Loss column and games in hand

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BosoxJoe5. Show BosoxJoe5's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to moonslav59's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    I get the point of this thread, but if I had a choice of being 1 down in the win column vs 1 down in the loss column, I'd chose the former. It means your future is more in your own hands: what you do with it is another matter.

    Sox4ever

     



    Exactly. Thats why the lost column IS more important than the win column. Anyone know how it works out if we finish the season tied with the Rays? Is it our record against them that determines who is the division winner and who is the WC? I believe thats the way it works. Right now we are 10-6 against the Rays with only three games against them left, so we have already won the series against them for the year. I believe that functionally gives us an additional game ahead of them in terms of winning the division since they have to finish ahead of us, not tied, to win the division. That could come in handy.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Assuming the Rays a WC team, if not a one game playoff before the one game WC round.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoUconn13. Show GoUconn13's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    This is a stupid new rule.  If in a week and half, Boston win  two out of three games series in Tampa, still ends up tying Tampa for the divisional title, and then they will still have to play against Tampa in Boston for one freakin game playoff game.  Boston would have 12 to 7 record against Tampa this year.   It is more competitve if we use this head to head record as a tie breaker for winning the divisional title.   Remember Boston and Yankees went down to the wire for the divisional title in 2005 on the last regular season game between two clubs playing against each other to determine the divisional title!!  That was a hard fought weekend between two clubs. 

    That is too many games for a wildcard team to move on to a divisional game as well that is one game too many for a winning playoff team to play for the one game playoff game.  That will ruin the pitching rotation.  Imagine, Tampa and Boston both have the best record in AL, and one of the team would possible have to force to use their best pitcher such as Rays to use Price.  And he may not be able to pitch in the first game of the divisional round playoff game.

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    It might be often overstated, but it's not nonsense i.e. a loss is booked whereas an unplayed game is not. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to GoUconn13's comment:

    This is a stupid new rule.  If in a week and half, Boston win  two out of three games series in Tampa, still ends up tying Tampa for the divisional title, and then they will still have to play against Tampa in Boston for one freakin game playoff game.  Boston would have 12 to 7 record against Tampa this year.   It is more competitve if we use this head to head record as a tie breaker for winning the divisional title.   Remember Boston and Yankees went down to the wire for the divisional title in 2005 on the last regular season game between two clubs playing against each other to determine the divisional title!!  That was a hard fought weekend between two clubs. 

    That is too many games for a wildcard team to move on to a divisional game as well that is one game too many for a winning playoff team to play for the one game playoff game.  That will ruin the pitching rotation.  Imagine, Tampa and Boston both have the best record in AL, and one of the team would possible have to force to use their best pitcher such as Rays to use Price.  And he may not be able to pitch in the first game of the divisional round playoff game.

     

     



    They did use the head to head record as a tiebreaker before the advent of the second wild card team, and the one game playoff between the two wild cards. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from natepioneer0350. Show natepioneer0350's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to BurritoT-'s comment:

    Nate & The Pioneers could be a great 1950's folk band.




    was quite a folky back in the day, I might add.


    The Pioneer part is that I live in the Pioneer Valley FWIW

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to Ice-Cream's comment:

     

     

    Boston is 10-6 vs. the Rays this year (which means that Boston has won the season series). So "IF" the Red Sox and Rays finish the season with the same record, wouldn't the AL East division go to the Red Sox?  

     

     


    It used to be, but apparently its not that way anymore. 

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

    In response to moonslav59's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    I get the point of this thread, but if I had a choice of being 1 down in the win column vs 1 down in the loss column, I'd chose the former. It means your future is more in your own hands: what you do with it is another matter.

    Sox4ever

     



    But it is 3 games even they win 2 of 3 they would both play better than their record and finish a game back.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I get how it works, but seriously, if you had a choice to be down in the win column of loss column, you'd chose the win column. If you are down 1 in the loss column, you can win all your games and still finish second. If you are one down in the win column and even or ahead in the loss column, then if you win out, you will not finish in second. Surely, that seems better. It puts the ball more in your court than theirs.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Loss column and games in hand

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

    In response to GoUconn13's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    This is a stupid new rule.  If in a week and half, Boston win  two out of three games series in Tampa, still ends up tying Tampa for the divisional title, and then they will still have to play against Tampa in Boston for one freakin game playoff game.  Boston would have 12 to 7 record against Tampa this year.   It is more competitve if we use this head to head record as a tie breaker for winning the divisional title.   Remember Boston and Yankees went down to the wire for the divisional title in 2005 on the last regular season game between two clubs playing against each other to determine the divisional title!!  That was a hard fought weekend between two clubs. 

