What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    Yes, Tom Brady, the best Qb in the game NEEDS a deep threat. I mean, he can't win without it.

    It is absolutely the only thing holding this offense back. Last year when we traded away the best deep threat in NFL history Brady really fell apart. He became the 1st unanimous mvp in league history. He was forced to throw 4 interceptions for the year without Randy Moss.

    I can't believe we have won 5 games without a deep threat. It is inconceivable. I mean look at the SB years when Troy Brown and Dieon Branch were burning people for  20 yards per catch on a regular basis.

    Wait, what? They never did that? They didn't need a deep threat at all? Huh? What? They only needed timely play calling? What a weird concept?

    Coaching may actually have an impact on winning? Perhaps that is why they pay coaches so much money??? So senseless, Roger, so Senseless.

    Bring in Randy Moss, its our only hope!!!! No, No, No, TRADE for somebody, then we'll win.


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]Deep throats are overrated.
    Posted by Patsfansince1966[/QUOTE]

    I gotta disagree with you again.  Do you make any correct statements?
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kevin13130. Show kevin13130's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    I agree with the idea, but I like to offer one correction. I think it's not so much the lack of a deep threat, as it is a lack of deep plays.

    What was so effective last year, Tom Brady's MVP year, was that we found a way to make big plays (20+ to 30+ yard completions) without a true deep threat. We didn't have a speed burner like Wallace or Jennings, but we still got big chunk yardage even with mostly short-intermediate passes.

    That simple point is illustrated by the difference between the first 4 games and second 4 games. We were very explosive on offense during those first 4 games, and that was because we had big plays (a lot from Welker, some from Gronk, even some from Branch). Brady had time in the pocket, and receivers had time to get downfield.

    In this second half, defenses switched up pressure and coverage, jammed our receivers by playing man, and has really limited our big play ability. This is when a deep threat would come in handy, because with Mike Wallace or Greg Jennings, we wouldn't necessarily need excellent protection and WR play. In other words, we wouldn't need everything to go right to make big plays. It's when speed and talent takes over.

    So I do agree we need a deep threat, but I felt it necessary to give a lengthy explanantion on what I think is actually missing on our offense.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dodie2g. Show dodie2g's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    DEFENSE!
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]Yeah I'd like to see how any of those so-called elite quarterbacks would do with New England's receivers.
    Posted by mighty2011[/QUOTE]

    Even better, I'd like to see what Brady could do with all those other receivers. 
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    The offense relies far too heavily on guys who run short routes. Worse, there really are only four regular receivers, two TEs (Gronk, Hernandez) and two slot guys (Welker, Branch).  For a team that likes to pass two-thirds of the time, we are very thin at guys who catch the ball. Add one, or preferably two, NFL-quality x-type WRs and this offense would be much better. Sprinkle in a quality running back and this offense would return to scoring 30+ points every game.  

    As it is, however, we've made game planning very simple for our opponents' defensive coordinators. Stop the two TEs, stop Welker and Branch, and be prepared for a few draws from Faulk and Woodhead and one or two straight-up runs when BJGE or Ridley is in and you're golden. You can bring your safeties up close to crowd the short zones, blitz an extra LB to put pressure on the middle of the line, get your DLs into the passing lanes, and wait for Brady to have to hurry a throw into coverage.  With all those guys close to the line, the chance for a tipped ball or an interception is high.  
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BubbaInHawaii. Show BubbaInHawaii's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    if it were only as simple as a deep theat.....
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from hardright. Show hardright's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    Adding a "deep threat" will only compound the problem on offense: they throw the ball too much.

    It's no coincidence, to me, that arguably their best "overall" games this year were the Oakland and NY Jets games, and it was in those games when they really focused on being more balanced and running the ball about half the time.

    The modern-day NFL is all about the passing game, yes, but teams with balanced attacks, in the end, are the ones who usually go farther.

    It was even pointed out during the Fox broadcast of the N.O./Tampa game on Sunday that in 2009, when the Saints won the Super Bowl, they ran more often and were more balanced than they've been in the last two years--and in the last two years they've been scoring a lot of points, sometimes, but getting shutdown in other games, and losing a lot more often.

