Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  Walkoff single in G5.  Including the last game of the ALDS, over a span of 6 postseason games the Red Sox had 3 wins, and they all came on walkoff hits by Ortiz.  He also had a key HR in the 8th inning of G5 and another in the 1st inning of G7.  For the 2004 postseason, Ortiz hit a mind-boggling 400/515/764 with 5 HR and 19 RBI in 14 games.

    2 Joe Torre crucial error in G5.  The Yankees led 4-2 going to the bottom of the 8th inning.  Torre opted to open the inning with Tom Gordon instead of Rivera.  Rivera had thrown 2 innings and 40 pitches in G4 and Torre didnt want to ask him to do it 2 games in a row.  But Gordon gave up a home run, a walk and a single without retiring a batter.  Then Torre brought in Rivera.  Rivera allowed a game-tying sac fly, then closed out the rest of the inning, and the 9th inning as well, with no further damage.  So yes, he ended up throwing the 2 innings anyway.  Thanks always, Joe.

    3 Curt Schilling G6.  The Bloody Sock has come to overshadow Schillings performance.  But even if you leave out the Sock and the strange saga of how Dr. Bill Morgan was able to get him out on the field, it was a masterful clutch performance at the most crucial time.  7 innings of 1-run ball on a cold miserable night in Yankee Stadium, in front of 50,000 Yankee fans there to see the Red Sox comeback and the hopes of their fans crash and burn one more time.

    4 Umpiring crew G6.  I still cant believe this.  First they correctly reversed the original call on Bellhorns HR which was called a double at first.  That was a one run turnaround.  Then, even more incredibly, they correctly reversed the original call on the A-Rod slap play, with 50,000 fans booing and throwing stuff on the field.  That was at least a one run turnaround.  Both reversals were based solely on the umpires assembling and discussing what they had seen-no replays.

    5 Yankee bats silenced after G3.  In G3 the Yankees were a wrecking machine, hitting scorching line drive after towering bomb en route to a merciless 19-run barrage that left the Red Sox staff in shreds.  Then, magically, in G4-7, the Red Sox pitching was suddenly stellar and the Yankee big bats, A-Rod, Sheffield, and Matsui, were virtually shut down.  How can you explain such things?  How can a pitcher like Curtis Leskanic record 4 straight outs in the extra innings of G4 after giving up 3 runs and getting only one out in G3?  Those 4 outs, by the way, were the last pitches of Leskanics career.

    6 Keith Foulke G4-6.  Foulke somehow managed to throw 5 scoreless innings and 100 pitches in 3 nights.  He was truly running on fumes by the time Tony Clark swung and missed the final pitch of G6. One of Franconas greatest moves was using Foulke to get 8 outs in G4 while the Red Sox were still trailing by a run.  Foulke went on to a lights-out World Series.  Unfortunately, it appears he paid the price for his magnificent postseason with the health of his arm.

    7 Derek Lowe G4, G7.  Here is a pitcher coming off a truly awful season, so bad that he was pushed out of the postseason rotation and only the G4 starter because of the dire condition of the staff.  Lowe turns in a clutch performance in G4, then another in G7.  He ends up as the winning pitcher in the deciding games of all 3 postseason series for the Sox.  And then, of course, is cut loose by the team.  It's a strange game.

    8 Tony Clark ground-rule double in 9th inning of G5.  Often pointed to as the moment that made many people think the baseball gods were on the Sox side for once.  If Clarks ball doesnt hop the fence, Sierra scores, and Rivera probably closes things out for a 5-4 Yankee win and the end of the series.

