on his back took them away from being what he is best at:  being a Game Manager.  The running stats seem to support this as well.

     

    That's not a knock on Brady.  It just means he's like many other QBs, and makes you wonder if players like Manning, Marino, etc. had to not win the game every time out vs. manage it, where their success would lie.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sam-Adams. Show Sam-Adams's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    Good stuff clouts.....

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    Thanks for posting, thought it was common knowledge though. When a D has to worry about a running game and passing game is makes both more effective. When a D only has to worry about one or the other they can usually limit it pretty well. So, the conclusion really is, just as long as you have an average or better running game you QB will benefit from it.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    Cool

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from themightypatriots. Show themightypatriots's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    The Chargers ran the ball in vain for 3 quarters before finally scoring at will by passing.  Hopefully the Pats don't make the same mistake.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy


    Amen.....

     

    Championship teams know who they are and how they want to win. They forge an identity and know where to turn when big plays need to be made. On Saturday night in Foxboro, the Patriots formally announced their new identity, and it's one we haven't seen in a while: They are a physical football team.

     

    LeGarrette Blount and the Patriots turned away the Colts with a run-oriented offense that came about by necessity. (AP)

    LeGarrette Blount and the Patriots turned away the Colts with a run-oriented offense that came about by necessity. (AP)

    Forget about the multifaceted tight end explosions. Forget about the deep ball. Forget about using the short passing game to set up the run. Forget about the dizzying array of screens and pick passes. They still have all those options in their back pocket. They do, after all, employ one of the top passers in NFL history. But this team plays best when it eschews the high-flying attack for a simple, old-school style.

     

    You saw hints of the development in the first game of the preseason. Remember the very first drive of the preseason? The Pats ran it six straight times for 80 yards and a Stevan Ridley touchdown. They blew Philadelphia off the ball. It was a dominant performance, and you could see how excited the players were. You could hear it when you talked to them the next week. They were building the early foundation as a running team.

    Of course, identity changes don't happen overnight.

    They needed nearly every one of 52 passes to beat Buffalo in Week 1 of the regular season, and there were comebacks along the way that your average plodder simply could not win. And when Rob Gronkowski's cameo temporarily gave Brady his most dynamic weapon, they obviously were tempted to open up things. But, in a strange way, the Gronkowski injury may have helped this team find itself.

    Are the Patriots a better team with Gronkowski? Probably. He's one of the top players in the NFL and the best receiver on their team. He's a force on third downs and an otherworldly option in the red area (as Bill Belichick would say). There is no better combination run blocker/pass receiver in the league.

    But he is also a temptation. He gives a pass-happy offensive coordinator with a Hall of Fame quarterback an excuse to throw the ball more often than necessary. And while I'd prefer that the Pats have that option available to them, especially if they get into a shootout, they have had their most convincing victories when they force-feed the running game right from the opening snap.

    I know what you're thinking: Why would you willingly take the ball away from Tom Brady and entrust a known fumbler and an undrafted running back who was cast aside by Tampa to move the ball? Good question. But I think there are a few answers.

    First, it isn't about LeGarrette Blount or Stevan Ridley nor is it about Shane Vereen or even Brandon Bolden. It's about the five horses in front of them. With Gronkowski absent, Logan Mankins is the best player on this offense not named Brady. Quite frankly, his four counterparts probably all rank in the top six. I believe in most cases the offensive line and other blockers are responsible for 70 percent of the running game, the system for another 10 percent and the running back for maybe 20 percent. This group is effective.

    Second, I think Brady is at his best when he has a strong running game. Like all quarterbacks, he throws better against fewer defensive backs, and that running game forces teams to commit numbers in the box. Furthermore, the real threat of a handoff allows him to use play action as more than a meaningless gesture. One of the things that makes Brady great is his ball handling skill -- that element is lost when teams know he is passing nearly every down. He also is so adept at converting third downs with manageable distances. Which quarterback in the league would you prefer to Brady on third-and-3?

    A strong commitment to the running game also wears down a defense. It's exhausting to shed blocks. This weekend saw plenty of evidence to prove the old adage that if you keep running it, eventually you'll pop a long run. Blount rumbled for a 73-yard touchdown. Marshawn Lynch had a 31-yard score to seal Seattle's win. Frank Gore's 39-yard run set up the final score for San Francisco. All three runs came in the fourth quarter. All three teams ran the ball more than they threw it. All three runs essentially iced the game. You see where I'm going here?

