June 6, 1944

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    June 6, 1944

    It was 67 years ago today that the greatest armarda in naval history invaded the shores of france in what was to be called the longest day. My dad was a then 21 year old sergeant that was a left waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator that had a bombing mission that day. I started this thread to pay homage to those brave veterans of WW2 that made the ultimate sacrifice that day and especially to the 101st Airborne Div and the 82nd Airborne Div who were major contributors to that battle and never stopped or faltered to bring victory in europe in 1945.

    My God Bless them all.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    morning big D, nice post....God forever bless those soldiers...
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    morning back at you big B! thanks my friend. you are one class act.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    Great post, Hammah. I can't even begin to imagine the courage those men showed that day. There were 2,499 Americans (4,414 Allied) who paid the ultimate price in the invasion.

    Bedford, Virginia, a small town about 90 minutes from where I grew up, lost 22 men at Normandy. It's the subject of a remarkable book titled "The Bedford Boys," which I highly recommend.


     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    Thanks Lloyd I'm going to look into that. funny thing, my dad survived 25 missions over europe with the 458th bomb group and even after I got out of the army he never wanted to talk to me about his experiences. By incredible coincidence our next door neighbor up the street who grew up with my father in roxbury also served with him over in england and was a crew chief that worked on those liberators. "Frankie" and my dad were pals right up until both their passing which was for me this past march 21st. Frankie passed away in January. Frankie told me how they were taking clerk typists and trainning them to be gunners because those guys didn't last that long.

    Back around 94 the collinsfoundation B-24 called the all american and the nine oh nine a B-17 flying fortress flew into Norwood mass for the July 4th holiday. I remember taking my dad and Frankie to go down and see them. I can't even begin to tell you what it was like watching these two veterans walking around that B-24 and seeing their group listed on the side under the title of Honor Crews. Pretty emotional Lloyd. Before Frankie passed away he told me that the only way to explain what it was like to be at 30,000 feet in combat in one of those bombers was one word. "Hell"
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    I watch all the movies out of respect for this generation:
    Saving Private Ryan
    Band of Brothers
    The Pacific
    Patton
    The Longest Day

    Those kids had unbelievable courage!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]Thanks Lloyd I'm going to look into that. funny thing, my dad survived 25 missions over europe with the 458th bomb group and even after I got out of the army he never wanted to talk to me about his experiences. By incredible coincidence our next door neighbor up the street who grew up with my father in roxbury also served with him over in england and was a crew chief that worked on those liberators. "Frankie" and my dad were pals right up until both their passing which was for me this past march 21st. Frankie passed away in January. Frankie told me how they were taking clerk typists and trainning them to be gunners because those guys didn't last that long. Back around 94 the collinsfoundation B-24 called the all american and the nine oh nine a B-17 flying fortress flew into Norwood mass for the July 4th holiday. I remember taking my dad and Frankie to go down and see them. I can't even begin to tell you what it was like watching these two veterans walking around that B-24 and seeing their group listed on the side under the title of Honor Crews. Pretty emotional Lloyd. Before Frankie passed away he told me that the only way to explain what it was like to be at 30,000 feet in combat in one of those bombers was one word. "Hell"
    Posted by Hammah29r2[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for sharing that, Hammah. I once met a D-Day veteran and, being fascinated by the subject, I couldn't help asking him questions. He finally said, very politely, "Son, I'm afraid it's still too difficult for me to talk about. I hope you understand."
    Of course, I can't possibly understand what he went through, what he saw, how many brothers he lost that day. What courage.
    Thanks to your dad, and to you, for all you've done.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ChifferBrane. Show ChifferBrane's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]It was 67 years ago today that the greatest armarda in naval history invaded the shores of france in what was to be called the longest day. My dad was a then 21 year old sergeant that was a left waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator that had a bombing mission that day. I started this thread to pay homage to those brave veterans of WW2 that made the ultimate sacrifice that day and especially to the 101st Airborne Div and the 82nd Airborne Div who were major contributors to that battle and never stopped or faltered to bring victory in europe in 1945. My God Bless them all.
    Posted by Hammah29r2[/QUOTE]

