Jeter retiring

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    Hard to believe he is retiring. It will be weird not seeing him as part of the Yankees. I was chatting with my son this morning about it and realized that in his lifetime there's barely been a time when Jeter was not the face of the Yankees.

    He is an excellent representative of MLB and he will sail into the HOF with no problem.

     
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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from prknsdnld. Show prknsdnld's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
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      Jeter will hit this year like he always has. He's going out the way Phil Rizzuto did (look that up, people)......

    [/QUOTE]

    Look who's back! My old friend prknsdnld. Thought you retired from the board when Beni was booted.

    [/QUOTE]

    No, Kim, I always had a soft spot for you (in spite of our irreconcilible differences ) and am glad-as you are- that we are both still alive and well. Happy Valentine's day to you. I wish I could celebrate it with you with flowers and champagne, but I'm sure that slot is filled.  Now let the games begin !!!

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    two decades all for ONE team, 5 time champ...truth be told..it's time...thank you Captain Jetes...

    [/QUOTE]

    I'll agree, Jete. It was a good run. Never wanted to see him up, especially since he took so long getting in and out of the box for every pitch. Tongue OutWink

    [/QUOTE] well, like i told 4B's, MLB will regret that they nixed my suggestion of electrified batter's boxes :-)


     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to JoseLaguna's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
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      Jeter will hit this year like he always has. He's going out the way Phil Rizzuto did (look that up, people)......

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Look who's back! My old friend prknsdnld. Thought you retired from the board when Beni was booted.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL, no villain, no fun.

    [/QUOTE]

    I like to think I'm still a Beni-like villian. :)

    [/QUOTE] don't do it Kim, writing Yankee manifestos and rallying the inmates at Gitmo is a full time job...it sent Beni into early retirement Tongue Out
     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from prknsdnld. Show prknsdnld's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to JoseLaguna's comment:
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    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
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      Jeter will hit this year like he always has. He's going out the way Phil Rizzuto did (look that up, people)......

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Look who's back! My old friend prknsdnld. Thought you retired from the board when Beni was booted.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL, no villain, no fun.

    [/QUOTE]

    I like to think I'm still a Beni-like villian. :)

    [/QUOTE] don't do it Kim, writing Yankee manifestos and rallying the inmates at Gitmo is a full time job...it sent Beni into early retirement Tongue Out
     

    Let Smiley- Beni be the martyr they all want him to be.........

    [/QUOTE

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    two decades all for ONE team, 5 time champ...truth be told..it's time...thank you Captain Jetes...

    [/QUOTE]

    I'll agree, Jete. It was a good run. Never wanted to see him up, especially since he took so long getting in and out of the box for every pitch. Tongue OutWink

    [/QUOTE] well, like i told 4B's, MLB will regret that they nixed my suggestion of electrified batter's boxes :-)


    [/QUOTE]
    I'm ashamed of myself.  I literally LOL the first time I read that, and then you just got me again!  Laughing

    Dig out those jammie's fella... we'll be back at it before you know it now!

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to S5's comment:
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    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    two decades all for ONE team, 5 time champ...truth be told..it's time...thank you Captain Jetes...

    [/QUOTE]

    I'll agree, Jete. It was a good run. Never wanted to see him up, especially since he took so long getting in and out of the box for every pitch. Tongue OutWink

    [/QUOTE] well, like i told 4B's, MLB will regret that they nixed my suggestion of electrified batter's boxes :-)


    [/QUOTE]
    I'm ashamed of myself.  I literally LOL the first time I read that, and then you just got me again!  Laughing

    Dig out those jammie's fella... we'll be back at it before you know it now!

    [/QUOTE] with the week of weather we're having..please don't use that word around me Tongue OutWink....besides i'll probably have more luck finding those than my car every damn morning :-)


     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    from NYT.com

     

     

    Baseball Derek Jeter Lived a Dream, and Never Disappointed

     

      Derek Jeter in 2008 after breaking Lou Gehrig’s mark with his 1,270th hit at Yankee Stadium. Barton Silverman/The New York Times the greatest compliment we can give Derek Jeter, as he prepares to leave the grandest stage in baseball, is that he never let us down. He has made thousands of outs and hundreds of errors and finished most of his seasons without a championship. Yet he never disappointed us.

    This is no small feat for the modern athlete, in an age of endless traps and temptations.

    From cheating to preening to taunting — even to defensible acts, like fleeing to a new team in free agency — the hero, almost invariably, breaks our heart sometime. Not Jeter.

    He grew up beside a baseball diamond in Kalamazoo, Mich., dreaming of playing shortstop for the Yankees, and that is what he has done. He has never played another position, never been anything but No. 2 for the Yankees. But this season, he announced Wednesday, will be his last.

