obstruction rule

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    obstruction rule

    I thought the runner had to be in base path and that was not in basepath.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    IT'S CALLED WHATEVER THEY CAN DO SO THE CARDINALS WIN, DO IT.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from emp9. Show emp9's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    Worst call in the history of sports. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    UNFREAKENBELIEVABLE. AND HE WAS ALREADY DOWN. IT'S NOT LIKE HE GOT DOWN TO OBSTRUCT A GUY NOT IN THE BASEPATH OR WHATEVER.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    Obstruction

    Obstruction (Rule 7.06) is called when the defense hinders the runner’s ability to run the bases. There are two different applications of the rule. One causes an immediate dead ball and the other is delayed dead. If a play is being made on a runner who is obstructed, the ball is immediately dead. If no play is being made the ball is delayed dead. A play, for purposes of this rule is when the ball is being thrown, or is in-flight, heading toward the base to which the runner is heading, an attempted tag, or when the runner is caught in a run-down. The rulebook definition is: 

    "OBSTRUCTION is the act of a fielder who, while not in possession of the ball and not in the act of fielding the ball, impedes the progress of any runner.  

    If a fielder is about to receive a thrown ball, and if the ball is in flight, directly toward, and near enough to the fielder, so he must occupy his position to receive the ball, he may be considered "in the act of fielding a ball." It is entirely up to the judgment of the umpire, as to whether a fielder is in the act of fielding a ball. After a fielder has made an attempt to field a ball, and has missed, he can no longer be in the "act of fielding" the ball. For example: an infielder dives at a ground ball and the ball passes him and he continues to lie on the ground and delays the progress of the runner, he very likely has obstructed the runner." 

    A fake tag is considered obstruction. A fake tag is when the fielder is at a base and takes an action that simulates an attempted tag, which causes the runner to slow down or slide. Faking a catch of a ball while not near a base or the basepath, is not a fake tag. 

    The fielder may stand in the basepath without the ball IF the throw is almost to him, and he needs to move there to catch the ball. This is considered “the act of fielding.” However, he may not actually block access to the base until he has possession of the ball, or starts the act of fielding. Until he has possession, or becomes “in the act of fielding” the ball, he must give the runner some way to get to the base.         

    It is never obstruction when the fielder is in the base path while he is attempting to field a batted ball. Obstruction only applies when the fielder is in the path for no reason, or is in the path prior to being in the act of fielding a throw, or does not have possession of the ball. 

    A fielder's "attempt to field" a batted ball ends immediately upon missing or deflecting the ball and such fielder must, in effect, disappear or risk obstruction. 

    A fielder is "in the act of fielding" and it is NOT obstruction, if, his block of the base, is a fluid, continuous result of his effort to glove the ball.

    Separate, discontinuous movement, whose sole purpose is to block the base, is obstruction. 

    As with interference, obstruction is also a tough judgment call. Contact between the runner and fielder is not necessary to meet the definition. If a runner must slow down or alter his path to avoid a fielder who is not in possession of the ball or "in the act of fielding" a throw, he has been obstructed. 

    If no play is being made on the runner at the time he is obstructed, the play continues. “Time” is not called until all play ends. The tough part comes when the play stops. The umpire will award the runner the base to which the umpire believes he would have reached had he not been obstructed. The play ends and “Time” is called, when the obstructed runner is tagged out, or he ceases to continue to advance, or he gets caught in a run-down, or all action ends. At that time, the umpire may, award bases or not, in order to nullify the obstruction. 

    For example: the batter hits a ball in the gap for what looks like an easy double. No play is being made on him. As he rounds first the fielder is in his path and they collide. The batter stops at first. The umpire will award the runner second base, if he believes; the runner was making a legitimate effort to advance to second base and could have made it, had he not been obstructed. The umpire will protect the runner back to first base, if the runner was not making an attempt for second, but the obstruction hindered his ability to get back to first, before being put out. 