    Amen
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    I met Wild Bill Guarniere (sp) at the Borgata in Atlantic City about 3 years ago.  Anyone who saw Band of Brothers knows who he is.  We shot some craps together and chatted about certain aspects of the Series.  I did not want to pry to deep because those wounds are still fresh 60+ years later.  He had on all his pins, etc.  He used crutches as he lost his leg in the Battle of the Bulge (Bastone).  I felt honored to meet that hero.  Although he feels the heros are buried at Normandy, Bastone and Iwo.  A very humble man from Philly!
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: June 6, 1944 : Thanks for sharing that, Hammah. I once met a D-Day veteran and, being fascinated by the subject, I couldn't help asking him questions. He finally said, very politely, "Son, I'm afraid it's still too difficult for me to talk about. I hope you understand." Of course, I can't possibly understand what he went through, what he saw, how many brothers he lost that day. What courage. Thanks to your dad, and to you, for all you've done.
    Posted by LloydDobler[/QUOTE]

    Your welcome Lloyd and I really appreciate it. my generation coming back from south east asia wasn't exactly welcomed with open arms. The vets from ww2,korea and now the middle east got the kind of welcome home that we never did, however, that said, times have changed quite a bit and alot of folks that see my viet-nam veteran ball cap will say thank you to me and also welcome home which is kind of nice.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    posted at 6/6/2011 10:24 AM EDT
    www.boston.com/community/persona.html?UID=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f&plckUserId=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f">
    Posts: 5616
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    I watch all the movies out of respect for this generation:
    Saving Private Ryan
    Band of Brothers
    The Pacific
    Patton
    The Longest Day

    Those kids had unbelievable courage!


    Jim, I have an uncle who is going to be 90 this august who was a marine corp medic that went through the pacific theater from pearl harbor right to the surrender in 1945. he saw it all. he was only 19 years old and saw combat in every major battle during the pacific war. unbelievable.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]posted at 6/6/2011 10:24 AM EDT www.boston.com/community/persona.html?UID=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f&plckUserId=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f " /> jimdavis Posts: 5616 First: 12/6/2007 Last: 6/6/2011 I watch all the movies out of respect for this generation: Saving Private Ryan Band of Brothers The Pacific Patton The Longest Day Those kids had unbelievable courage! Jim, I have an uncle who is going to be 90 this august who was a marine corp medic that went through the pacific theater from pearl harbor right to the surrender in 1945. he saw it all. he was only 19 years old and saw combat in every major battle during the pacific war. unbelievable.
    Posted by Hammah29r2[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for sharing those stries, Hammah.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    glad to oblige Nizzy.

    saving private ryan
    band of brothers
    the pacific
    the longest day
    hamburger hill
    platoon
    full metal jacket
    forest gump

    all of the above movies were almost as real as real could get.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jimdavis. Show jimdavis's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]posted at 6/6/2011 10:24 AM EDT www.boston.com/community/persona.html?UID=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f&plckUserId=1729c551be95c2d7581dc2027656ea8f " /> jimdavis Posts: 5616 First: 12/6/2007 Last: 6/6/2011 I watch all the movies out of respect for this generation: Saving Private Ryan Band of Brothers The Pacific Patton The Longest Day Those kids had unbelievable courage! Jim, I have an uncle who is going to be 90 this august who was a marine corp medic that went through the pacific theater from pearl harbor right to the surrender in 1945. he saw it all. he was only 19 years old and saw combat in every major battle during the pacific war. unbelievable.
    Posted by Hammah29r2[/QUOTE]

    I'm sure he remembers that experience like it was yesterday.  I always think about what might have been for all those who did not survive.  How many kids, grandkids, and great grandkids were never born because of circumstance?  The sacrifice was enormous.