    There are plenty of reasons to commit to the run, even with Tom Brady on your team. And yes, the recent inclement weather has added an important one. But the great thing about this assumed identity is that if it goes awry, the Pats aren't bound to it. You saw San Diego attempt to impose its will on Denver on Sunday. When that failed, the Chargers eventually turned to the passing game, but it was too little and too late. But the Patriots not only have experience this year with the late comeback, they have Tom Brady ready to lead one.

    The 2013 Patriots may not win the Super Bowl. Heck, they might not even beat Denver. They have, after all, been hit as hard by the injury bug as any contending team I can remember, and they went through a significant change in personnel before the season even began. But as they have conquered their challenges, they have developed their own personality. They are a young defense, a deep roster and a team that has dealt with adversity. But they are a physical offense. A team that can punish you on the ground. And that identity should serve them well.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from patsbandwagonsince76. Show patsbandwagonsince76's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    It is harder for a QB it is harder to throw the occassional pass to make a 3rd down than pass almost every down. Thats why I was impressed with TB last game.

    Notices last game TB was tossing the ball during a timeout.

    He has got to appreciate how much lass pressure he gets in the pocket when the pass rus has to hols up just a bit to guard against the run possibility.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy


    Commitment has been the key for this power, smash mouth, old school offense.

    Another myth that has been blown to high hell, is that run heavy teams = less scoring. In actuality we have scored 39 ppg the last 3 games where we have ran more then passed. Some would say it is only because we have HOFer LeGarrette Blount, but it is more about the commitment to staying with a run heavy offense.

     

    [+] EnlargeLeGarrette Blount, LaRon Landry Al Bello/Getty ImagesHow often will the Patriots rely on LeGarrette Blount to carry the ball against the Broncos?

     

    2. Should the Patriots stick with a run-heavy offense? The scariest thing about the Patriots' success in their 43-22 win over the Colts -- when they had 46 rushing attempts and 234 yards and only 27 passes -- wasn't just the numbers they generated. It was their willingness to change things up at a time of the year that normally belongs to Brady.

    For most of the past few seasons, head coach Bill Belichick has asked Brady to carry his offense with a prolific air attack. Against Indianapolis, Belichick reverted to a strategy that hadn't been seen in New England since Corey Dillonwas toting the rock. LeGarrette Blountwas the star (with 166 rushing yards and four touchdowns) but there was also genius in the play calling of offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels. It certainly helped that the Patriots were facing an opponent that ranked 26th in the NFL in rush defense, but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. That balance -- as well as the Patriots' holding the ball for 35 minutes -- was effective in a game that turned into a blowout. It will be even more vital this coming Sunday.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    Way to analyze with blinders on.

     

    I'll let you guess what the category below is, in which the Pats rated much higher than they did in the latter years you cite.

     

    2001 - #6

    2003 - #1

    2004 - #2

     

    This "magic bullet" theory that running equals winning is simply stupid. There are a lot of factors that go into winning it all.

     

    FAR more significant than simply running is having a runner that is feared. Blount might just be that guy at this point.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from patsbandwagonsince76. Show patsbandwagonsince76's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    Commitment has been the key for this power, smash mouth, old school offense.

    Another myth that has been blown to high hell, is that run heavy teams = less scoring. In actuality we have scored 39 ppg the last 3 games where we have ran more then passed. Some would say it is only because we have HOFer LeGarrette Blount, but it is more about the commitment to staying with a run heavy offense.

     

    [+] EnlargeLeGarrette Blount, LaRon Landry Al Bello/Getty ImagesHow often will the Patriots rely on LeGarrette Blount to carry the ball against the Broncos?

     

    2. Should the Patriots stick with a run-heavy offense? The scariest thing about the Patriots' success in their 43-22 win over the Colts -- when they had 46 rushing attempts and 234 yards and only 27 passes -- wasn't just the numbers they generated. It was their willingness to change things up at a time of the year that normally belongs to Brady.

    For most of the past few seasons, head coach Bill Belichick has asked Brady to carry his offense with a prolific air attack. Against Indianapolis, Belichick reverted to a strategy that hadn't been seen in New England since Corey Dillonwas toting the rock. LeGarrette Blountwas the star (with 166 rushing yards and four touchdowns) but there was also genius in the play calling of offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels. It certainly helped that the Patriots were facing an opponent that ranked 26th in the NFL in rush defense, but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. That balance -- as well as the Patriots' holding the ball for 35 minutes -- was effective in a game that turned into a blowout. It will be even more vital this coming Sunday.