    It does not matter where the obstruction occurs. If a runner is obstructed at first base and the umpire believes he could have made it to third base, he will be awarded third. The umpire must be the judge. If, in the umpire's judgment, a runner is slowed down at first base, and the umpire judges that the runner had a chance for a triple, but then is thrown out at third base, the out should be nullified because of the obstruction at first. However, if the runner is obstructed at first base and the umpire believes that only a double is possible, and the runner advances to third and is thrown out; the out would stand. 

    If the runner reaches the base to which the umpire has protected him, and he advances further during the action, and is put out, the out will stand. 

    An immediate dead ball obstruction is called when obstruction occurs while a play is being made on the runner. 

    For example: a runner on first is attempting to reach third on a hit. A fielder obstructs him, between second and third, as the throw from the outfield is heading toward third. This is a play on the runner. The umpire should call "time" when the obstruction occurs and award the runner third base. Another example is a run-down play. It does not matter which way the runner is heading. If he is obstructed while being played upon in a run-down, he is awarded at least one base beyond the last base he held. 

    If a runner is obstructed attempting to get back to first on a pick-off play, the ball is dead and he is awarded second. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: obstruction rule


    OK based upon the rule above it was not obstruction. If it was the play should have been called dead and not allowed to continue. Also if you read the bold part it was not obstruction. Umps IMHO got it wrong.

    Trying to figure out why there was no conference like there was in first game. This ended the game and was far more important than the conference in the first game.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: obstruction rule


    I said I didn't understand why it ended so quickly without any further discussion. They must have been so happy they thought the found a way to get the Cardinals a win. There wasn't even anyone left on the field. And that's a win? Even the Cardinals didn't want to be there. They wanted to just call it a game and a win.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from makinbiscuitz. Show makinbiscuitz's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    For example: an infielder dives at a ground ball and the ball passes him and he continues to lie on the ground and delays the progress of the runner, he very likely has obstructed the runner." 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from joel49. Show joel49's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I thought the runner had to be in base path and that was not in basepath.

    [/QUOTE]


    Obstruction is defined as "the act of a fielder who, while not in possession of the ball and not in the act of fielding the ball, impedes the progress of any runner."  One might argue that Middlebrooks was in the act of (or after act of, if you will) fielding the ball.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ctredsoxfanhugh. Show ctredsoxfanhugh's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I thought the runner had to be in base path and that was not in basepath.

    [/QUOTE]

    I was thinking the same thing.  He was a couple feet off the bag trying to run past middlebrook, plus the fielders natural instinct should be tomjump up and go after the ball so what was he supposed to do, just lay there?

    Regardlessmi think throwing to third was just dumb.  That's the winning run and it's a risky play, plus you have two outs with Koji on the mound....just stupid.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    this was the worst call i ever witnessed...i hope all those umps drop dead tonight

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    NOT ONLY WAS HE FIELDING THE BALL WHEN HE WENT DOWN, HE WAS ALSO PUSHED DOWN AGAIN BY THE RUNNER. WHAT DO THEY CALL THAT I WONDER?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from KMONT550. Show KMONT550's posts

    Re: obstruction rule


    The only problem I have is this - it is a bang bang play.  I understand that he has to get up quickly so he doesn't impede the runner but the guy pushed him down when he was in the act of running.  I know it is moot since really Middlebrooks shouldn't have been on the ground - he should have left the bag and caught the ball but didn't.  I think this was questionable because the runners hand did keep middlebrooks down

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from emp9. Show emp9's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    A base runner should not be allowed to push-off, otherwise known as interfere, with the fielder. 

    That was THE WORST CALL BY AN OFFICIAL IN THE HISTORY OF SPORTS. 