    I think the Pats' offensive line is capable of being a good run-blocking line, but the O.C. doesn't give them enough opportunities to prove it IMO.

    And if you give them a new "deep threat" the notion of running the ball as no more than a novelty/diversionary tactic will never go away.


     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    I thought that was supposed to be Price but she can't get on the field.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsLifer. Show PatsLifer's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.


    A lot of people say, "We won SB's without a deep threat"....not entirely true. But point taken. A deep threat doesn't equal a SB. A deep threat equals the ability to do more than pass to WR/TE who run short to intermediate routes. Coupled with our short/intermediate game, and a solid run game, a deep game/threat is COMPLIMENTARY to what we already do. The mere threat of a deep threat would keep defenses somewhat honest...they can't bring safeties and everyone else into the box to crowd passing lanes and plug things up.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ddimaria. Show ddimaria's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]Deep throats are overrated.
    Posted by Patsfansince1966[/QUOTE]

    This post is the only one in the thread that I have to politely disagree with!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Evil2012. Show Evil2012's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    Rivers? You've got to be joking putting him in the same sentence with Rogers, Brady and Ben. Rivers hasn't done squat his entire career.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from portfolio1. Show portfolio1's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    I haven't read every post in this thread so I might have missed someone else making this observation but: Tom Brady, great as he is, has only decent accuracy going downfield more than 25 yards or so. He loses the advantages he has over most other QBs on the short and medium routes. The reason a deep threat WR is so important is simply to keep the D from clogging the shorter routes or for TB to make them pay. If a D doesn't respect the deep ball then a decent QB will make them pay if he reads the D quickly and correctly.

    Brady is not hitting his open deep shots when they have been there - though 85 did drop one well thrown ball earlier.

    So yes a real, dangerous deep threat (like Moss) would be great. But Brady needs to make those passes.

    So in answer to the question of the thread - and though Rivers is having a bad year for his level of play - those three QBs (especially Rodgers) are more consistent with their deep ball. Rodgers also can run and is a far better thrower on the run than Brady.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from tom2337. Show tom2337's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    Say all you want about deep threats.  The one thing the 3 "R"s have is - mobility.  They can run for 1st downs and throw on the run - something brady can't do.  let's facr it - Rogers is #1 QB last year and this year.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Artist-Frmrly-Knwn-As-NickC1188. Show Artist-Frmrly-Knwn-As-NickC1188's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]I love this thread! Why? Because it is absolutely true. This offense is nowhere near as "loaded" as people think or say. We have Welker and two tight ends. Try getting a pass interference call on a tight end when he is being covered by a wideout...nowhere near as likely if the guy was a 5'10" wide receiver. If you're a ref and you have a Gronk (6'5") going up against a 5'10" corner or safety and there is a little of bumping going on, you think he's going to throw that flag?! Heck no! He might not even see the corner with Gronk towering him. We can't just keep sending guys that run 4.6 forty-yard dash 30 yards down the field, that can't be our deep threat. You add a deep threat to this team...someone that is good and this offense might just be able to overcome this defense.
    Posted by mthurl[/QUOTE]

    +1
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Dessalines. Show Dessalines's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    So many experts, so little knowledge.  In two weeks time the fans tone here has degenerated from what used to be PATS speak to Red Sox babble, "Ooooooo, bwah, nothing's any good..."  Suddenly we can't do anything right?  What a bunch of babies.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    Wait a min I know what Rodgers, Ben, and Rivers all have in common. They are on teams that have a pass rush

    Do I getz a cookie nowz?
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]Adding a "deep threat" will only compound the problem on offense: they throw the ball too much. It's no coincidence, to me, that arguably their best "overall" games this year were the Oakland and NY Jets games, and it was in those games when they really focused on being more balanced and running the ball about half the time. The modern-day NFL is all about the passing game, yes, but teams with balanced attacks, in the end, are the ones who usually go farther. It was even pointed out during the Fox broadcast of the N.O./Tampa game on Sunday that in 2009, when the Saints won the Super Bowl, they ran more often and were more balanced than they've been in the last two years--and in the last two years they've been scoring a lot of points, sometimes, but getting shutdown in other games, and losing a lot more often. I think the Pats' offensive line is capable of being a good run-blocking line, but the O.C. doesn't give them enough opportunities to prove it IMO. And if you give them a new "deep threat" the notion of running the ball as no more than a novelty/diversionary tactic will never go away.
    Posted by hardright[/QUOTE]

    Spot on hardright.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from BelichickDisciple. Show BelichickDisciple's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    A healthy throwing shoulder. 