    9 Francona near-critical error in G5.  Cant let you off the hook on this one, Terry.  In the top of the 6th inning the Yankees took a 4-2 lead on Jeters 2-out, bases-loaded double off Pedro.  It was a dagger, another big blow by Captain Clutch.  Following that, Pedro hit A-Rod and walked Sheffield to re-load the bases.  Up steps Matsui, who to this point in the series already has a ridiculous 12 hits and 10 RBI.  This would be the correct time to pull Pedro, who is clearly at the end of his rope, having reached 107 pitches.  Surely Tito remembers the lessons of 2003 ALCS G7 when Pedro was left in too long.  Surely he knows the stats on how Pedro loses effectiveness at 105 pitches and will not let him face the smoking-hot Matsui.  Well, actually, no.  Tito leaves Pedro in, and on a 2-1 pitch Matsui hits a deadly-looking sinking liner to right field.  Miraculously, Trot Nixon, whose misplay on a Jeter fly ball in that same 2003 ALCS G7 contributed to the Yankee rally, runs in and makes a fine catch to keep the score at 4-2.     

    10 Tim Wakefield G5.  Tim Wakefield somehow threw 3 scoreless innings, the 12th, 13th and 14th, and became the winning pitcher.  All this with Varitek catching him instead of his usual catcher Mirabelli.  The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning.  You can't make this stuff up.

    Yes, I know, I'm leaving out things like the Roberts steal and Damons HRs.  Others would likely have much different lists.  That's how much stuff happened in that one incredible series.   

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    1-Not strictly the ALCS, but Lowe went 0-3 in 2003, and 3-0 in 2004.  Will any pitcher ever win the clinching game 3x in a row?

    2-Damon goes 3-29 with 1 RBI in 6 games, and has 6 RBIs in 2 ABs.

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

     

    I paid a scalper $300 to sit in the upper deck for game 7.  In the 7th inning, several Red Sox fans and I began chanting, "WHO'S YOUR DEALER?!?" to Sheffield when he came up to bat.   LOL

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  [/QUOTE] Joe Buck....we'll see you later tonight..


     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    Nice OP, Halifax.  I went to work the night of game 3 so dejected ... and yet the next night, watching THE SB, things started to swing.   I couldn't finish game 5, had to go to work, but a little later a co-worker (a Phillies fan) came in and asked me if I knew what was happening ... things seemed electric for the next several days.

     

     

     
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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnchiladaT. Show EnchiladaT's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    Trot Nixon!  Nearly unstoppable against the Yankees.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Ice-Cream's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    I paid a scalper $300 to sit in the upper deck for game 7.  In the 7th inning, several Red Sox fans and I began chanting, "WHO'S YOUR DEALER?!?" to Sheffield when he came up to bat.   LOL

    [/QUOTE]


    Wow. What a bargain.

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to jete02fan's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  [/QUOTE] Joe Buck....we'll see you later tonight..


    [/QUOTE]

    Yes. lol And that's what amazes me. I can remember practically everything Joe Buck said during the last four games. Of course, I've watched them 1,000 times.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    The one thing that amazes me is that a walk and a steal are remembered so much more than a shot up the middle that brought him home. I guess it's not that amazing since the walk was the beginning and the steal was so crucial, but if it wasn't for the hit, he wasn't coming home. And in reality, the hit was probably the hardest thing to do in that situation with so much pressure on.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnchiladaT. Show EnchiladaT's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    he hides under your bed? i usually find him hiding behind my curtain

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    You've already said you're worried about Pike hurting you, I think you need to shut down your computer. Especially when you're in incoherent mode.

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnchiladaT. Show EnchiladaT's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    nice try kim. 

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Since then, they won another World Series in 2007 after their "incompetent" GM and his staff reconstructed the team.  I would also posit that they were a healthy Beckett away from another World Series appearance in 2008.  And while the mercurial Beckett never had a bloody sock moment, he was clearly an Ace who delivered as such in 2007.

    You make such a lousy case for a lawyer.  

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    You've already said you're worried about Pike hurting you, I think you need to shut down your computer. Especially when you're in incoherent mode.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Sounded as if he were trying to woo you, Kimster.  Are you playing hard to get?  

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    You've already said you're worried about Pike hurting you, I think you need to shut down your computer. Especially when you're in incoherent mode.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Sounded as if he were trying to woo you, Kimster.  Are you playing hard to get?  

