Bud Selig to retire

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    Bud Selig to retire

    MLB announced that Bud Selig will retire as commissioner at the end of his term in 2015. Selig has managed to maintain labor peace while growing attendance, salaries and profits. MLB.COM and MLB.TV have been huge successes under his care. Steroid use increased and only under pressure from Congress did Selig began to address cheating and illegal activity in his business. Franchise net worth increased astronomically under Bud, and players happy to get millions have yet to latch onto an equity position in the real "business" of the game.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from andrewmitch. Show andrewmitch's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    Next Stop:  HELL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to youkillus's comment:

    MLB announced that Bud Selig will retire as commissioner at the end of his term in 2015. Selig has managed to maintain labor peace while growing attendance, salaries and profits. MLB.COM and MLB.TV have been huge successes under his care. Steroid use increased and only under pressure from Congress did Selig began to address cheating and illegal activity in his business. Franchise net worth increased astronomically under Bud, and players happy to get millions have yet to latch onto an equity position in the real "business" of the game.



    Selig's legacy will be mixed. He did some good things, did some things I didn't like. Blaming him for the steroids isn't fair. Perhaps someone with Giamati's stature might have been able to get something done, but I doubt it because of the union. When you state it took an act of Congress, that's what it took to get the union to relent.

    You can't overstate the power of the union back then. Any time Selig broached the subject of any sort of drug testing -- PED or anything -- the union balked. And after how 1994/95 labor dispute hurt the game, I don't blame him for not being aggressive in 1999 when the CBO came up again. Any aggressive effort on Selig and the owners part would have shut down the game again. There were other issues that could have done the same thing and he was just trying to get a labor deal done w/o any sort of work stoppage, something that never was done since Marvin Miller started the union.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    maybe the new comish will eliminate that dreadful W/L stat for pitchers...

    Some say a storm is coming, Some say the end is near.

    Some think it's all so hazy, I think it's all so clear.

    Some say they have the answers, some say they know the truth.

    Some people live in question, some people have no clue.

    If there was no tomorrow, if there was just today.

    would you make different choices? or would you stay the same?

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to royf19's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to youkillus's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     


    Selig's legacy will be mixed. He did some good things, did some things I didn't like. Blaming him for the steroids isn't fair. Perhaps someone with Giamati's stature might have been able to get something done, but I doubt it because of the union. When you state it took an act of Congress, that's what it took to get the union to relent.

     

    You can't overstate the power of the union back then. Any time Selig broached the subject of any sort of drug testing -- PED or anything -- the union balked. And after how 1994/95 labor dispute hurt the game, I don't blame him for not being aggressive in 1999 when the CBO came up again. Any aggressive effort on Selig and the owners part would have shut down the game again. There were other issues that could have done the same thing and he was just trying to get a labor deal done w/o any sort of work stoppage, something that never was done since Marvin Miller started the union.

     

    great job roy


    while a lot of buds financial successes

    has to do lucky timing of  the invention of DVR's , expansion of the net

    and teams having their own tv stations

    he's done some major things with wild cards and replay

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to royf19's comment:

     

    In response to youkillus's comment:

     

     

     

    MLB announced that Bud Selig will retire as commissioner at the end of his term in 2015. Selig has managed to maintain labor peace while growing attendance, salaries and profits. MLB.COM and MLB.TV have been huge successes under his care. Steroid use increased and only under pressure from Congress did Selig began to address cheating and illegal activity in his business. Franchise net worth increased astronomically under Bud, and players happy to get millions have yet to latch onto an equity position in the real "business" of the game.

     

     



    Selig's legacy will be mixed. He did some good things, did some things I didn't like. Blaming him for the steroids isn't fair. Perhaps someone with Giamati's stature might have been able to get something done, but I doubt it because of the union. When you state it took an act of Congress, that's what it took to get the union to relent.

     

     

    You can't overstate the power of the union back then. Any time Selig broached the subject of any sort of drug testing -- PED or anything -- the union balked. And after how 1994/95 labor dispute hurt the game, I don't blame him for not being aggressive in 1999 when the CBO came up again. Any aggressive effort on Selig and the owners part would have shut down the game again. There were other issues that could have done the same thing and he was just trying to get a labor deal done w/o any sort of work stoppage, something that never was done since Marvin Miller started the union.

