AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    In Response to AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!:
    [QUOTE]By Peter Abraham, Globe Staff So much for the American League East. The 100-win Red Sox won 90 games. The miracle Rays lost in four games in their division series and the mighty Yankees lost twice at home in their series. The Red Sox have plenty of issues. But Alex Rodriguez was 2 for 18 in the series against Detroit and struck out six times. He is 36 and has six years and $147 million left on his deal including what's left of his signing bonus. Yikes. The Red Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games. Makes you wonder whether they're going about it the right way.
    Posted by 2004Idiots[/QUOTE]

    No, the Yankees won two games.
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    However:

    -The Yankees have only missed the playoffs once since 1995.
    -The playoffs are a crapshoot. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from sindarin-erebor. Show sindarin-erebor's posts

    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    To me the AL East "Beast" Division is starting to crack. Tough Division no doubt, but definately not as tough lately. The Central with the Tigers surge this year along with Cleveland showing competitiveness this year and I have to think the White Sox will be better next year. The West has become much better recently with the Rangers and Angels. In the East, the Yankees are getting old, the Red Sox are a total mess coming in third the past two years and getting swept in round one in 09. Just saying, the AL East is in decline.
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    All I know is that for the 2nd straight year, the N.E. corridor of the USA is quiet.
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    "Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!"

    Correction, the Yankess only won 2 playoff games, the Sox won 0.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from WeNeedaManager. Show WeNeedaManager's posts

    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    Red Sox lost 1/2 their pitching staff to injury.  Yankees lost in the winter meetings Laughing
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    Well, I just think that both Yankees and Boston never thought that their starting rotation will be a problem this year.  During the opening day roster, Yankees had Phil Hughes, Joba, CC, Burnett, Garcia, Nova and Colon to start with while Boston had Bucholtz, Lester, Lackey, Beckett, Wakefield, Aceves, and Dice K.  That is six plus starting pitchers for both teams which that looked pretty deep especially on Boston side, but somehow half of them didnt finish the season with the team. They both just never saw it coming.  And it was hard to fix the rotation cuz there are not much pitchers available at the trading deadline.  That what hurt both club. 

    That is why it is important for Boston to have a good farm system where they could probably can find at least one or two talent pitchers to be call up just like Detriot, Texas, Tampa, Milwaukee, Arizona, etc all did in the past two years!!  That is why hurting Boston right now!!  Buying pitching doesnt exists for Boston anymore!!
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    In Response to Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!:
    [QUOTE]To me the AL East "Beast" Division is starting to crack. Tough Division no doubt, but definately not as tough lately. The Central with the Tigers surge this year along with Cleveland showing competitiveness this year and I have to think the White Sox will be better next year. The West has become much better recently with the Rangers and Angels. In the East, the Yankees are getting old, the Red Sox are a total mess coming in third the past two years and getting swept in round one in 09. Just saying, the AL East is in decline.
    Posted by sindarin-erebor[/QUOTE]

    When the 2012 season opens the Yank's & Sox will once again be among the AL favorites and so too will the Rays...in 2013 all three will again be in the mix and so on...I wouldn't be too quick to dismiss any of the AL East powers...

    Texas has the guns to stay in the hunt but they have to resign or replace CJ Wilson this offseason and 2012 is the last year of Hamitons, Kinsler and Napoli deals...So we'll see if they can maintain their playoff momentum over the next 3 to 5 years...Ditto teams like the Rays, who simply can't afford to sign players once they reach arb 3 years....
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    Both the Red Sox and Yankees need to get younger.

    Both teams need to take a step back and continue building youthful talent in the farm system. Both teams have produced a few good young players, but both have also traded away players who would be in their prime years right now in exchange for that player that can help right away.

    The Rays do not have the resources to "run" with the Red Sox and Yanks if these two superpowers spend money more wisely. Throwing long term contracts at players who are in their best years now is stupid and saddles teams with an albatross for the later years of these contracts.

    For example, I would say that Jacoby Ellsbury is well worth keeping and he deserves to be resigned at a higher rate of pay. But his agent is Borass and he will undoubtedly compare Jacoby's numbers with a player like Crawford and look for a long term deal. I wouldn't do this, I would let him walk before I retained him until age 37 or 38 because speed is a big part of his game and his speed will surely decline before then. I would never have signed Beckett for more than two years as his best years have gone by and now we are stuck with him, ditto Lackey.

    GM's need to get back to short term contracts and stop retaining high salaried players for long term. This encourages complacency and these guys get fat and lazy. I would rather have younger players who have never won a title as they are hungrier and faster.

    The game needs to change in the way big market teams run their "arms race"...throwing money at talent with huge egos isn't working and the small market teams (Baltimore, Tampa Bay, Texas, Arizona) look more alive and stronger in the latter part of the season and postseason.

    It is now more than ever , a young man's game.
     
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    Re: AL East-Toughest Division in MLB-NOT!-Sox and Yankees dropped roughly $363 million and won two playoff games!

    Peter Abraham is full of it.   

    This year the AL East winner had the best record in the AL, and the top two teams contending for the wild card were Tampa and Boston, both from the AL East, with Tampa winning on the last day.

    Success or lack thereof in the playoffs doesn't prove much--unless, of course, you go 86 years without winning a WS.  Ever since the Yankees won two straight WS about ten years ago, MLB has shown amazing balance in the playoffs.  The team with the best W-L record in MLB each year continues to be a longshot to actually win the WS.  Wild cards have done just as well.  Better still, in the ten years since the Yankees won WS back to back, every MLB division has produced at least one WS champ, with the AL East having the most at 3. 

    The simple fact is, having eight teams in the playoffs produces a gauntlet that can defeat the best of teams. 

    This year is a great example.  Forget the Yankees losing to the Tigers, and look at the two NL NLDS series.  The favored Brewers won the first two over the Diamondbacks, but now have to win back in Milwaukee to get to the NLCS.   

    And the Phillies, with the best record and absolutely the best pitching--you know, pitching, the sine qua non for postseason success--in MLB this year have to win tonight at home against the Cardinals or they are out.  Their big three starters haven't looked all that great, just as Sabathia didn't look that great.  Or the sterling Tampa Bay Rays pitchers.  Nova, the Yankees youngster who was so great the last half of the 2011 season, gave up two solo dingers to the Tigers in the first inning last night. 

    As for spending money on players, one wonders what Peter Abraham expects consistently effective teams who also do well at the game and on TV--that is, they make a good profit--should be doing with those profits. 

    Oh, I know, dump those good players and try to get much cheaper ones who can maybe win and maybe not.  I love what the Rays do with their small payroll, but it's also a fact that nobody wants to see them play and certainly no one in Tampa.  In game four in Tampa, 28,000 showed up for a play off game. 

    Teams like the Yankees, Sox, Mets, Cubs, etc have to make the effort to replenish and/or retain the best players.  Moneyball and other statistical approaches notwithstanding, it is still difficult to find the right players and get them for the best prices.  And, when you are in a big market or have a rabid following, they don't want to hear, "well, this is a rebuilding year."  Imagine John Henry trying that line in Boston. 

     

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