    [/QUOTE]

    No; according to Chimichanga or whatever he calls himself these days, that's me.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  Walkoff single in G5.  Including the last game of the ALDS, over a span of 6 postseason games the Red Sox had 3 wins, and they all came on walkoff hits by Ortiz.  He also had a key HR in the 8th inning of G5 and another in the 1st inning of G7.  For the 2004 postseason, Ortiz hit a mind-boggling 400/515/764 with 5 HR and 19 RBI in 14 games.

    2 Joe Torre crucial error in G5.  The Yankees led 4-2 going to the bottom of the 8th inning.  Torre opted to open the inning with Tom Gordon instead of Rivera.  Rivera had thrown 2 innings and 40 pitches in G4 and Torre didnt want to ask him to do it 2 games in a row.  But Gordon gave up a home run, a walk and a single without retiring a batter.  Then Torre brought in Rivera.  Rivera allowed a game-tying sac fly, then closed out the rest of the inning, and the 9th inning as well, with no further damage.  So yes, he ended up throwing the 2 innings anyway.  Thanks always, Joe.

    3 Curt Schilling G6.  The Bloody Sock has come to overshadow Schillings performance.  But even if you leave out the Sock and the strange saga of how Dr. Bill Morgan was able to get him out on the field, it was a masterful clutch performance at the most crucial time.  7 innings of 1-run ball on a cold miserable night in Yankee Stadium, in front of 50,000 Yankee fans there to see the Red Sox comeback and the hopes of their fans crash and burn one more time.

    4 Umpiring crew G6.  I still cant believe this.  First they correctly reversed the original call on Bellhorns HR which was called a double at first.  That was a one run turnaround.  Then, even more incredibly, they correctly reversed the original call on the A-Rod slap play, with 50,000 fans booing and throwing stuff on the field.  That was at least a one run turnaround.  Both reversals were based solely on the umpires assembling and discussing what they had seen-no replays.

    5 Yankee bats silenced after G3.  In G3 the Yankees were a wrecking machine, hitting scorching line drive after towering bomb en route to a merciless 19-run barrage that left the Red Sox staff in shreds.  Then, magically, in G4-7, the Red Sox pitching was suddenly stellar and the Yankee big bats, A-Rod, Sheffield, and Matsui, were virtually shut down.  How can you explain such things?  How can a pitcher like Curtis Leskanic record 4 straight outs in the extra innings of G4 after giving up 3 runs and getting only one out in G3?  Those 4 outs, by the way, were the last pitches of Leskanics career.

    6 Keith Foulke G4-6.  Foulke somehow managed to throw 5 scoreless innings and 100 pitches in 3 nights.  He was truly running on fumes by the time Tony Clark swung and missed the final pitch of G6. One of Franconas greatest moves was using Foulke to get 8 outs in G4 while the Red Sox were still trailing by a run.  Foulke went on to a lights-out World Series.  Unfortunately, it appears he paid the price for his magnificent postseason with the health of his arm.

    7 Derek Lowe G4, G7.  Here is a pitcher coming off a truly awful season, so bad that he was pushed out of the postseason rotation and only the G4 starter because of the dire condition of the staff.  Lowe turns in a clutch performance in G4, then another in G7.  He ends up as the winning pitcher in the deciding games of all 3 postseason series for the Sox.  And then, of course, is cut loose by the team.  It's a strange game.

    8 Tony Clark ground-rule double in 9th inning of G5.  Often pointed to as the moment that made many people think the baseball gods were on the Sox side for once.  If Clarks ball doesnt hop the fence, Sierra scores, and Rivera probably closes things out for a 5-4 Yankee win and the end of the series.