     

     



    Sory but I don't buy the union excuse...and like Bonds and his ilk Selig deserves and asterisk next to his name. In the end he was a party to and he and his accomplices aka the owners made millions knowing full well that they were and still are peddling a tainted product...it took an act of congress just to get him off his azz. Still today all involved are merely enablers afraid to kill the goose that layed the golden egg. Sorry but that will be his legesey whether he likes it or not...

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

     

    greetings BT

    U & me have been thru this 100 times

    I thought roy did a great job covering it

    so I'll just repost this quote from the former commish

     

    "I'm not sure exactly what you'd say was Bud's crime? I mean, what was he supposed to do?" former commissioner Fay Vincent said. "He has no magic wand.

     

     

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

     

    Now that Bud Selig has announced he will retire following the 2014 season, speculation has already begun about who will be Major League Baseball's next commissioner.  ESPN's Jayson Stark thinks it would be "a monumental upset" if MLB doesn't go with an internal candidate, and the favorites are league executive vice-presidents Rob Manfred and Tim Brosnan, and MLB Advanced Media CEO Bob Bowman.  Yahoo Sports' Jeff Passan hears that Manfred is the safest and most well-rounded pick, though some sources consider Brosnan to be the better candidate.  Stark and Passan list such names as Tigers GM Dave Dombrowski, Mets GM Sandy Alderson, Indians president Mark Shapiro and Diamondbacks president Derrick Hall as other possible choices.

     

    what !!

     no love for bob costa

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:


    while a lot of buds financial successes

    has to do lucky timing of  the invention of DVR's , expansion of the net

    and teams having their own tv stations

    he's done some major things with wild cards and replay

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I forgot to include the huge addition of the lux tax ( once tweaked)

    and his efforts to make the draft fairer along with international players

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

    greetings BT

    U & me have been thru this 100 times

    I thought roy did a great job covering it

    so I'll just repost this quote from the former commish

     

    "I'm not sure exactly what you'd say was Bud's crime? I mean, what was he supposed to do?" former commissioner Fay Vincent said. "He has no magic wand.

     

     

     



    Zac,

    We have seems like more tha 100 though....Hey my friend I get that we differ on this issue and it's doubful that we'll ever be on the same page. Doesn't mean I don't repsect your views on this...

    Regarding Selig and his involvement in the escalation of use under his watch...I can to some degree forgive his lack of initiative once it became clear that "Houston we have a problem" and the sensitivity he had towards keeping the players on the field v drawing a line and forcing the union to strike. My issue with he and the owners are that they are enablers of those that chose to use by not taking a tougher stance on those that have failed a test...My issue with Selig in particular is that he and the owners have hiden behind the CBA, just like Fehr and the players association did and have for the better part of what is now 3 decades. Instead of owning it they've made it a player issue. However last time I checked it was the owners that wrote the checks...

    IMHO Selig had the chance to make a very strong stance after the congressional hearings to once and for all make the penalty for use such that it would be prohibitive...In the end he knows, you know and I know that the game needs the marque names to fill stadiums and as such the owners themselves are just a complict as he and they've been playing a shell game for the better part of two decades. Sorry but I don't and will never buy into excusing him for his invlovement in creating the envoirnment that facilitated and enables player to cheat...

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

     

    I wish the second wild card berth was available in 2011 instead of 2012.   LOL

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to royf19's comment:

     

    In response to youkillus's comment:

     

     

    MLB announced that Bud Selig will retire as commissioner at the end of his term in 2015. Selig has managed to maintain labor peace while growing attendance, salaries and profits. MLB.COM and MLB.TV have been huge successes under his care. Steroid use increased and only under pressure from Congress did Selig began to address cheating and illegal activity in his business. Franchise net worth increased astronomically under Bud, and players happy to get millions have yet to latch onto an equity position in the real "business" of the game.

     

     



    Selig's legacy will be mixed. He did some good things, did some things I didn't like. Blaming him for the steroids isn't fair. Perhaps someone with Giamati's stature might have been able to get something done, but I doubt it because of the union. When you state it took an act of Congress, that's what it took to get the union to relent.