                            “The one thing I always said to myself was that when baseball started to feel more like a job, it would be time to move forward,” Jeter said in a statement on Facebook, adding later: “I could not be more sure. I know it in my heart. The 2014 season will be my last year playing professional baseball.”

    When Jeter played his first game at the old Yankee Stadium, on June 2, 1995, the announced crowd was 16,959. By 2008, when he closed the ballpark with a speech to the fans, the average attendance topped 53,000. For the Yankees, Jeter was the right player at the right time, a model of stability and the embodiment of their ideals.

    Jeter has compiled 3,316 hits (10th on baseball’s career list), winning five championships while making more than $250 million in salary. But his impact has always been greater than his numbers.

    When Jeter joined the organization, as a high schooler drafted sixth over all in 1992, the Yankees were enduring their fourth consecutive losing season, driven to disarray by the principal owner, George Steinbrenner, who was suspended at the time. Jeter would become a centerpiece of the Yankees’ rebuilding, and the team has had only winning records since, building a new stadium and launching a lucrative cable network in the process.

     

    Jeter has had plenty of help, from homegrown stars like Bernie Williams and Jorge Posada to pricey imports like Mark Teixeira and C. C. Sabathia. But Jeter, the captain, has always been out front. When injuries limited him to 17 games last season, the Yankees lost attendance and ratings and fell in the standings.

    “I’ve gone to Yankees games and I’ve asked kids outside the park, ‘Who are you going to go see?’ ” said Dick Groch, the scout who signed Jeter. “Nine out of 10 kids say, ‘Derek Jeter.’

    “What a marquee player.”

    Groch, who now works for the Milwaukee Brewers, continued: “Remember that word: marquee. Babe Ruth was marquee. The money Ruth brought to the Yankees was unbelievable, and Derek Jeter’s done the same thing. You could look at tons of statistics, but they’ll never show you that.”

    Jeter is perhaps the most secure, self-confident player in baseball, a sharp contrast to the disgraced Alex Rodriguez, whose season-long suspension means that he will never again be teammates with Jeter. Groch said he noticed these traits while scouting Jeter, who smiled under pressure and showed the leadership skills of a chief executive.

    His skills stood out, too, of course, and the inside-out swing that would rifle so many hits to right field intrigued Groch. Sometimes, if a hitter punches too many balls the opposite way, it means he cannot catch up to the fastball. Groch asked the young Jeter if he or the pitcher was dictating the action.

    Jeter replied that it was his choice. He was using his ability to wait a split-second longer so he could react to more pitches. And when he got a letter-high fastball over the middle, Groch said, Jeter could still pull it over the left-field wall, the way he would for a pivotal homer in the 2000 World Series against the Mets, and for his 3,000th hit in 2011.

    By then, Jeter was so accomplished that it was easy to forget his initial struggles, his 56 errors in Class A in 1993. His defense, especially his lack of range, would remain a flash point deep into his career, with many believing he was vastly overrated in the field. But he made himself reliable enough to stay at shortstop, and in 1994 he was the consensus minor league player of the year. He was on his way.

    Jeter was the American League rookie of the year in 1996, when the Yankees won the World Series, and the glare never bothered him. He remains a bachelor who dates starlets, but his rules of engagement with the news media have worked because of his unrelenting consistency. He never answers questions about his personal life — ever — and so is rarely even asked.

    No superstar in sports is more accessible than Jeter, who is available by his locker before and after almost every game, mainly to take pressure off teammates. Group interviews can play out like jousting matches, which Jeter always wins. He cannot be baited into saying something that will linger as a story. He does not raise his voice, rarely shows irritation and never goes off the record.

    Jeter is often called boring, but that is not quite right. His reverence for Yankees history, and his place in it, is endearing. He insists on using a recording of the late Bob Sheppard, the public-address announcer whose career began the same day as Mickey Mantle’s, before his home at-bats.

    At the old Stadium, Jeter dressed next to the empty locker of another captain, Thurman Munson, who was killed in a plane crash in 1979. When Phil Rizzuto, his long-ago predecessor at shortstop, died in 2007, Jeter revealed that Rizzuto’s autograph was the only one in his collection.

    Jeter asked for just one artifact from the original Stadium: the overhead sign from the dugout runway with Joe DiMaggio’s famous quotation, thanking the Lord for making him a Yankee.

    In his retirement statement on Wednesday, Jeter began by saying thank you.

    By announcing his intention, Jeter all but ensures a farewell tour with gifts at each opposing ballpark, as Mariano Rivera experienced last season. Ceremony does not seem to be Jeter’s style, but he said he wanted to soak in his final moments, and who would deny him the privilege?