    [/QUOTE]

    Hope he does stick with it and not panic if the game is close.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. 

    [/QUOTE]

    You're going to do that when the opponent is noted as a poor run defender.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Way to analyze with blinders on.

     

    I'll let you guess what the category below is, in which the Pats rated much higher than they did in the latter years you cite.

     

    2001 - #6

    2003 - #1

    2004 - #2

     

    This "magic bullet" theory that running equals winning is simply stupid. There are a lot of factors that go into winning it all.

     

    FAR more significant than simply running is having a runner that is feared. Blount might just be that guy at this point.

    [/QUOTE]

    don't spoil it for the bonner crew, babe.  They have been rubbing swords for 2 days now and chest thumping like they somehow knew something BB didn't.  It's freaking hysterical.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from seawolfxs. Show seawolfxs's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    I can never say that I dont want Gronk right now - never. The best red zone receiver PERIOD

    I think BB saw what he had and changed the team philosophy. We heard it all before the game but no was listening. Also Mankins is now: still a great road grader and with his ankle less a great pass protector. Thye have great run blocking schemes and are excellent technically - thanks Scarneca

    And i dont think the other teams no what to make of it, and thye still must be afraid of TV passing

    i know the media doesnt understand, and the simpleton analysts will quote season stats that are now meaningless

     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from agcsbill. Show agcsbill's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to clouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    By taking the ball out of Tom's hands (or at least letting him share it a bit more) the Patriots are now able to position themselves to win.  Brady's best individual years always result in disapointing ends:

    2007  RAT=117.2  (#1)

    2010 RAT=111.0 (#2)

    2011 RAT=105.6 (#3)

    In fact, you could argue his worst years were the Patriots' most successful:

    2001 RAT=86.5 (3rd worst)

    2003 RAT=85.9 (worst)

    2004 RAT= (92.6 middle of the pack)

     This year, he has a 87.3 rating, on the lower end and below his career average of 95.7.

     Basically, whether by design or by necessity, throwing the entire organization on his back took them away from being what he is best at:  being a Game Manager.  The running stats seem to support this as well.

     That's not a knock on Brady.  It just means he's like many other QBs, and makes you wonder if players like Manning, Marino, etc. had to not win the game every time out vs. manage it, where their success would lie.

    [/QUOTE]

    Clouts, good stuff and I can see your points.

    But, and a BIG but, if Brady, in the last two SBs, completely failed to give the Pats a chance to win, he can be criticized for underperforming.  In both games, in spite of stellar defensive play on the part of the NY Giants, who many have said they played their best games of the entire year in those two SB wins,  Brady and the O did put the team ahead late in each game.  Unfortunately in both games, Brady could only watch the D give up long, game winning drives in the last minutes of each game by the Giants.  What would one want Brady to do at that point?  Do you go back to him and say:  "Thanks for getting the team into the lead late in the game to win, but you should have had the team ahead earlier and by more points so the D wouldn't have the pressure to stop the Giants."?  It is a team game and we all were shouting with joy when the Pats got into those leads only to see the leads crumble as a result of crappy D play.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from GO47. Show GO47's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. 



    You're going to do that when the opponent is noted as a poor run defender.

    [/QUOTE]


    Besides the Patriots the other 3 teams left are all good at run defense taken from ESPN:

    RK   TEAM             ATT   YDS    YDS/A    LONG  TD     YDS/G

    4  San Francisco  397   1535    3.9        30      11      95.9

    7  Denver            420   1626    3.9        35      15      101.6

    7  Seattle            422   1626    3.9        51        4      101.6

     

    As mentioned a lot of this has to do with who is in on your schedule. But Denver will be the 1st real test for this new Patriot running game. As stated good physical offensive lines can soften the front 7 making it easier to run during the 3rd and 4th quarters. Question is will the Patriots be behind then or ahead? It will be interesting to see just what the game plan is.