    9 Francona near-critical error in G5.  Cant let you off the hook on this one, Terry.  In the top of the 6th inning the Yankees took a 4-2 lead on Jeters 2-out, bases-loaded double off Pedro.  It was a dagger, another big blow by Captain Clutch.  Following that, Pedro hit A-Rod and walked Sheffield to re-load the bases.  Up steps Matsui, who to this point in the series already has a ridiculous 12 hits and 10 RBI.  This would be the correct time to pull Pedro, who is clearly at the end of his rope, having reached 107 pitches.  Surely Tito remembers the lessons of 2003 ALCS G7 when Pedro was left in too long.  Surely he knows the stats on how Pedro loses effectiveness at 105 pitches and will not let him face the smoking-hot Matsui.  Well, actually, no.  Tito leaves Pedro in, and on a 2-1 pitch Matsui hits a deadly-looking sinking liner to right field.  Miraculously, Trot Nixon, whose misplay on a Jeter fly ball in that same 2003 ALCS G7 contributed to the Yankee rally, runs in and makes a fine catch to keep the score at 4-2.     

    10 Tim Wakefield G5.  Tim Wakefield somehow threw 3 scoreless innings, the 12th, 13th and 14th, and became the winning pitcher.  All this with Varitek catching him instead of his usual catcher Mirabelli.  The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning.  You can't make this stuff up.

    Yes, I know, I'm leaving out things like the Roberts steal and Damons HRs.  Others would likely have much different lists.  That's how much stuff happened in that one incredible series.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Nixon's catch of Matsui's bases loaded liner in G5.

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to nhsteven's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  Walkoff single in G5.  Including the last game of the ALDS, over a span of 6 postseason games the Red Sox had 3 wins, and they all came on walkoff hits by Ortiz.  He also had a key HR in the 8th inning of G5 and another in the 1st inning of G7.  For the 2004 postseason, Ortiz hit a mind-boggling 400/515/764 with 5 HR and 19 RBI in 14 games.

    2 Joe Torre crucial error in G5.  The Yankees led 4-2 going to the bottom of the 8th inning.  Torre opted to open the inning with Tom Gordon instead of Rivera.  Rivera had thrown 2 innings and 40 pitches in G4 and Torre didnt want to ask him to do it 2 games in a row.  But Gordon gave up a home run, a walk and a single without retiring a batter.  Then Torre brought in Rivera.  Rivera allowed a game-tying sac fly, then closed out the rest of the inning, and the 9th inning as well, with no further damage.  So yes, he ended up throwing the 2 innings anyway.  Thanks always, Joe.

    3 Curt Schilling G6.  The Bloody Sock has come to overshadow Schillings performance.  But even if you leave out the Sock and the strange saga of how Dr. Bill Morgan was able to get him out on the field, it was a masterful clutch performance at the most crucial time.  7 innings of 1-run ball on a cold miserable night in Yankee Stadium, in front of 50,000 Yankee fans there to see the Red Sox comeback and the hopes of their fans crash and burn one more time.

    4 Umpiring crew G6.  I still cant believe this.  First they correctly reversed the original call on Bellhorns HR which was called a double at first.  That was a one run turnaround.  Then, even more incredibly, they correctly reversed the original call on the A-Rod slap play, with 50,000 fans booing and throwing stuff on the field.  That was at least a one run turnaround.  Both reversals were based solely on the umpires assembling and discussing what they had seen-no replays.

    5 Yankee bats silenced after G3.  In G3 the Yankees were a wrecking machine, hitting scorching line drive after towering bomb en route to a merciless 19-run barrage that left the Red Sox staff in shreds.  Then, magically, in G4-7, the Red Sox pitching was suddenly stellar and the Yankee big bats, A-Rod, Sheffield, and Matsui, were virtually shut down.  How can you explain such things?  How can a pitcher like Curtis Leskanic record 4 straight outs in the extra innings of G4 after giving up 3 runs and getting only one out in G3?  Those 4 outs, by the way, were the last pitches of Leskanics career.