    Last week, Groch sent an email to Jeter’s agent, Casey Close, a former minor leaguer he also signed years ago. Groch asked Close to give his regards to Jeter and his family, and added a plea about the captain’s exit.

    “Don’t let him go out not playing shortstop,” Groch said he told Close. “Don’t let him go out playing left field or third base. Let him go out like Mo. Let him go out the way he deserves.”

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from soups. Show soups's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    The collective classiness of MLB will drop a few points.  Back to back class acts in Rivera and Jeter.  Couldn't ask for better reps of the game.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    Yanks P&C's today...finally!!!!!....everyone have a great weekend..Happy V-Day to the ladies of the board...hope you are treated well today(and everyday) Cool

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
    [QUOTE]

      Jeter will hit this year like he always has. He's going out the way Phil Rizzuto did (look that up, people)......

    [/QUOTE]

    Look who's back! My old friend prknsdnld. Thought you retired from the board when Beni was booted.

    [/QUOTE]

    No, Kim, I always had a soft spot for you (in spite of our irreconcilible differences ) and am glad-as you are- that we are both still alive and well. Happy Valentine's day to you. I wish I could celebrate it with you with flowers and champagne, but I'm sure that slot is filled.  Now let the games begin !!!

    [/QUOTE]

    Aww. That's so sweet coming from a Yankee fan. :) Happy belated Valentine's Day to you as well.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to jete02fan's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to JoseLaguna's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to prknsdnld's comment:
    [QUOTE]

      Jeter will hit this year like he always has. He's going out the way Phil Rizzuto did (look that up, people)......

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Look who's back! My old friend prknsdnld. Thought you retired from the board when Beni was booted.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL, no villain, no fun.

    [/QUOTE]

    I like to think I'm still a Beni-like villian. :)

    [/QUOTE] don't do it Kim, writing Yankee manifestos and rallying the inmates at Gitmo is a full time job...it sent Beni into early retirement Tongue Out
     

    [/QUOTE]

    No worries, Jete. I couldn't possibly duplicate the brilliant mind of Beni. I doubt he'll ever be replaced. However, I'm still right up their with Sox fans who irritate Yankee fans here by telling the truth. Tongue Out

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    Yanks P&C's today...finally!!!!!....everyone have a great weekend..Happy V-Day to the ladies of the board...hope you are treated well today(and everyday)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Happy belated Valentine's Day to you as well, Jete. :)

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    good thing he is retiring.  now he will have the time needed to cure cancer, end all wars, and feed all the hungry....

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

     

     

    I want to start by saying thank you.

    I know they say that when you dream you eventually wake up. Well, for some reason, I’ve never had to wake up. Not just because of my time as a New York Yankee but also because I am living my dream every single day.

    Last year was a tough one for me. As I suffered through a bunch of injuries, I realized that some of the things that always came easily to me and were always fun had started to become a struggle. The one thing I always said to myself was that when baseball started to feel more like a job, it would be time to move forward.

    So really it was months ago when I realized that this season would likely be my last. As I came to this conclusion and shared it with my friends and family, they all told me to hold off saying anything until I was absolutely 100% sure.

    And the thing is, I could not be more sure. I know it in my heart. The 2014 season will be my last year playing professional baseball.

    I’ve experienced so many defining moments in my career. Winning the World Series as a rookie shortstop, being named the Yankees captain, closing the old and opening the new Yankee Stadium. Through it all, I’ve never stopped chasing the next one. I want to finally stop the chase and take in the world.

    For the last 20 years I’ve been completely focused on two goals: playing my best and helping the Yankees win. That means that for 365 days a year, my every thought and action were geared toward that goal. It’s now time for something new.

    From the time I was a kid, my dream was always very vivid and it never changed: I was going to be the shortstop for the NY Yankees. It started as an empty canvas more than 20 years ago, and now that I look at it, it’s almost complete. In a million years, I wouldn’t have believed just how beautiful it would become.

    So many people have traveled along this journey with me and helped me along the way: I want to especially thank The Boss, the Steinbrenner family, the entire Yankees organization, my managers, my coaches, my teammates, my friends and of course, above all, my family. They taught me incredible life lessons and are the #1 reason I lasted this long. They may not have been on the field, but they feel they played every game with me, and I think they are ready to call it a career as well.

    I also couldn’t have done it without the people of New York. NY fans always pushed me to be my best. They have embraced me, loved me, respected me and have ALWAYS been there for me. This can be a tough, invasive, critical and demanding environment. The people of this city have high expectations and are anxious to see them met.

    But it’s those same people who have challenged me, cheered for me, beat me down and picked me back up all at the same time. NY made me stronger, kept me more focused and made me a better, more well-rounded person. For that I will be forever grateful. I never could have imagined playing anywhere else.