     

    Although having one of their DBs, Harris, put on IR with an torn ACL makes the passing game an attractive option. So we may see more passing from the Patriots for this game. But I would still make them respect the run first.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to agcsbill's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to clouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    By taking the ball out of Tom's hands (or at least letting him share it a bit more) the Patriots are now able to position themselves to win.  Brady's best individual years always result in disapointing ends:

    2007  RAT=117.2  (#1)

    2010 RAT=111.0 (#2)

    2011 RAT=105.6 (#3)

    In fact, you could argue his worst years were the Patriots' most successful:

    2001 RAT=86.5 (3rd worst)

    2003 RAT=85.9 (worst)

    2004 RAT= (92.6 middle of the pack)

     This year, he has a 87.3 rating, on the lower end and below his career average of 95.7.

     Basically, whether by design or by necessity, throwing the entire organization on his back took them away from being what he is best at:  being a Game Manager.  The running stats seem to support this as well.

     That's not a knock on Brady.  It just means he's like many other QBs, and makes you wonder if players like Manning, Marino, etc. had to not win the game every time out vs. manage it, where their success would lie.

    [/QUOTE]

    Clouts, good stuff and I can see your points.

    But, and a BIG but, if Brady, in the last two SBs, completely failed to give the Pats a chance to win, he can be criticized for underperforming.  In both games, in spite of stellar defensive play on the part of the NY Giants, who many have said they played their best games of the entire year in those two SB wins,  Brady and the O did put the team ahead late in each game.  Unfortunately in both games, Brady could only watch the D give up long, game winning drives in the last minutes of each game by the Giants.  What would one want Brady to do at that point?  Do you go back to him and say:  "Thanks for getting the team into the lead late in the game to win, but you should have had the team ahead earlier and by more points so the D wouldn't have the pressure to stop the Giants."?  It is a team game and we all were shouting with joy when the Pats got into those leads only to see the leads crumble as a result of crappy D play.

    [/QUOTE]

    No doubt bill. the offense ddnt play well but when the game was on the line Brady put the team on his back and lead them to a late scoring drive that could have been the game winner! lets hope we dont put the whole thing on his shoulders again, and utilize a dominate rushing attack lead my mankins and his bearded brothers!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    You know that saying "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade"?

    Well, for many years Brady has been asked to do just that.   He was so good in his early years (with a stout, veteran defense) that he was asked to do more and more with less and less.

    It's 2014 and people are trying to rewrite history.

    The running game for the past 5 years was sub-par.  Sammy Morris, Fred Boom-Boom Taylor, L. Maroney (post-injury), BJGE.    They had neither a power back nor a breakaway threat.

    Fast forward to the last 3 weeks (a very small sample size) and the run game has been very effective.   I hope it continues.   I really do.  But if the run game stalls the rest of the way a segment of this board will blame Tom Brady.

    It's ridiculous.   But that's what will happen.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ANONMD08. Show ANONMD08's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to GO47's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. 

    [/QUOTE]

    You're going to do that when the opponent is noted as a poor run defender.

    [/QUOTE]


    Besides the Patriots the other 3 teams left are all good at run defense taken from ESPN:

    RK   TEAM             ATT   YDS    YDS/A    LONG  TD     YDS/G

    4

    SanFrancisco

    397  1535   3.9     30      11      95.9 7 Denver          420   1626  3.9      35     15      101.6 7  Seattle        422   1626  3.9      51       4      101.6

     

    As mentioned a lot of this has to do with who is in on your schedule. But Denver will be the 1st real test for this new Patriot running game. As stated good physical offensive lines can soften the front 7 making it easier to run during the 3rd and 4th quarters. Question is will the Patriots be behind then or ahead? It will be interesting to see just what the game plan is.

     

    Although having one of their DBs, Harris, put on IR with an torn ACL makes the passing game an attractive option. So we may see more passing from the Patriots for this game. But I would still make them respect the run first.

    [/QUOTE]


    Denver still has Rogers-Cromartie. It does take away the one side for Denver having to play Quinton Jammer.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    Running well=good

    running poorly=you are going to lose

    Belichick is on the radio right now saying, "I don't think anyone wants to run it when you're only getting 1 or 2 yards...you might as well quarterback sneak if you're going to be doing that".

    I think we are running now because we are a three tightend offense with ZERO tightends. We have two slot receivers and not much of anything else to throw to.