     

     

    You can't overstate the power of the union back then. Any time Selig broached the subject of any sort of drug testing -- PED or anything -- the union balked. And after how 1994/95 labor dispute hurt the game, I don't blame him for not being aggressive in 1999 when the CBO came up again. Any aggressive effort on Selig and the owners part would have shut down the game again. There were other issues that could have done the same thing and he was just trying to get a labor deal done w/o any sort of work stoppage, something that never was done since Marvin Miller started the union.

     




    Then, in reality, the union is the real Commissioner of Baseball. Edit: Although, after reading Beantowne's post, he has a very impressive argument. Funny, for whatever reason, I didn't see him as a person coming out as strongly against steroids. Again, really impressive.

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    Surprising, really, that the commissioner can come from the pool of owners. The genesis of the position was to protect the owners from themselves as enunciated in the phrase, "for the good of the game". With the owners firmly in control of the hen house, the balance has tilted toward enriching the owners, whether through tacit approval of steroids, which was an attendance driver or through franchise merchandising the owners have taken advantage of a weak union to have their way.

     The players ought to recognize that they have a minority claim on the franchises, and whenever one is sold, the appreciation of that franchise ought to be pro-rated and added to their retirements and salaries.

     No one has EVER lost money on an MLB franchise, in fact it is a license to print money. Poor old Ex-Dodger owner Frank McCourt just gave $100M to Georgetown University, this after finagling the team through bankruptcy to keep it from the hands of his ex-wife.

    Doesn't he owe something to the players pension fund??

     The players are fat dumb and happy to take a few million from the owners in salary, while they leave BILLIONS on the table in profits! As head of the union, I would start there.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire


    FTR I, how shall I say this, strongly dislike Bud Selig. And FTR to credit him with advances in replay in 2014 is ridiculous. How long has that actually been available to him? And what would the union's argument actually be for the years it hasn't been in place? We like to call 'em as well see 'em? That's worked out great, I guess, for some teams.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to youkillus' comment:

    Surprising, really, that the commissioner can come from the pool of owners. The genesis of the position was to protect the owners from themselves as enunciated in the phrase, "for the good of the game". With the owners firmly in control of the hen house, the balance has tilted toward enriching the owners, whether through tacit approval of steroids, which was an attendance driver or through franchise merchandising the owners have taken advantage of a weak union to have their way.

     The players ought to recognize that they have a minority claim on the franchises, and whenever one is sold, the appreciation of that franchise ought to be pro-rated and added to their retirements and salaries.

     No one has EVER lost money on an MLB franchise, in fact it is a license to print money. Poor old Ex-Dodger owner Frank McCourt just gave $100M to Georgetown University, this after finagling the team through bankruptcy to keep it from the hands of his ex-wife.

    Doesn't he owe something to the players pension fund??

     The players are fat dumb and happy to take a few million from the owners in salary, while they leave BILLIONS on the table in profits! As head of the union, I would start there.




    very surprised to hear some one say that youk

    while nothings perfect

    the BB union, while not tested recently  thanks 2 bud

    is constantly referred to as being very strong

    certainly in the sports world

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

     


    FTR I, how shall I say this, strongly dislike Bud Selig. And FTR to credit him with advances in replay in 2014 is ridiculous. How long has that actually been available to him? And what would the union's argument actually be for the years it hasn't been in place? We like to call 'em as well see 'em? That's worked out great, I guess, for some teams.

     



    how long has everyone been in favor of it

     

    some people are still against it

    mostly because of time concerns

    but others, like me  fear it hurts to the future of BB folklore

     

     

     

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire


    The real question is who replaces him.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    Then, in reality, the union is the real Commissioner of Baseball. Edit: Although, after reading Beantowne's post, he has a very impressive argument. Funny, for whatever reason, I didn't see him as a person coming out as strongly against steroids. Again, really impressive.

    Kim,

    Thank you for the kind words. My stance on the use of steriods has been consistent from the beginning. I see it as both a detriment to the integrity of the game with far reaching social implications. Not unlike what became the norm in the game of football in the early 80's where kids in high school began to use in order to keep up with the joneses. The use became so prevalent that  an entire generation of high school and college playes started to use to put themselves in position to be drafted or just to make thier teams...I see a strong parallel in baseball where countless minor leaguers have tested positive and many of the top high schoolers are now faced with a choice to use. A choice driven by the desire to compete on an even playing field. However for many of the top players like Braun and Melky. The reward in making it to the big leagues and posting numbers is where the pot of gold is waiting at the end of the rainbow. 