    6 Keith Foulke G4-6.  Foulke somehow managed to throw 5 scoreless innings and 100 pitches in 3 nights.  He was truly running on fumes by the time Tony Clark swung and missed the final pitch of G6. One of Franconas greatest moves was using Foulke to get 8 outs in G4 while the Red Sox were still trailing by a run.  Foulke went on to a lights-out World Series.  Unfortunately, it appears he paid the price for his magnificent postseason with the health of his arm.

    7 Derek Lowe G4, G7.  Here is a pitcher coming off a truly awful season, so bad that he was pushed out of the postseason rotation and only the G4 starter because of the dire condition of the staff.  Lowe turns in a clutch performance in G4, then another in G7.  He ends up as the winning pitcher in the deciding games of all 3 postseason series for the Sox.  And then, of course, is cut loose by the team.  It's a strange game.

    8 Tony Clark ground-rule double in 9th inning of G5.  Often pointed to as the moment that made many people think the baseball gods were on the Sox side for once.  If Clarks ball doesnt hop the fence, Sierra scores, and Rivera probably closes things out for a 5-4 Yankee win and the end of the series.

    9 Francona near-critical error in G5.  Cant let you off the hook on this one, Terry.  In the top of the 6th inning the Yankees took a 4-2 lead on Jeters 2-out, bases-loaded double off Pedro.  It was a dagger, another big blow by Captain Clutch.  Following that, Pedro hit A-Rod and walked Sheffield to re-load the bases.  Up steps Matsui, who to this point in the series already has a ridiculous 12 hits and 10 RBI.  This would be the correct time to pull Pedro, who is clearly at the end of his rope, having reached 107 pitches.  Surely Tito remembers the lessons of 2003 ALCS G7 when Pedro was left in too long.  Surely he knows the stats on how Pedro loses effectiveness at 105 pitches and will not let him face the smoking-hot Matsui.  Well, actually, no.  Tito leaves Pedro in, and on a 2-1 pitch Matsui hits a deadly-looking sinking liner to right field.  Miraculously, Trot Nixon, whose misplay on a Jeter fly ball in that same 2003 ALCS G7 contributed to the Yankee rally, runs in and makes a fine catch to keep the score at 4-2.     

    10 Tim Wakefield G5.  Tim Wakefield somehow threw 3 scoreless innings, the 12th, 13th and 14th, and became the winning pitcher.  All this with Varitek catching him instead of his usual catcher Mirabelli.  The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning.  You can't make this stuff up.

    Yes, I know, I'm leaving out things like the Roberts steal and Damons HRs.  Others would likely have much different lists.  That's how much stuff happened in that one incredible series.   

    [/QUOTE]

    Nixon's catch of Matsui's bases loaded liner in G5.

    [/QUOTE]


    Thats under number 9 at the very end.

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    My bad

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

    I would agree that the Red Sox pen was deeper that season, and even though Foulke matched and even outpitched the great Mo in that series, it would be blasphemy for a Yankee fan (and any baseball fan for that matter) to suggest that anybody was a better closer.  Also, if you look at the stats, Tom Gordon had a great season (.221 ERA, .881 WHIP).  He just didn't get the job done against the Red Sox and put a lot of stress on Mo and the rest of the pen, leading to their ultimate collapse later in the series.  

    The biggest difference was the rotation.  A tired-armed Kevin Brown, Jon Lieber, an aging Moose,  El Duque, and a useless Javier Vazquez (giggle, giggle) vs. Schill (when stapled shut, ankle that is), Daddy Petey, a resurgent Derek Lowe, and a satisfactory Bronson Arroyo.  Most of it didn't come into play until Game 6, but with Schill vs. Lieber and Lowe vs. Brown (at that point), the Yankees were clearly outmatched.

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    You've already said you're worried about Pike hurting you, I think you need to shut down your computer. Especially when you're in incoherent mode.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Sounded as if he were trying to woo you, Kimster.  Are you playing hard to get?  

    [/QUOTE]

    More like impossible to get. This guy thinks he's the "spokesman" for the board. Kinda like my dad called Johnny when he went to the Yankees.

     

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