    That is too many games for a wildcard team to move on to a divisional game as well that is one game too many for a winning playoff team to play for the one game playoff game.  That will ruin the pitching rotation.  Imagine, Tampa and Boston both have the best record in AL, and one of the team would possible have to force to use their best pitcher such as Rays to use Price.  And he may not be able to pitch in the first game of the divisional round playoff game.

     

     

     



    They did use the head to head record as a tiebreaker before the advent of the second wild card team, and the one game playoff between the two wild cards. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citationsPlease improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (January 2013)

    Because inclusion in the Major League Baseball postseason is based upon the teams' regular-season records, procedures exist to break ties between teams.

    In common parlance, the Major League Baseball postseason is described as "the playoffs", for consistency with the nomenclature of other professional leagues (i.e. NFL PlayoffsNBA Playoffs, etc.). However, the term "playoff" is only used by Major League Baseball to describe tie-breaking games that determine postseason berths. Games after the regular season are officially referred to as postseasongames.

    Contents    [hide Ties between two teams[edit source | editbeta] Two-way tie for the division or wildcard[edit source | editbeta] Main article: One-game playoff

    One game tie-breakers are played between teams tied for a division championship or the second wildcard berth in either league. These games are played the day after the season was scheduled to end. Home-field advantage for these games is determined using the rules listed below ("Breaking Ties Without Playoff Games").

    From the implementation of the wild card in 1994 through to the end of the 2011 season, two teams tied for a division would not play a tie-breaker if their records were better than all non-division winners in the league - in that case, the tie was broken using the rules listed below ("Breaking Ties Without Playoff Games"). This scenario happened in the 2005 Major League Baseball season when the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox tied for first place in the American League East - the Yankees were awarded the division title on account of a better head-to-head record against the Red Sox, while Boston received the wild card.

    However, with the implementation of a second wild card berth and wild card game beginning in the 2012 season, the non-division winner with the best record in the league now faces the possibility of elimination on the first day of the postseason. As a result, the tie-breaking rules were changed so that two teams tied for a division championship must play a tie breaking game even if both teams have already qualified for the postseason. The team losing the tie-break would qualify for a wildcard berth only if its regular season record is one of the two best records of teams from each league that are not division champions. If the losing team's regular season record is tied with a team outside the division for the second wild card spot, a second tie-break would be held between the team losing the division championship tie-break and the team outside the division with the same record to determine the final wild card spot.

    Starting in 2012, two wildcard teams are selected from each league. If these two teams are tied with each other (and with no other teams) at the end of the regular season, no tie-breaking game is played. Home field advantage in the Wild Card Showdown is awarded according to tie-breakers outlined in the next section.

    Breaking ties without playoff games[edit source | editbeta]
    1. The team with the best record in head to head play.
    2. The team with the best overall record in intradivision games.
    3. The team with the best record in the final 81 games of the season, ignoring interleague play.
    4. The team with the best record in the final 82 games of the season (providing the game added is not between the tied teams), extending backward until the tie is broken (since teams in the same division play each other as many as 19 times, this step is guaranteed to break the tie. Interleague games are skipped and ignored in this process.)
    Ties between two division winners[edit source | editbeta]

    If two champions from separate divisions have the same record, the tiebreaking procedure listed above is used to determine playoff seeding. No additional games are played.

    Ties between three teams[edit source | editbeta] Three-way tie for the division or wildcard[edit source | editbeta]

    The three teams will be designated as "A", "B" and "C". A two-game elimination format will ensue. In Game 1, A will host B. The following day, in Game 2, the winner of Game 1 will host C. The winner of Game 2 advances to the postseason.

    The designations for teams A, B and C will be determined by the applicable scenario below.