    Melky is the case study IMHO...He failed a test, tried to create an elaborate ruse by "creating his own web site, was suspended for 50 games, never apologized to the Giants for his transgression and was then rewarded in the offseason by the Blue Jays with another multi million dollar contract good work if you can get it. Tell me again exactly how well the new testing program is working? 

    In the end MLB under the leadership of Selig, took a page out of the "how to manage the public perception of steroid use in the game" out of the NFL's book. Both hid behind the CBA and have made it a player problem, both implemented a testing policy with holes large enough to drive a herd of elephants through. With penalties designed to dupe we the fans into believing they were in fact making every effort to police the sport. When in fact all they were doing was to protect the product by making the penalties for use such that players would miss time, but still be allowed to take the field, while still being able to take advantage of the benefits of using. A dynamic that still exist today and will for the foreseeable future. Three strikes and you're out...really. This is where I see the owners being complicit because it is they that benefit from the production of the players and it is they that write the checks. 

    If both leagues truly want to end the use of Peds in their respective sports. They have to take a tougher stance and not reward players that use...starting with a two year ban after one positive test, voiding of the contract with a stimulation that if they chose to apply for reinstatement during the suspension they have to submit to monthly random blood test. it's not rocket science, until they ramp up the penalties for use the shell game will continue and the use of Peds will continue to permeate the sport...Further IMHO i think there needs to be consequences for the teams and the agents by mandating that all teams must implement a pre signing testing of all player with a signed affidavit by all parties stating the player has passed and is clean then if the player the is found to have used. The team, the agent and the player is penalize...this was my stance back in the late 90's and remains my stance today. In fact pinstripe Zac once referred to my stance as beantownism...

    In closing, I am a fan of the game and will continue to be...which makes me just as complicit as the players, agents, owners, the heads of the union and Selig himself. I however don't have a seat at the table and will have to trust that those that do one day will figure it out...in the meantime I'll continue to be a fan, root, root, root for the home team. Trust me I will not and won't allow any of those involved to pass the buck. Selig sits in the place of power so in my mind it is he that must bear the greatest burden of guilt and the stain of this era should be a footnote on his plaque at Cooperstown...,just like Bonds and Clemens...

     

     

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to Beantowne's comment:

    Then, in reality, the union is the real Commissioner of Baseball. Edit: Although, after reading Beantowne's post, he has a very impressive argument. Funny, for whatever reason, I didn't see him as a person coming out as strongly against steroids. Again, really impressive.

    Kim,

    Thank you for the kind words. My stance on the use of steriods has been consistent from the beginning. I see it as both a detriment to the integrity of the game with far reaching social implications. Not unlike what became the norm in the game of football in the early 80's where kids in high school began to use in order to keep up with the joneses. The use became so prevalent that  an entire generation of high school and college playes started to use to put themselves in position to be drafted or just to make thier teams...I see a strong parallel in baseball where countless minor leaguers have tested positive and many of the top high schoolers are now faced with a choice to use. A choice driven by the desire to compete on an even playing field. However for many of the top players like Braun and Melky. The reward in making it to the big leagues and posting numbers is where the pot of gold is waiting at the end of the rainbow. 

    Melky is the case study IMHO...He failed a test, tried to create an elaborate ruse by "creating his own web site, was suspended for 50 games, never apologized to the Giants for his transgression and was then rewarded in the offseason by the Blue Jays with another multi million dollar contract good work if you can get it. Tell me again exactly how well the new testing program is working? 

    In the end MLB under the leadership of Selig, took a page out of the "how to manage the public perception of steroid use in the game" out of the NFL's book. Both hid behind the CBA and have made it a player problem, both implemented a testing policy with holes large enough to drive a herd of elephants through. With penalties designed to dupe we the fans into believing they were in fact making every effort to police the sport. When in fact all they were doing was to protect the product by making the penalties for use such that players would miss time, but still be allowed to take the field, while still being able to take advantage of the benefits of using. A dynamic that still exist today and will for the foreseeable future. Three strikes and you're out...really. This is where I see the owners being complicit because it is they that benefit from the production of the players and it is they that write the checks. 