    I was convinced that Brady got hurt a few weeks ago (was it against Dallas?) when he scrambled for the goalline and got rolled over by the tackler. His throwing motion has not been the same since - his deep ball is gone and his accuracy has been consistently off. 

    Then last Monday I saw a blurb in the Globe that quoted someone overhearing Gisele telling their son that daddy couldn't pick him up because he was hurt. It must be pretty bad if he can't pick up a 2 year old.

    Injuries are not supposed to be an excuse, but its pretty tough to make tough throws in to tight coverages when your joints don't work right.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from FishTaco64. Show FishTaco64's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    I don't think it is lack of a "deep threat" but rather a lack of complete receivers.

    - Branch has sure hands and is in the right spot, but just doesn't have the burst to get consistent seperation anymore.

    - Edelman is quick and shifty, but has a hard time hanging on to the ball.

    - Hard to really tell with Ocho, he has had the drops, plus it seems he has had a tough time learning the offense.

    - Price is just an enigma. He had the physical tools, but he needs to get on the field and show what he can do.

    So that leaves Welker and the TEs. Looking at the above, if you were Brady and you were had to have a completion, where are you going to go with it? Defenses have figured it out.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from patsbandwagonsince76. Show patsbandwagonsince76's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    They all have a sh*t eating grin
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from cosmo14. Show cosmo14's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't...a desire to win at football.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]A healthy throwing shoulder.  I was convinced that Brady got hurt a few weeks ago (was it against Dallas?) when he scrambled for the goalline and got rolled over by the tackler. His throwing motion has not been the same since - his deep ball is gone and his accuracy has been consistently off.  Then last Monday I saw a blurb in the Globe that quoted someone overhearing Gisele telling their son that daddy couldn't pick him up because he was hurt. It must be pretty bad if he can't pick up a 2 year old. Injuries are not supposed to be an excuse, but its pretty tough to make tough throws in to tight coverages when your joints don't work right.
    Posted by BelichickDisciple[/QUOTE]
    I too think he has some arm/should issues going on.  His throw to Ocho Sunday was short, he has had his arm wrapped up on the sidelines in a game or two and then last week he was wearing that tension strap on his forearm of his throwing arm.  Something is going on there.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from pcmIV. Show pcmIV's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't. : I too think he has some arm/should issues going on.  His throw to Ocho Sunday was short, he has had his arm wrapped up on the sidelines in a game or two and then last week he was wearing that tension strap on his forearm of his throwing arm.  Something is going on there.
    Posted by TFB12[/QUOTE]

    I guess it's possible, but most guys are pretty dinged up this time of year.  The question is whether Brady is really dinged up.  I find that hard to believe just because to the extent he has been erratic throwing the ball the issue has been accuracy not strength.  If he had an injury as severe as the ones being hypothesized about I think it would affect his arm strength a lot more.  I realize he has had some short throws, but he has also rifled some ones in there.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: What does Aaron Rodgers, Ben Rothlisberger, and Phillip Rivers have that Brady doesn't.

    There is no denying that there is a ton of talent on the offensive side of the ball.  It's all about the offensive scheme.  It's not working! All this talent and don't know what to do with it.  It would be nice to run the ball more but there is a problem.  The defense is stacked to stop the short ball which means they are there ready for the run at the same time.  They need to spread the D out in order to run the ball.  How do you do this?  You need a legit threat that can take the top off the defense.  The Pats have that and this O would be unstoppable!  Welker, Branch, Gronk, Hernandez, and Mr. Deep Threat!  Man, o man, spread that defense and my grandmother with her walker could average 5 yards per carry in the run game.


     

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