    By the way, the Marine Corp training segment of Full Metal Jacket is some of the best movie making in the history of cinema!
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    "If God wanted you on my obstacle, he would have miricled your azz up there."
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from SoxSoldRed. Show SoxSoldRed's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    My generation is a disgrace, and I salute the greatest generation.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from tom-uk. Show tom-uk's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    Great OP

    Half of the houses on my street in Newcastle, England have a different look because they were bombed to pieces.   Many of the children were evacuated to places away from the docks for the entire War.  Not only did this country pay a huge price in lives and treasure, but the average family up north here waited 20 years after the war for indoor toilets or even a banana.  The burden this country faced after the War has surprised me having grown up at school that was state of the art, etc....   I work with older folk and I hear stories about how shocked they are by what is taken for granted now.  Almost all the British old enough to remember the War, are quick to thank America for the support. 
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]My generation is a disgrace, and I salute the greatest generation.
    Posted by SoxSoldRed[/QUOTE]

    and exactly which generation is yours if you don't mind my asking?
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    www.boston.com/community/persona.html?UID=6025751cbbb7122a7e7f225127ed030a&plckUserId=6025751cbbb7122a7e7f225127ed030a">
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    Great OP

    Half of the houses on my street in Newcastle, England have a different look because they were bombed to pieces.   Many of the children were evacuated to places away from the docks for the entire War.  Not only did this country pay a huge price in lives and treasure, but the average family up north here waited 20 years after the war for indoor toilets or even a banana.  The burden this country faced after the War has surprised me having grown up at school that was state of the art, etc....   I work with older folk and I hear stories about how shocked they are by what is taken for granted now.  Almost all the British old enough to remember the War, are quick to thank America for the support.


    Hi Tom,
    thanks for sharing that with us. seems to me that they are still finding un-exploded ordinance under the streets of london. my dad was stationed at horsham st faith near kettering I believe. he told me how when they were standing down from a mission they would watch the spitfires chasing the V1 buzzbombs heading to london from accross the channel and how they would try and tip their wings to offset the gyros. he said as long as you heard the engine you were alright but when it stopped everyone needed to hit the dirt. the brits really had it stacked against them back in 41 before we entered the war. dad said alot of american flyers went over to england early to volunteer and basically had aircraft that were bullet riddled to fly. I should have mentioned "The battle of Britian" as another extrodinary war movie.

    Just wondering Tom, have you ever seen 12 O'clock high starring gregory peck?
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    Just looked up 12 O' high don't think I have.

    I'm more into the WWII books than the movies, but I like both.  I met Anthony Beevor who wrote Berlin and also Stalingrad, great reads.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from markes8336. Show markes8336's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]Great OP Half of the houses on my street in Newcastle, England have a different look because they were bombed to pieces.   Many of the children were evacuated to places away from the docks for the entire War.  Not only did this country pay a huge price in lives and treasure, but the average family up north here waited 20 years after the war for indoor toilets or even a banana.  The burden this country faced after the War has surprised me having grown up at school that was state of the art, etc....   I work with older folk and I hear stories about how shocked they are by what is taken for granted now.  Almost all the British old enough to remember the War, are quick to thank America for the support. 
    Posted by tom-uk[/QUOTE]

    As an American veteran, I have the greatest respect for all of our armed forces personnel, past and present. I served at the tail end of the Vietnam Conflict -can't say where -  cuz we were never there ;)
    My step dad and several uncles were WWII vets, and my grandfather made it through the first World War, only to fall in the second. I have always been fascinated by the history of the Great Wars, and it is my specialty area as a History teacher.
    I am very proud of what Americans accomplished during WWII, but there is also a special place in my heart for the civilians of England who weathered the Battle of Britain, along with the civilian populations of the occupied nations. Many of them were great heroes, too.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SoxSoldRed. Show SoxSoldRed's posts

    Re: June 6, 1944

    My generation is the "if it feels good and involves consenting adults it's OK" generation.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    In Response to Re: June 6, 1944:
    [QUOTE]My generation is the "if it feels good and involves consenting adults it's OK" generation.
    Posted by SoxSoldRed[/QUOTE]

    Don't sell your generation too short.
    While this is, indeed, an age of instant gratification; there are still some great things being done by young people in this country. Also - remember, it was MY generation that coined "If it feels good, do it!" as a creed in the 60's & 70's. We outgrew it (well...most of us - lol), and so will your generation. The fact that people like you recognize that your generation has weaknesses (as did every other) is the very foundation upon which will come growth and change.
     
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    Re: June 6, 1944

    There will be no growth, but there has been a lot of bad "change". The only foundation from the 60's and 70's generation is marxist "visions" and hedonistic social values.
     

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