    I will remember it all: the cheers, the boos, every win, every loss, all the plane trips, the bus rides, the clubhouses, the walks through the tunnel and every drive to and from the Bronx. I have achieved almost every personal and professional goal I have set. I have gotten the very most out of my life playing baseball, and I have absolutely no regrets.

    Now it’s time for the next chapter. I have new dreams and aspirations, and I want new challenges. There are many things I want to do in business and philanthropic work, in addition to focusing more on my personal life and starting a family of my own. And I want the ability to move at my own pace, see the world and finally have a summer vacation.

    But before that, I want to soak in every moment of every day this year, so I can remember it for the rest of my life. And most importantly, I want to help the Yankees reach our goal of winning another championship.

    Once again, thank you.

    Derek Jeter

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    TAMPA, Fla. -- Derek Jeter fielded questions for a half hour Wednesday concerning the retirement announcement he posted to his Facebook page last week, and in truth, really didn't say much more than he had written in that lengthy blog.

    In fact, he and I had a brief give-and-take during the press conference that pretty much said it all. I asked him to clarify his reasons for retiring. His answer: "Did you read my Facebook page?"

    Jeter summed up his reasons for retiring in in four words: "The time is now."

    He said he wanted to do other things in his life, although he did not choose to share any of them at this time. It did seem, however, that starting a family was important to him. And on the whole, he did seem a bit more open to sharing a bit of himself, although truthfully, not all that much.

    Cotton Eye Jeet: Unlike Mariano Rivera, Jeter did not become emotional during his announcement. He acknowledged that he makes an effort not to show his emotions, but did say, "Yeah, I have feelings. I'm not emotionally stunted." Seated nearby in the team section, Joe Girardi gave a rueful smile.

    Blink of an eye: Asked what advise he would give to his younger teammates, Jeter said, "Enjoy it. It goes by quickly. You almost blink and it's 20 years later."

    No turning back: Jeter rejected the suggestion he might reconsider his decision if he has the kind of year he had in 2012, when he hit .316. "No, the time is now," he said. "It's not wait-and-see if I have a good year. I plan on having a good year."

    Find another angle: Jeter emphasized his decision has nothing to do with the state of his health or the condition of his fractured and surgically repaired left ankle. "My ankle was back to 100 percent healthy by the end of last year."

    Reality potion: "As much as I would like to, you can't do this forever," Jeter said.

    Alone on an island: Jeter acknowledged that the retirements of his closest friends on the team, especially Jorge Posada, started him thinking about hanging it as far back as two years ago.

    Regrets, he's had a few: "I didn't enjoy it as much as I should have," Jeter said of his 19-year career. "I never really enjoyed the ride. I'm going to try to enjoy each and every day this season." Girardi said that single-minded focus was one of the factors that made Jeter the player he became.

    No fungoes: Asked if he could see himself returning to The Boss in the future as one of the Yankees' guest instructors, Jeter was decisive: "No, I can't."

    Now get back to work: Jeter was appreciative that his teammates all came to the news conference to support him -- there were so many that Brett Gardner, Ichiro Suzuki, Michael Pineda and a few others were forced to stand in the back -- but The Captain in him came out after about 15 minutes: "If you guys have work to do, go do it. You don't have to stay here for me," he said.

    Answered Girardi: "Work's over for today."

    Yankee Doodle Dandy: Asked for how he would like to be remembered, Jeter said, "Just being remembered as a Yankee. Being a Yankee is good enough for me."

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    not only world class athleticism, this kid was blessed with what to say, how to say it, when to say it, and when to not say anything. 

    interesting about "starting a family"...girls everywhere are lining up in da boogie down...

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from jam789123. Show jam789123's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    Approximately 220 days of nausea to go!

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to jam789123's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Approximately 220 days of nausea to go!

    [/QUOTE] here you go jam.. 40 is the best i can do..use em wisely Tongue Out.....NAUZENE® Chewables

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    Jeter on the NY spotlight/microscope..............“I learned at a young age playing in New York the expectation level, the criticism you have to be able to deal with,” said Jeter. “You don’t have to like it, but you have to be able to deal with it. … The only way to have sustainability in this game is to keep your emotions in check.”

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    winning the WS his first season in the bigs certainly helped. 

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    In response to slasher9's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    winning the WS his first season in the bigs certainly helped. 

    [/QUOTE] getting past that initial rough patch certainly helped Pedroia right the ship to become an outstanding player..


     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    true.  i remember many were yelling for pedroia to be sent back down, put on the bench, taken out back and sh0t.  thankfully Tito stuck with him.

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Jeter retiring

    btw jete - how were jeters offensive #'s out of the gate?  i dont remember him having a slump at the start?

     

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