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    He wasn't fielding the ball.  The ball was past him.  the runner tripped over him. Was it Middlebrooks fault?  No.  Was there anything that Middlebrooks could have done to avoid the obstruction?  No.  But it's still obstruction.  Was there anything the Red Six could have done? yeah.  Salty could have thrown the ball to third.

    should never have been an issue.  if Salty makes the throw to 3rd, he's out at third.

    they didnt lose because of the umps.  The lost because they can't throw to 3rd.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Dabro. Show Dabro's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    the base runner chose to run inside the base line by two or three feet for whatever reason.  he had a clear path to home and chose not to take it.  He induced obstruction.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from emp9. Show emp9's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    He wasn't fielding the ball.  The ball was past him.  the runner tripped over him. Was it Middlebrooks fault?  No.  Was there anything that Middlebrooks could have done to avoid the obstruction?  No.  But it's still obstruction.  Was there anything the Red Six could have done? yeah.  Salty could have thrown the ball to third.

    should never have been an issue.  if Salty makes the throw to 3rd, he's out at third.

    they didnt lose because of the umps.  The lost because they can't throw to 3rd.

    [/QUOTE]

    No. They lost because the ump made the worst call in the history of sport. End of story.

    I should've known it was going to be like this from watching game 1. The ump dead-staring at 2b and got the call wrong. The easiest call in the world and got it wrong. 

     

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from rameakap. Show rameakap's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to Dabro's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    the base runner chose to run inside the base line by two or three feet for whatever reason.  he had a clear path to home and chose not to take it.  He induced obstruction.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yup

    but of course ESPN is now trumpeting the entire... 'regardless of intent if a player dives and lies in the basepaths impeding the runner it is obstruction'

    disgusting 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Thesemenarecowards. Show Thesemenarecowards's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    This is my question.  Craig takes a step to the inside of the third base line and is well inside the baseline when he contacts Middlebrooks.  Does that not matter?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from emp9. Show emp9's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to rameakap's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Dabro's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    the base runner chose to run inside the base line by two or three feet for whatever reason.  he had a clear path to home and chose not to take it.  He induced obstruction.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yup

    but of course ESPN is now trumpeting the entire... 'regardless of intent if a player dives and lies in the basepaths impeding the runner it is obstruction'

    disgusting 

    [/QUOTE]

    Who cares what ESPN says? That's like getting critical music listening lessons from Mtv. They're garbage. 

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    Middlebrooks was clearly sticking his feet in the air to trip the base runner, and the umpire caught him.  Let's not kid ourselves.  Plus salty should not have thrown to 3b and MBR should have made a better effort to catch it.  

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Thesemenarecowards. Show Thesemenarecowards's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    Joyce even said in his post game press conference that Craig was "right on the chalk"  no he wasn't, he popped up and stepped toward 2nd base. 

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from freediro. Show freediro's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    Craig was looking back at the ball, then started to run still looking backwards and was no where near the chalk, he pushed down Middlebrooks facing 2N as he tried to get out of the way and then Craig tripped on him. Craig had plenty of chances to not let Middlebrooks be in his way. This is the biggest non call in the world, if the Sox are not fired up to come out and win the next game then we have bigger issues.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    IT'S CALLED WHATEVER THEY CAN DO SO THE CARDINALS WIN, DO IT.

    Kim, not every call against the Sox is a "spite" call...that said i do think you guys  will win game 4

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: obstruction rule

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:
    [QUOTE]Obstruction

    Obstruction (Rule 7.06) is called when the defense hinders the runner’s ability to run the bases. There are two different applications of the rule. One causes an immediate dead ball and the other is delayed dead. If a play is being made on a runner who is obstructed, the ball is immediately dead. If no play is being made the ball is delayed dead. A play, for purposes of this rule is when the ball is being thrown, or is in-flight, heading toward the base to which the runner is heading, an attempted tag, or when the runner is caught in a run-down. The rulebook definition is: 

     

     

    A fake tag is considered obstruction. A fake tag is when the fielder is at a base and takes an action that simulates an attempted tag, which causes the runner to slow down or slide. Faking a catch of a ball while not near a base or the basepath, is not a fake tag. 

