A day that will live in infamy

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    A day that will live in infamy

    On this date in 1920, the dastardly Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a loan of $350,000, to finance a Broadway play, " No, No, Nannette." Thereby placing a curse on our Sox that would not be lifted until 2004. 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    Infamy and beyond.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    Or not...

    http://throneberryfieldsforever.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/no-no-not-quite/

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    O.K. Perhaps not beyond...

    Good read. Thanks, S5.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from craze4sox. Show craze4sox's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    On this date in 1920, the dastardly Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a loan of $350,000, to finance a Broadway play, " No, No, Nannette." Thereby placing a curse on our Sox that would not be lifted until 2004. 

    [/QUOTE]

    And all this time I thought the Babe was traded for consuming all the F & B for our fans.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedSoxDOrtiz. Show RedSoxDOrtiz's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    On this date in 1920, the dastardly Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a loan of $350,000, to finance a Broadway play, " No, No, Nannette." Thereby placing a curse on our Sox that would not be lifted until 2004. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Then 2004 created a new curse....

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedSoxDOrtiz. Show RedSoxDOrtiz's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to S5's comment:

    jus sayin...

    Harry Frazee.

    Jimmy Kimmel.... time traveling doppelgangers

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    it made 2004 that much sweeter.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    Actually, Ruth was sold to finance "My Lady Friends", not "No, No Nanette"...

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    BTW that day has long been forgotten by all RS fans living and dead.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    On this date in 1920, the dastardly Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a loan of $350,000, to finance a Broadway play, " No, No, Nannette." Thereby placing a curse on our Sox that would not be lifted until 2004. 

    [/QUOTE]Not ever to be confused with the  "REAL DAY OF INFAMY"  !!!


     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    The real day of infamy is Aug. 6, 2008.

    Tongue Out

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to royf19's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The real day of infamy is Aug. 6, 2008.

    Tongue Out

    [/QUOTE]


    I'll bite. I give up. I'm not sure which event you are referring to.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

    [/QUOTE]


    It worked better for Cherington than it did for Frazee. A Broadway show cannot hit, pitch or play defense.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from crix. Show crix's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    Didn't this season bury every lingering reminder of 1918, the curse, Babe Ruth, etc.?  Time to move on.  No need to rehash it over and over again.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    People should stop talking about the trade having anything to do with a play. That's a fairy tale. This guy was paid to give Babe Ruth to the Yankees. The play angle, even if some money was used for a play in New York, was probably just a cover. IMO both sides were working for New York.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to RedSoxDOrtiz's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    On this date in 1920, the dastardly Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a loan of $350,000, to finance a Broadway play, " No, No, Nannette." Thereby placing a curse on our Sox that would not be lifted until 2004. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Then 2004 created a new curse....

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL. I've never seen that one.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to youkillus' comment:


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.



    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays. This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays. This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     



    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays. This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, and no. Frazee wasn't part of a NY conspiracy; at that point, he was more interested in wine, women, and song than owning a baseball team; especially when the former items resulted in financial difficulties, and like the As of the teens, the A's of the early 30s, the Marlins of recent vintage, and other teams, when finances became rocky, teams had fire-sales, which usually resulted in perennial losers going forward.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays.This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, and no. Frazee wasn't part of a NY conspiracy; at that point, he was more interested in wine, women, and song than owning a baseball team; especially when the former items resulted in financial difficulties, and like the As of the teens, the A's of the early 30s, the Marlins of recent vintage, and other teams, when finances became rocky, teams had fire-sales, which usually resulted in perennial losers going forward.

    [/QUOTE]

    He was paid by the Yankees. The whole Broadway play, in New York, was the cover for it. The whole wine, women and song only plays into the nonsense. To this day, people still say how awful it was to make the trade for financing a play. It boggles the mind they still believe that.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     

     



    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays.This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, and no. Frazee wasn't part of a NY conspiracy; at that point, he was more interested in wine, women, and song than owning a baseball team; especially when the former items resulted in financial difficulties, and like the As of the teens, the A's of the early 30s, the Marlins of recent vintage, and other teams, when finances became rocky, teams had fire-sales, which usually resulted in perennial losers going forward.

    [/QUOTE]

    He was paid by the Yankees. The whole Broadway play, in New York, was the cover for it. The whole wine, women and song only plays into the nonsense. To this day, people still say how awful it was to make the trade for financing a play. It boggles the mind they still believe that.

    [/QUOTE]

    For the players, yes. He also had political issues with then AL President Ban Johnson, who railroaded him into only dealing with the NYY and White Sox.  Otherwise, do you have some inside knowledge on this subject?

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays.This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

     

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, and no. Frazee wasn't part of a NY conspiracy; at that point, he was more interested in wine, women, and song than owning a baseball team; especially when the former items resulted in financial difficulties, and like the As of the teens, the A's of the early 30s, the Marlins of recent vintage, and other teams, when finances became rocky, teams had fire-sales, which usually resulted in perennial losers going forward.

    [/QUOTE]

    He was paid by the Yankees. The whole Broadway play, in New York, was the cover for it. The whole wine, women and song only plays into the nonsense. To this day, people still say how awful it was to make the trade for financing a play. It boggles the mind they still believe that.

    [/QUOTE]

    For the players, yes. He also had political issues with then AL President Ban Johnson, who railroaded him into only dealing with the NYY and White Sox.  Otherwise, do you have some inside knowledge on this subject?

    [/QUOTE]

    Don't get me started on "AL presidents" or MLB presidents for that matter, and the teams they favor.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: A day that will live in infamy

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     


    Interesting, Frazee's recipe for success, may have been borrowed by Cherington; A team of players working harmoniously together is always to be preferred to that possessing one star who hugs the limelight to himself . . .

    enter Jonny Gomes and Shane Victorino, exit Carl Crawford, and A-Gon, stage left.

     

     

     



    Except Frazee dismantled a great team; other players going from Bos to the NYY at this time included Dugan, Hoyt, Pennock, and Mays.This was largely due to GM Edward Barrow, who also moved from Boston. All but Dugan and Mays, who were pretty good players themselves, are HOFers, including Barrow

     

     

     

    The relatively inexperienced Cherington reconfigured a team which resulted in a historical swing from a 48 yr low to a Title in back-to-back seasons. That's a big difference.

    [/QUOTE]

    There ya go. That's what I was saying.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, and no. Frazee wasn't part of a NY conspiracy; at that point, he was more interested in wine, women, and song than owning a baseball team; especially when the former items resulted in financial difficulties, and like the As of the teens, the A's of the early 30s, the Marlins of recent vintage, and other teams, when finances became rocky, teams had fire-sales, which usually resulted in perennial losers going forward.

    [/QUOTE]

    He was paid by the Yankees. The whole Broadway play, in New York, was the cover for it. The whole wine, women and song only plays into the nonsense. To this day, people still say how awful it was to make the trade for financing a play. It boggles the mind they still believe that.

    [/QUOTE]

    For the players, yes. He also had political issues with then AL President Ban Johnson, who railroaded him into only dealing with the NYY and White Sox.  Otherwise, do you have some inside knowledge on this subject?

    [/QUOTE]

    Don't get me started on "AL presidents" or MLB presidents for that matter, and the teams they favor.

    [/QUOTE]

    Got it.

     

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