    I also think we are running it because Blount and Ridley are proving to be pretty good runners. I'm all for running it because personally I like watching a good running game and because I don't think we can move the ball any other way right now. Honestly the best offense is a balanced one...hopefully we can be that.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from clouts. Show clouts's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy


    BB got wood in starting in 2006 and decided to go with his high-powered offense, and changed what made him successful:  ball control and a solid defense.  He put all his eggs in Brady's basket, and the results speak for themselves:  by trying to be an pass-first team, Brady's success is akin to Marino's....

     

    Overall, Brady's playoff stats are good, very good at times, but not 'out of this world' good.  He's not in the GOAT category with no running game and no defense.  He certainly doesn't separate himself from the pack like many seem he does.  I've said this for years, and in the end...this shouldn't matter (and Brady would most likely say so).  The only people who's panties get all bunched up are those who try to use the "he carries the team" and "all he does is win" argument and disregard that he'd be better off with a more rounded approach.

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from GO47. Show GO47's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to ANONMD08's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to GO47's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     but McDaniels also remained committed to the run when it wasn't yielding huge gains in the first half. 

    [/QUOTE]

    You're going to do that when the opponent is noted as a poor run defender.

    [/QUOTE]


    Besides the Patriots the other 3 teams left are all good at run defense taken from ESPN:

    RK   TEAM             ATT   YDS    YDS/A    LONG  TD     YDS/G

    4

    SanFrancisco

    397  1535   3.9     30      11      95.9 7 Denver          420   1626  3.9      35     15      101.6 7  Seattle        422   1626  3.9      51       4      101.6

     

    As mentioned a lot of this has to do with who is in on your schedule. But Denver will be the 1st real test for this new Patriot running game. As stated good physical offensive lines can soften the front 7 making it easier to run during the 3rd and 4th quarters. Question is will the Patriots be behind then or ahead? It will be interesting to see just what the game plan is.

     

    Although having one of their DBs, Harris, put on IR with an torn ACL makes the passing game an attractive option. So we may see more passing from the Patriots for this game. But I would still make them respect the run first.

    [/QUOTE]


    Denver still has Rogers-Cromartie. It does take away the one side for Denver having to play Quinton Jammer.

    [/QUOTE]

    Sorry the format for the run defenses didn't hold. :-)

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Baffle. Show Baffle's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    An effective run game also let's us utilize one of Brady's most deadly tools in his arsenal - play action. Hopefully they make the holes big enough for Tommy to throw some daggers.


    At the end of the day, this matchup is going to come down to our Defense generating turnovers and if we can convert them to scores. Just go back to 2001 against the greatest show on turf... we couldn't stop Warner and Faulk from racking up those yards, but we got those critical turnovers to give us a chance.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to clouts' comment:
    [QUOTE]


    BB got wood in starting in 2006 and decided to go with his high-powered offense, and changed what made him successful:  ball control and a solid defense.  He put all his eggs in Brady's basket, and the results speak for themselves:  by trying to be an pass-first team, Brady's success is akin to Marino's....

     

    Overall, Brady's playoff stats are good, very good at times, but not 'out of this world' good.  He's not in the GOAT category with no running game and no defense.  He certainly doesn't separate himself from the pack like many seem he does.  I've said this for years, and in the end...this shouldn't matter (and Brady would most likely say so).  The only people who's panties get all bunched up are those who try to use the "he carries the team" and "all he does is win" argument and disregard that he'd be better off with a more rounded approach.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    ^

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from auchhhhhhhhhhh. Show auchhhhhhhhhhh's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to themightypatriots' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The Chargers ran the ball in vain for 3 quarters before finally scoring at will by passing.  Hopefully the Pats don't make the same mistake.

    [/QUOTE]

    again, do not compare the bolts OL + RB´s to ours. We are rolling!!! motivated!!! i dare any defensive unit to try to stop us for 3Q.

    I dont see another 45+ running plays game plan. But i do see 25 - 30+ runs in the game.

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from portfolio1. Show portfolio1's posts

    Re: Running the Ball is Key to Tom's Legacy

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Way to analyze with blinders on.

     

    I'll let you guess what the category below is, in which the Pats rated much higher than they did in the latter years you cite.

     

    2001 - #6

    2003 - #1

    2004 - #2

     

    This "magic bullet" theory that running equals winning is simply stupid. There are a lot of factors that go into winning it all.

     

    FAR more significant than simply running is having a runner that is feared. Blount might just be that guy at this point.

    [/QUOTE]

    Well said

     

     

Share