Carp a quirk in stats

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Carp a quirk in stats

    Here is a RS  guy who has yet to feel the wrath of RS fans. It seems he always comes thru. However I am shocked some who hated the signing have not picked up that he has a 320 ave which is his best in baseball to date.

    What the haters have not mentioned is his 32 Ks in 103 ABs.

    Probably for the 33 hits, 9 BB, 25 RBI and 8 HRs

    If he gets 300 ABs he could end up with 96Ks, 99 Hits, 27 BBs, 75 RBIs and 24 HRs.

    I guess what I'm saying is that Ks seem to only matter you want them to support your theory when a guy is down.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:

     

    Here is a RS  guy who has yet to feel the wrath of RS fans. It seems he always comes thru. However I am shocked some who hated the signing have not picked up that he has a 320 ave which is his best in baseball to date.

    What the haters have not mentioned is his 32 Ks in 103 ABs.

    Probably for the 33 hits, 9 BB, 25 RBI and 8 HRs

    If he gets 300 ABs he could end up with 96Ks, 99 Hits, 27 BBs, 75 RBIs and 24 HRs.

    I guess what I'm saying is that Ks seem to only matter you want them to support your theory when a guy is down.

     




     

    And the rest of the story.  A tale of two Mike's.

                G      AB    H    HR    RBI     BB     SO     BA    OBP    SLG    OPS

    Napoli  66   244    64    9      49      28      93    .262    .347     .467      .814

    Carp     40    100   32    7      23       8       32    .320    .367     .660     1.027

    For his at-bats, Carp strikes out 32% and Napoli 38%.  The  RBI percentage for at-bats is similiar as well.  But just look at the BA, OBP, SLG, and OPS comparisons. 

    I'm not trying to kick a guy when he's down, and I will admit that Napoli's play  has been admirable, but would it not seem appropriate at the very least to platoon Napoli against lefties and Carp against righties while his bat remains hot?  And as an addendum, I think Carp has the better glove at 1B.

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:

     

    Here is a RS  guy who has yet to feel the wrath of RS fans. It seems he always comes thru. However I am shocked some who hated the signing have not picked up that he has a 320 ave which is his best in baseball to date.

    What the haters have not mentioned is his 32 Ks in 103 ABs.

    Probably for the 33 hits, 9 BB, 25 RBI and 8 HRs

    If he gets 300 ABs he could end up with 96Ks, 99 Hits, 27 BBs, 75 RBIs and 24 HRs.

    I guess what I'm saying is that Ks seem to only matter you want them to support your theory when a guy is down.

     




     

    And the rest of the story.  A tale of two Mike's.

                    G      AB    H    HR    RBI     BB     SO     BA      OBP      SLG      OPS

    Napoli     66   244   64    9      49      28      93    .262    .347     .467      .814

    Carp       40    100    32    7      23       8       32    .320    .367     .660     1.027

    For his at-bats, Carp strikes out 32% and Napoli 38%.  The  RBI percentage for at-bats is similiar as well.  But just look at the BA, OBP, SLG, and OPS comparisons. 

    I'm not trying to kick a guy when he's down, and I will admit that Napoli's play  has been admirable, but would it not seem appropriate at the very least to platoon Napoli against lefties and Carp against righties while his bat remains hot?  And as an addendum, I think Carp has the better glove at 1B.

     

     



    I concur

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:

     

    Here is a RS  guy who has yet to feel the wrath of RS fans. It seems he always comes thru. However I am shocked some who hated the signing have not picked up that he has a 320 ave which is his best in baseball to date.

    What the haters have not mentioned is his 32 Ks in 103 ABs.

    Probably for the 33 hits, 9 BB, 25 RBI and 8 HRs

    If he gets 300 ABs he could end up with 96Ks, 99 Hits, 27 BBs, 75 RBIs and 24 HRs.

    I guess what I'm saying is that Ks seem to only matter you want them to support your theory when a guy is down.

     




     

    And the rest of the story.  A tale of two Mike's.

                    G      AB    H    HR    RBI     BB     SO     BA      OBP      SLG      OPS

    Napoli     66   244   64    9      49      28      93    .262    .347     .467      .814

    Carp       40    100    32    7      23       8       32    .320    .367     .660     1.027

    For his at-bats, Carp strikes out 32% and Napoli 38%.  The  RBI percentage for at-bats is similiar as well.  But just look at the BA, OBP, SLG, and OPS comparisons. 

    I'm not trying to kick a guy when he's down, and I will admit that Napoli's play  has been admirable, but would it not seem appropriate at the very least to platoon Napoli against lefties and Carp against righties while his bat remains hot?  And as an addendum, I think Carp has the better glove at 1B.

     

     

     



    I concur

     



    Hey Jim, my being the obsessive/compusive type when my stat sheet appears scrambled, you must give me time to reformat to get the lines straight before you jump in and concur. :):):)  Thanks for your support.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    I've always thought K's were over-rated. Yeah, moving the runner over a handful or two more times over a season is nice, but as long as you are getting on base or knocking in runs, I could care less about K's.

    Sox4ever

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In fact, K's are often misanalyzed, like they are in this thread.

    Yes, Napoli is striking out more often. But strikeouts that are a result of working the count and seeing more pitches and drawing more walks are not such a bad thing.  Napoli has been walking 10.1% of the time, as opposed to Carp and his 8%. For his career, Napoli has always struck out alot (26%) as a result of working pitchers and walking alot (11.7%).