    1. If the three teams have identical records against each other in the regular season:

    • Club with highest winning percentage among three tied clubs in intradivision games chooses its designation, followed by the team with the next highest winning percentage in intradivision games. If any two of the clubs have identical winning percentages, then the two-Club tiebreak rules will break that tie. If all three Clubs have identical winning percentages, then;
    • Club with the highest winning percentage in the last half of intraleague games chooses its designation, followed by the team with the next highest winning percentage in intraleague games. If any two of the clubs have identical winning percentages, then the two-Club tiebreak rules will break that tie. If all three Clubs have identical winning percentages, then;
    • Club with the highest winning percentage in the last half plus one intraleague game, provided that such additional game was not between any of the tied Clubs, chooses its designation, followed by the team with the next highest winning percentage in the last half plus one intraleague game. Continue to go back one intraleague game at a time until the tie has been broken.

    2. If the three teams do not have identical records against one another, the team designations are determined as follows:

    • If one team has a better record against both other teams, and another team has a winning record against the final team, the first team shall get the first pick of their team designation, the second team gets the second pick, and the last team is assigned the remaining designation.
    • If one team has a better record against both of the other teams, and the two other teams have the same record against each other, then the first team gets the first pick for team designation, and the other teams would follow the two-team tiebreak rules to break their tie to pick the next designation. The last team would be assigned the remaining designation.
    • If two teams have the same record against each other, and both have a better record than the last team, then the first two teams would follow the two-team tiebreak rules to break their tie to pick the first designation, with the looser of the tiebreak choosing their designation second, and the last team team being assigned the remaining designation.
    • If Club 1 has a better record against Club 2, Club 2 has a better record against Club 3, and Club 3 has a better record against Club 1; OR Club 1 has a better record against Club 2, Club 2 and 3 have identical records against one another and Club 3 has a better record against Club 1; OR Club 1 and 2 have identical records against one another, Club 1 has a better record against Club 3 and Club 2 and 3 have identical records against one another, then:
    a. The Clubs will be ranked by their overall winning percentage amongst the other Clubs combined. The Club with the highest overall winning percentage in that group chooses its designation, followed by the team with the next highest overall winning percentage.
    b. If two of the Clubs have identical winning percentages, then they would follow the two-Club tiebreak rules to break their tie to pick their designation.
    c. If all three teams have identical winning percentages, then the tiebreak rules above (No. 1) for three clubs having identical records against one another should be followed.
    "Mixed" three-way tie[edit source | editbeta]

    The situation may arise that two teams from the same division are tied for the division championship, but they are also tied with another team from a different division, with that team not having the best record in their division, but having a better record than all of the other non-division winners.

    In this case the two teams in the same division play a one game playoff, with the winner declared the division champion. The loser of the first game earns the #2 wildcard slot, and travels to the stadium of the team outside their division for the Wild Card Showdown.

    Three-way tie for two Wild Card spots[edit source | editbeta]

    In a situation where there is a three way tie between non division winners and there is no other non division winner with a better record claiming wild card 1; a tiebreaker eliminating 1 of the 3 teams will follow. Based on a group head to head record. Teams A, B and C will be created. Team B will travel to team A. The winner wins wild card one. The loser will go to team C. The winner of that game wins wild card two. After those two games, wild card teams one and two will play each other in the wild card round. Can be an" A/B rematch". This information was provided by the MLB Commissioners office.

    Three-way ties among division winners[edit source | editbeta]

    If there is a three-way tie among all division champions, the team with the best record against both of the other division champion is given the top seed with the remaining teams seeded as follows:

    1. Head to head record between other 2 division winners.
    2. Best overall record in the regular season ignoring interleague play.
    3. The team with the best record in the final 81 games of the season, ignoring interleague play.
    4. The team with the best record in the final 82 games of the season (providing the game added is not between some of the tied teams), extending backward until the tie is broken (since teams in the same division play each other as much as 19 times, this step is guaranteed to break the tie, with interleague games skipped and ignored in this process.)

    If neither team has a better record against the other teams, immediately go to above tiebreaker.

    Ties among four teams[edit source | editbeta]

    The four teams draw lots, as teams A, B, C, and D. On the first day team B plays at team A and team D plays at team C. The next day the winners of these games play each other at the ballpark of either team A or B (depending on who won the game).

    References[edit source | editbeta]
     

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