    If both leagues truly want to end the use of Peds in their respective sports. They have to take a tougher stance and not reward players that use...starting with a two year ban after one positive test, voiding of the contract with a stimulation that if they chose to apply for reinstatement during the suspension they have to submit to monthly random blood test. it's not rocket science, until they ramp up the penalties for use the shell game will continue and the use of Peds will continue to permeate the sport...Further IMHO i think there needs to be consequences for the teams and the agents by mandating that all teams must implement a pre signing testing of all player with a signed affidavit by all parties stating the player has passed and is clean then if the player the is found to have used. The team, the agent and the player is penalize...this was my stance back in the late 90's and remains my stance today. In fact pinstripe Zac once referred to my stance as beantownism...

    In closing, I am a fan of the game and will continue to be...which makes me just as complicit as the players, agents, owners, the heads of the union and Selig himself. I however don't have a seat at the table and will have to trust that those that do one day will figure it out...in the meantime I'll continue to be a fan, root, root, root for the home team. Trust me I will not and won't allow any of those involved to pass the buck. Selig sits in the place of power so in my mind it is he that must bear the greatest burden of guilt and the stain of this era should be a footnote on his plaque at Cooperstown...,just like Bonds and Clemens...

     


    Wow.  I like it. 

    I recognized some time ago that the owners have no real (negative) stake in eliminating PED use but I didn't have a solution to it.  You're right.  Make everyone involved complicit in it.  As long as the owners are able to turn their backs on the problem they will continue to do that.  When it starts to hurt them both in the court of public opinion AND in the pocketbook, then they'll work with the union to eliminate PED use.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazyworldoftroybrown. Show crazyworldoftroybrown's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire


    GOOOD !!!

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to Beantowne's comment:

    Then, in reality, the union is the real Commissioner of Baseball. Edit: Although, after reading Beantowne's post, he has a very impressive argument. Funny, for whatever reason, I didn't see him as a person coming out as strongly against steroids. Again, really impressive.

    Kim,

    Thank you for the kind words. My stance on the use of steriods has been consistent from the beginning. I see it as both a detriment to the integrity of the game with far reaching social implications. Not unlike what became the norm in the game of football in the early 80's where kids in high school began to use in order to keep up with the joneses. The use became so prevalent that  an entire generation of high school and college playes started to use to put themselves in position to be drafted or just to make thier teams...I see a strong parallel in baseball where countless minor leaguers have tested positive and many of the top high schoolers are now faced with a choice to use. A choice driven by the desire to compete on an even playing field. However for many of the top players like Braun and Melky. The reward in making it to the big leagues and posting numbers is where the pot of gold is waiting at the end of the rainbow. 

    Melky is the case study IMHO...He failed a test, tried to create an elaborate ruse by "creating his own web site, was suspended for 50 games, never apologized to the Giants for his transgression and was then rewarded in the offseason by the Blue Jays with another multi million dollar contract good work if you can get it. Tell me again exactly how well the new testing program is working? 

    In the end MLB under the leadership of Selig, took a page out of the "how to manage the public perception of steroid use in the game" out of the NFL's book. Both hid behind the CBA and have made it a player problem, both implemented a testing policy with holes large enough to drive a herd of elephants through. With penalties designed to dupe we the fans into believing they were in fact making every effort to police the sport. When in fact all they were doing was to protect the product by making the penalties for use such that players would miss time, but still be allowed to take the field, while still being able to take advantage of the benefits of using. A dynamic that still exist today and will for the foreseeable future. Three strikes and you're out...really. This is where I see the owners being complicit because it is they that benefit from the production of the players and it is they that write the checks. 

    If both leagues truly want to end the use of Peds in their respective sports. They have to take a tougher stance and not reward players that use...starting with a two year ban after one positive test, voiding of the contract with a stimulation that if they chose to apply for reinstatement during the suspension they have to submit to monthly random blood test. it's not rocket science, until they ramp up the penalties for use the shell game will continue and the use of Peds will continue to permeate the sport...Further IMHO i think there needs to be consequences for the teams and the agents by mandating that all teams must implement a pre signing testing of all player with a signed affidavit by all parties stating the player has passed and is clean then if the player the is found to have used. The team, the agent and the player is penalize...this was my stance back in the late 90's and remains my stance today. In fact pinstripe Zac once referred to my stance as beantownism...

