USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from JayLenoTonight. Show JayLenoTonight's posts

    USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    I would also like to bring to your attention a little known, but very important part of the history of WWII. And I would like to pay tribute on this Memorial Day weekend to the gallant men who served on this cruiser.

     

    USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland-class cruiser of the United States Navy. She served as flagship for Admiral Raymond Spruance while he commanded the Fifth Fleet in their battles across the Central Pacific. She holds a place in history due to the circumstances of her sinking, which led to the greatest single loss of life at sea in the history of the U.S. Navy. On 30 July 1945, shortly after delivering critical parts for the first atomic bomb to be used in combat to the United States air base at Tinian, the ship was torpedoed by the Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-58, sinking in 12 minutes. Of 1,196 crewmen aboard, approximately 300 went down with the ship.

    The remaining 900 men faced exposure, dehydration, and shark attacks as they waited for assistance while floating with few lifeboats and almost no food or water. The Navy learned of the sinking when survivors were spotted four days later by the crew of a PV-1 Ventura on routine patrol. Only 316 sailors survived  Indianapolis was the last major U.S. Navy ship sunk by enemy action in World War II.

    The most well known fictional reference to the events occurs in the 1975 thriller film Jaws in a monologue by actor Robert Shaw, whose character Samuel Quint is depicted as a survivor of the Indianapolis sinking. The monologue particularly focuses on the numerous deaths caused by shark attacks after the sinking.

     

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    about 7 years ago, I had my students look this up online and the web site had some contact information with survivors - some of my kids wrote to these guys and asked them about their experiences and were thrilled when they wrote back - they were totally classy and grateful for my students interest in their story...once again proving they were...

    the greatest generation ever

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    This was a sad error made in the waning days of World War II .........  Another "big mistake" was in January 1968 when the Navy & CIA foolishly thought that they could put WWII TRANSPORT ships converted to SPY SHIPS (oceanagraphic..... B S ) USS PUEBLO off of such volatle places like WONSON NORTH KOREA when a Destroyer or Submarine could do the same thing.......   As a result, American sailors spent 11 months of tortore in that HE!! hole.  And the USS HIGBEE DD-806 was there..........  Would you be kind enough to do a spread on the USS PUEBLO ?????   Thanking you in advance  BILL-806 .....

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from JayLenoTonight. Show JayLenoTonight's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to Bill-806's comment:

    This was a sad error made in the waning days of World War II .........  Another "big mistake" was in January 1968 when the Navy & CIA foolishly thought that they could put WWII TRANSPORT ships converted to SPY SHIPS (oceanagraphic..... B S ) USS PUEBLO off of such volatle places like WONSON NORTH KOREA when a Destroyer or Submarine could do the same thing.......   As a result, American sailors spent 11 months of tortore in that HE!! hole.  And the USS HIGBEE DD-806 was there..........  Would you be kind enough to do a spread on the USS PUEBLO ?????   Thanking you in advance  BILL-806 .....


    The Pueblo incident

    On January 23, 1968, the USS Pueblo, a Navy intelligence vessel, is engaged in a routine surveillance of the North Korean coast when it is intercepted by North Korean patrol boats. According to U.S. reports, the Pueblo was in international waters almost 16 miles from shore, but the North Koreans turned their guns on the lightly armed vessel and demanded its surrender. The Americans attempted to escape, and the North Koreans opened fire, wounding the commander and two others. With capture inevitable, the Americans stalled for time, destroying the classified information aboard while taking further fire. Several more crew members were wounded.

    Finally, the Pueblo was boarded and taken to Wonson. There, the 83-man crew was bound and blindfolded and transported to Pyongyang, where they were charged with spying within North Korea's 12-mile territorial limit and imprisoned. It was the biggest crisis in two years of increased tension and minor skirmishes between the United States and North Korea.

    The United States maintained that the Pueblo had been in international waters and demanded the release of the captive sailors. With the Tet Offensive raging 2,000 miles to the south in Vietnam, President Lyndon Johnson ordered no direct retaliation, but the United States began a military buildup in the area. North Korean authorities, meanwhile, coerced a confession and apology out of Pueblo commander Bucher, in which he stated, "I will never again be a party to any disgraceful act of aggression of this type." The rest of the crew also signed a confession under threat of torture.

    The prisoners were then taken to a second compound in the countryside near Pyongyang, where they were forced to study propaganda materials and beaten for straying from the compound's strict rules. In August, the North Koreans staged a phony news conference in which the prisoners were to praise their humane treatment, but the Americans thwarted the Koreans by inserting innuendoes and sarcastic language into their statements. Some prisoners also rebelled in photo shoots by casually sticking out their middle finger; a gesture that their captors didn't understand. Later, the North Koreans caught on and beat the Americans for a week.

    On December 23, 1968, exactly 11 months after the Pueblo's capture, U.S. and North Korean negotiators reached a settlement to resolve the crisis. Under the settlement's terms, the United States admitted the ship's intrusion into North Korean territory, apologized for the action, and pledged to cease any future such action. That day, the surviving 82 crewmen walked one by one across the "Bridge of No Return" at Panmunjon to freedom in South Korea. They were hailed as heroes and returned home to the United States in time for Christmas.

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to JayLenoTonight's comment:

    In response to Bill-806's comment:

     

    This was a sad error made in the waning days of World War II .........  Another "big mistake" was in January 1968 when the Navy & CIA foolishly thought that they could put WWII TRANSPORT ships converted to SPY SHIPS (oceanagraphic..... B S ) USS PUEBLO off of such volatle places like WONSON NORTH KOREA when a Destroyer or Submarine could do the same thing.......   As a result, American sailors spent 11 months of tortore in that HE!! hole.  And the USS HIGBEE DD-806 was there..........  Would you be kind enough to do a spread on the USS PUEBLO ?????   Thanking you in advance  BILL-806 .....