    The fielder may stand in the basepath without the ball IF the throw is almost to him, and he needs to move there to catch the ball. This is considered “the act of fielding.” However, he may not actually block access to the base until he has possession of the ball, or starts the act of fielding. Until he has possession, or becomes “in the act of fielding” the ball, he must give the runner some way to get to the base.         

    It is never obstruction when the fielder is in the base path while he is attempting to field a batted ball. Obstruction only applies when the fielder is in the path for no reason, or is in the path prior to being in the act of fielding a throw, or does not have possession of the ball. 

    A fielder's "attempt to field" a batted ball ends immediately upon missing or deflecting the ball and such fielder must, in effect, disappear or risk obstruction. 

    A fielder is "in the act of fielding" and it is NOT obstruction, if, his block of the base, is a fluid, continuous result of his effort to glove the ball.

    Separate, discontinuous movement, whose sole purpose is to block the base, is obstruction. 

    As with interference, obstruction is also a tough judgment call. Contact between the runner and fielder is not necessary to meet the definition. If a runner must slow down or alter his path to avoid a fielder who is not in possession of the ball or "in the act of fielding" a throw, he has been obstructed. 

    If no play is being made on the runner at the time he is obstructed, the play continues. “Time” is not called until all play ends. The tough part comes when the play stops. The umpire will award the runner the base to which the umpire believes he would have reached had he not been obstructed. The play ends and “Time” is called, when the obstructed runner is tagged out, or he ceases to continue to advance, or he gets caught in a run-down, or all action ends. At that time, the umpire may, award bases or not, in order to nullify the obstruction. 

    For example: the batter hits a ball in the gap for what looks like an easy double. No play is being made on him. As he rounds first the fielder is in his path and they collide. The batter stops at first. The umpire will award the runner second base, if he believes; the runner was making a legitimate effort to advance to second base and could have made it, had he not been obstructed. The umpire will protect the runner back to first base, if the runner was not making an attempt for second, but the obstruction hindered his ability to get back to first, before being put out. 

    It does not matter where the obstruction occurs. If a runner is obstructed at first base and the umpire believes he could have made it to third base, he will be awarded third. The umpire must be the judge. If, in the umpire's judgment, a runner is slowed down at first base, and the umpire judges that the runner had a chance for a triple, but then is thrown out at third base, the out should be nullified because of the obstruction at first. However, if the runner is obstructed at first base and the umpire believes that only a double is possible, and the runner advances to third and is thrown out; the out would stand. 

    If the runner reaches the base to which the umpire has protected him, and he advances further during the action, and is put out, the out will stand. 

    An immediate dead ball obstruction is called when obstruction occurs while a play is being made on the runner. 

    For example: a runner on first is attempting to reach third on a hit. A fielder obstructs him, between second and third, as the throw from the outfield is heading toward third. This is a play on the runner. The umpire should call "time" when the obstruction occurs and award the runner third base. Another example is a run-down play. It does not matter which way the runner is heading. If he is obstructed while being played upon in a run-down, he is awarded at least one base beyond the last base he held. 

    If a runner is obstructed attempting to get back to first on a pick-off play, the ball is dead and he is awarded second. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Here's MLB's obstruction rule:

    OBSTRUCTION is the act of a fielder who, while not in possession of the ball and
    not in the act of fielding the ball, impedes the progress of any runner.
    Rule 2.00 (Obstruction) Comment: If a fielder is about to receive a thrown ball and if the ball
    is in flight directly toward and near enough to the fielder so he must occupy his position to receive the
    ball he may be considered “in the act of fielding a ball.” It is entirely up to the judgment of the umpire
    as to whether a fielder is in the act of fielding a ball. After a fielder has made an attempt to field a ball
    and missed, he can no longer be in the “act of fielding” the ball. For example: an infielder dives at a
    ground ball and the ball passes him and he continues to lie on the ground and delays the progress of
    the runner, he very likely has obstructed the runner



    by rule i could be(and was) called...FTR imo totally unintentional but still callable....tough way to lose

     

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