The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from 56redsox. Show 56redsox's posts

    The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    Cost The Braves Dearly, I Felt Bad For Chipper, I Will Root For The Nationals In The NL, Detriot In The AL,

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    The 3 errors did them in.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    1.  The call did not cost the Braves anything.  Their horrific infield defense did.

     

    2.  The umpire got the call right.  Learn the rule.  It applies to outfielders as well, and that is specifically stated in the rulebook...

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    The call was correct and truly it cost them nada. But it is a judgement call by the ump, I don't remember seeing an infield fly rule called that deep into the outfield.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ADG. Show ADG's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    In response to notin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1.  The call did not cost the Braves anything.  Their horrific infield defense did.

     

    2.  The umpire got the call right.  Learn the rule.  It applies to outfielders as well, and that is specifically stated in the rulebook...

    [/QUOTE]

    It's a judgement call and an interpretation of the rules. Ask yourself what is the purpose of the call? It's to protect the baserunners from having the fielder drop the ball on purpose so as to get a double play. It only applies to either 1st and 2nd or the bases loaded with less than two outs. 

    Ask yourself:

    1. Would the fielder, assuming the ball dropped been able to get a double play due to the players not running.

    2. Was it at or near the infield? Read the wording highlighted please. Yes it doesn't matter, but the ball was 225 feet away from home plate. The longest infield fly rule all year in baseball this season was measured at 185 feet. 

    Who knows if the Braves would have come back, but it was a horrible call.

    An INFIELD FLY is a fair fly ball (not including a line drive nor an attempted bunt) which can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort, when first and second, or first, second and third bases are occupied, before two are out. The pitcher, catcher and any outfielder who stations himself in the infield on the play shall be considered infielders for the purpose of this rule.
    When it seems apparent that a batted ball will be an Infield Fly, the umpire shall immediately declare “Infield Fly” for the benefit of the runners. If the ball is near the baselines, the umpire shall declare “Infield Fly, if Fair.”
    The ball is alive and runners may advance at the risk of the ball being caught, or retouch and advance after the ball is touched, the same as on any fly ball. If the hit becomes a foul ball, it is treated the same as any foul.
    If a declared Infield Fly is allowed to fall untouched to the ground, and bounces foul before passing first or third base, it is a foul ball. If a declared Infield Fly falls untouched to the ground outside the baseline, and bounces fair before passing first or third base, it is an Infield Fly.
    Rule 2.00 (Infield Fly) Comment: On the infield fly rule the umpire is to rule whether the ball could ordinarily have been handled by an infielder—not by some arbitrary limitation such as the grass, or the base lines. The umpire must rule also that a ball is an infield fly, even if handled by an outfielder, if, in the umpire’s judgment, the ball could have been as easily handled by an infielder. The infield fly is in no sense to be considered an appeal play. The umpire’s judgment must govern, and the decision should be made immediately.
    When an infield fly rule is called, runners may advance at their own risk. If on an infield fly rule, the infielder intentionally drops a fair ball, the ball remains in play despite the provisions of Rule 6.05 (L). The infield fly rule takes precedence.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    The Braves are crybabies.

    The Rangers tried to delay the Baltimore steamroller with phony delay tactics, trying to claim Darvish had a sore or stiff neck. He pitched excellent, there was nothing physically wrong with him or they would have started someone else.  He just got out pitched by Saunders.

    I am so glad St.L and Baltimore advanced. The losers both got what they deserved.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Modano9009. Show Modano9009's posts

    Re: The New Outfield Fly Rule, Throwing Errors, And A Bunt...

    I take the infield fly rule to apply to a fly, typically in the infield, that the fielder is standing under waiting to make an easy catch. Not when the infielder is chasing a ball to the outfield that he never did get to. If he runs out there and is in position in plenty of time to catch the ball it could be an infield fly, but that's not what happened. I've seen similiar plays countless times where an infielder chases a ball he thinks he has a read on, so the outfielder backs off, and neither end up catching it, never called an infield fly. I've also seen one of them pick up the ball and throw out the runner who held up assuming it would be caught. It happens.

     

    I think it's a case of the umpire making a mistake and then trying to fit what happened into the definition of the rule to make it seem like the right call. 

     

    Is the rule even necessessary? If there's a runner on first and you let an infield fly drop, the only play you have is to second. The hitter should be at first in the time it takes for the ball to come down, the only play you can make is forcing out the runner at second. Unless the batter isn't running hard, then I guess you can force him out at first and get the runner in a run down but that doesn't happen if the batter is running and intentionally causing a run down seems like a risk.  If the fielder lets it drop they're just making a risky play that could go wrong so they can end up in the same situation they'd be in if they caught it. The only benefit I see is if the runner on first is a much faster runner than the hitter and you'd rather the slower runner on first.

     

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