    In closing, I am a fan of the game and will continue to be...which makes me just as complicit as the players, agents, owners, the heads of the union and Selig himself. I however don't have a seat at the table and will have to trust that those that do one day will figure it out...in the meantime I'll continue to be a fan, root, root, root for the home team. Trust me I will not and won't allow any of those involved to pass the buck. Selig sits in the place of power so in my mind it is he that must bear the greatest burden of guilt and the stain of this era should be a footnote on his plaque at Cooperstown...,just like Bonds and Clemens...

     

     

     



    Another great post. At the very least you have to wonder why MLB has no concern for all the young players out their wrecking their bodies to keep up with adults that should know better. Wasn't ARod "mentoring" Montero at one point?

    I, too, was stunned when Melky got that contract. What kind of message does that send? Didn't seem to bother MLB, and they get involved in plenty of contract negotiations.

    And I agree with S5. The saddest part of this whole thing is that you're not at the table when these issues are being discussed. You really should be. :)

     
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    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    In response to crazyworldoftroybrown's comment:


    GOOOD !!!



    +1

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire


    Great posts Beantowne, in line with that great commandment, "follow the money". All parties with a financial interest ought tto have a financial stake in the integrity of the game.

    Zac, the reason I say the union is weak, is two parts, first one is allowing Selig, a sitting owner, to become the commmissioner in the first place. That shifted the job description away from "the good of the game", which tacitly concerns the intersts of the players to one of, "for the interests of the owners". There is no way a strong Union allows this power grab to happen. The second reason is the real money in baseball is not made through tickets and TV deals, although there is a ton coming from there, the real money comes from franchise appreciation. Recent sales of the Cubs, Rangers, Dodgers and Astros are off the charts. Two of these franchises sold due to poor business acumen in the owner's other businesses, (Cubs and Rangers), the Dodgers were dumped due to McCourt's divorce, and the 'Stros were sold after the owner decided to retire. All were sold with tremendous appreciation. There was never any risk of the owner not "making" it, plus the other owners can reject any offer to purchase a team, which allows them the ability to set the value of the available franchise, and artificially inflate the value of their own. Until the players negotiate a place at the table in franchise sales, they will in my mind be weak. After all, the union could blacklist a franchise and tell players not to sign there, thereby decreasing the incentive to purchase a team.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    a very interesting answer youk


    Great posts Beantowne, in line with that great commandment, "follow the money". All parties with a financial interest ought tto have a financial stake in the integrity of the game.

    Zac, the reason I say the union is weak, is two parts, first one is allowing Selig, a sitting owner, to become the commmissioner in the first place. That shifted the job description away from "the good of the game", which tacitly concerns the intersts of the players to one of, "for the interests of the owners". There is no way a strong Union allows this power grab to happen.

    seeing how commissioners have always been voted in by the owners

    and only the owners

    I don't see having an soon 2 B former owner as a much of a difference

     

     

    The second reason is the real money in baseball is not made through tickets and TV deals, although there is a ton coming from there, the real money comes from franchise appreciation. Recent sales of the Cubs, Rangers, Dodgers and Astros are off the charts. Two of these franchises sold due to poor business acumen in the owner's other businesses, (Cubs and Rangers), the Dodgers were dumped due to McCourt's divorce, and the 'Stros were sold after the owner decided to retire. All were sold with tremendous appreciation. There was never any risk of the owner not "making" it, plus the other owners can reject any offer to purchase a team, which allows them the ability to set the value of the available franchise, and artificially inflate the value of their own. Until the players negotiate a place at the table in franchise sales, they will in my mind be weak. After all, the union could blacklist a franchise and tell players not to sign there, thereby decreasing the incentive to purchase a team.

    let me just say I tend to lean towards management / owners more often than not

    so rather than turn this into a political debate

    let me ask you again

    is this really enough to call it a 'weak union'

    how many unions have what you suggest they should have above

    in the sports world ?

    in the entertainment industry ?

     

     

    I also think this from your OP is a tad unfair

    only under pressure from Congress did Selig began to address cheating and illegal activity in his business

    baseball instituted a minor league steroids policy in 2001

    which is all the union would allow at that time

    as far as I know congress didn't step in until  02

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Bud Selig to retire

    WHY NOW ?



    I like bud more than most

    but why the arod appeal now and not after the PO

    seems kind of stupid bud

     

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