     

    Napoli has been making the pitcher throw 4.45 pitches per plate appearance, while Carp is seeing 3.94.  Who cares about striking out more often if he is making pitchers work harder and drawing more walks?

     

     

    “Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me. Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”

    -Shel Silverstein

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ctredsoxfanhugh. Show ctredsoxfanhugh's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    K is just an out. Power and hit tool can even out a lot of strikeouts.  If a guy has a high ops I could care less how he gets out.

    How many 150 K guys also walk a ton and jack out 40?

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to ctredsoxfanhugh's comment:

    K is just an out. Power and hit tool can even out a lot of strikeouts.  If a guy has a high ops I could care less how he gets out.

    How many 150 K guys also walk a ton and jack out 40?




    That describes Mark Reynolds perfectly. Although I dont think his BA and OBP are high, his SLG is. Not sure on his BB%

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to notin's comment:

    In fact, K's are often misanalyzed, like they are in this thread.

    Yes, Napoli is striking out more often. But strikeouts that are a result of working the count and seeing more pitches and drawing more walks are not such a bad thing.  Napoli has been walking 10.1% of the time, as opposed to Carp and his 8%. For his career, Napoli has always struck out alot (26%) as a result of working pitchers and walking alot (11.7%).

     

    Napoli has been making the pitcher throw 4.45 pitches per plate appearance, while Carp is seeing 3.94.  Who cares about striking out more often if he is making pitchers work harder and drawing more walks?

     

     

    “Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me. Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”

    -Shel Silverstein



    You've made a good point Notin, but doesn't it concern you just a bit that his SO rate has increased from you're previously mentioned 26% to 38% at present. 

    There may be a limit to the advantage of working the opposing pitchers to increase their pitch count by sacrificing productivity, namely putting the ball in play.  And as an addendum, with some opposing pitchers you're only going to see them up to the 5th inning anyways because the Sox hitters will have caught up with them by then.  Other opposing pitchers, and I refer to the Halladay, Verlander, Pettitte types who are going to go deep into the game one way or another, are not that susceptible to those hitters trying to go deep into the count before ultimately striking out because in general they keep throwing strikes.

    Respectfully, I still support, 'see the ball, hit the ball'. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

    In response to ctredsoxfanhugh's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    K is just an out. Power and hit tool can even out a lot of strikeouts.  If a guy has a high ops I could care less how he gets out.

    How many 150 K guys also walk a ton and jack out 40?

     




    That describes Mark Reynolds perfectly. Although I dont think his BA and OBP are high, his SLG is. Not sure on his BB%

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Maybe Adam Dunn is the better example.

     

    Career 28.3% K rate and 35.7, 34.2 and 31.6 the last 3 years, but always a high OBP

    4.27 pitches/PA, but 4.38, 4.43, and 4.38 the last 3 years.

    .367 career OBP (but much lower since coming to the AL 3 years ago)

    .865 career OPS (.707 with the CWS)

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    In response to notin's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In fact, K's are often misanalyzed, like they are in this thread.

    Yes, Napoli is striking out more often. But strikeouts that are a result of working the count and seeing more pitches and drawing more walks are not such a bad thing.  Napoli has been walking 10.1% of the time, as opposed to Carp and his 8%. For his career, Napoli has always struck out alot (26%) as a result of working pitchers and walking alot (11.7%).

     

    Napoli has been making the pitcher throw 4.45 pitches per plate appearance, while Carp is seeing 3.94.  Who cares about striking out more often if he is making pitchers work harder and drawing more walks?

     

     

    “Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me. Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”

    -Shel Silverstein

     



    You've made a good point Notin, but doesn't it concern you just a bit that his SO rate has increased from you're previously mentioned 26% to 38% at present. 

     

    There may be a limit to the advantage of working the opposing pitchers to increase their pitch count by sacrificing productivity, namely putting the ball in play.  And as an addendum, with some opposing pitchers you're only going to see them up to the 5th inning anyways because the Sox hitters will have caught up with them by then.  Other opposing pitchers, and I refer to the Halladay, Verlander, Pettitte types who are going to go deep into the game one way or another, are not that susceptible to those hitters trying to go deep into the count before ultimately striking out because in general they keep throwing strikes.

    Respectfully, I still support, 'see the ball, hit the ball'. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Most pitchers are limited by pitch counts. The more batter you have going deep in counts, the sooner you face those middle releievers, who are usually a team's worst pitchers.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Carp a quirk in stats

    In response to moonslav59's comment:

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to ctredsoxfanhugh's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    K is just an out. Power and hit tool can even out a lot of strikeouts.  If a guy has a high ops I could care less how he gets out.

    How many 150 K guys also walk a ton and jack out 40?

     

     




    That describes Mark Reynolds perfectly. Although I dont think his BA and OBP are high, his SLG is. Not sure on his BB%

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Maybe Adam Dunn is the better example.

     

     

    Career 28.3% K rate and 35.7, 34.2 and 31.6 the last 3 years, but always a high OBP

    4.27 pitches/PA, but 4.38, 4.43, and 4.38 the last 3 years.

    .367 career OBP (but much lower since coming to the AL 3 years ago)

    .865 career OPS (.707 with the CWS)

    [/QUOTE]


    Good example Moon. Reynolds was just the 1st name to pop in my head without doing any research and not knowing the actual stats...

     

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