     


    The Pueblo incident

     

    On January 23, 1968, the USS Pueblo, a Navy intelligence vessel, is engaged in a routine surveillance of the North Korean coast when it is intercepted by North Korean patrol boats. According to U.S. reports, the Pueblo was in international waters almost 16 miles from shore, but the North Koreans turned their guns on the lightly armed vessel and demanded its surrender. The Americans attempted to escape, and the North Koreans opened fire, wounding the commander and two others. With capture inevitable, the Americans stalled for time, destroying the classified information aboard while taking further fire. Several more crew members were wounded.

    Finally, the Pueblo was boarded and taken to Wonson. There, the 83-man crew was bound and blindfolded and transported to Pyongyang, where they were charged with spying within North Korea's 12-mile territorial limit and imprisoned. It was the biggest crisis in two years of increased tension and minor skirmishes between the United States and North Korea.

    The United States maintained that the Pueblo had been in international waters and demanded the release of the captive sailors. With the Tet Offensive raging 2,000 miles to the south in Vietnam, President Lyndon Johnson ordered no direct retaliation, but the United States began a military buildup in the area. North Korean authorities, meanwhile, coerced a confession and apology out of Pueblo commander Bucher, in which he stated, "I will never again be a party to any disgraceful act of aggression of this type." The rest of the crew also signed a confession under threat of torture.

    The prisoners were then taken to a second compound in the countryside near Pyongyang, where they were forced to study propaganda materials and beaten for straying from the compound's strict rules. In August, the North Koreans staged a phony news conference in which the prisoners were to praise their humane treatment, but the Americans thwarted the Koreans by inserting innuendoes and sarcastic language into their statements. Some prisoners also rebelled in photo shoots by casually sticking out their middle finger; a gesture that their captors didn't understand. Later, the North Koreans caught on and beat the Americans for a week.

    On December 23, 1968, exactly 11 months after the Pueblo's capture, U.S. and North Korean negotiators reached a settlement to resolve the crisis. Under the settlement's terms, the United States admitted the ship's intrusion into North Korean territory, apologized for the action, and pledged to cease any future such action. That day, the surviving 82 crewmen walked one by one across the "Bridge of No Return" at Panmunjon to freedom in South Korea. They were hailed as heroes and returned home to the United States in time for Christmas.

     

     

    Thank You so much........ And THANK YOU SO MUCH ON BEHALF OF ALL THE PUEBLO OFFICERS & MEN  !!!


     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    You all might also enjoy reading "Left To Die" by Dan Kurzman. Its an excellent account of the USS Juneau, WWII battleship that faced the exact same fate as the Indianapolis. It was days before the ship was even reported missing after it went down, so for a long time no one even knew it had sunk, so no one was looking. Its been years since Ive read it, but I believe some folks in the Navy lost thier heads over that blunder. Some sailors were killed in the trauma of the actual sinking, some drowned, some eaten by sharks after the ship went down, and many simply lost their minds after being lost at sea for so long. Many was the sailor treading water or afloat on debris that began joking and talking to their mates as if they were still on the ship, making comments like "hey man, Im gonna go below and get a sandwich", at which point they would roll off into the water and be eaten by sharks within seconds. No amount of yelling or convincing by their fellow sailors could tell them otherwise. They were still on the ship, were going below, and that was that. 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to georom4's comment:

    about 7 years ago, I had my students look this up online and the web site had some contact information with survivors - some of my kids wrote to these guys and asked them about their experiences and were thrilled when they wrote back - they were totally classy and grateful for my students interest in their story...once again proving they were...

    the greatest generation ever




    Geo, that's extremely cool.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to georom4's comment:

     

    about 7 years ago, I had my students look this up online and the web site had some contact information with survivors - some of my kids wrote to these guys and asked them about their experiences and were thrilled when they wrote back - they were totally classy and grateful for my students interest in their story...once again proving they were...

    the greatest generation ever

     



    Geo, that's extremely cool.

     

    yes lloyd - maybe the nicest teaching moment in my 23 years - i didnt expect them to make contact with my students and in fact warned the kids that given their age and truama, it was likely they would not respond...but more than few did and they were so gracious...

     



     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to georom4's comment:

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to georom4's comment:

     

    about 7 years ago, I had my students look this up online and the web site had some contact information with survivors - some of my kids wrote to these guys and asked them about their experiences and were thrilled when they wrote back - they were totally classy and grateful for my students interest in their story...once again proving they were...

    the greatest generation ever

     



    Geo, that's extremely cool.

     

    yes lloyd - maybe the nicest teaching moment in my 23 years - i didnt expect them to make contact with my students and in fact warned the kids that given their age and truama, it was likely they would not respond...but more than few did and they were so gracious...

     



      Thanks GEROME, your a good man !!!


     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to georom4's comment:

    yes lloyd - maybe the nicest teaching moment in my 23 years - i didnt expect them to make contact with my students and in fact warned the kids that given their age and truama, it was likely they would not respond...but more than few did and they were so gracious...


    Can only remember how rewarding that was for the kids, the veterans and you.

     

     
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  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to softlaw2's comment:

    I wrote a passage of humble thanks to the survivors and their lost brothers, on their official website. The journalist author of the book "In Harms Way", not one of the surviving veterans, emailed me back. Since my father was in the same pacific region for WWII, Guam, Tinian, it was even more compelling for me to read about this tragedy and the terrible way the Captain was treated. Everything about the Captain and his Crew demonstrates the best this Nation has to offer. What they had to endure to survive is truly courageous and inspirational.

    For those who are able, it is an enternal reward to be able to make memorial gifts to keep the story of their sacrifice and the sacrifice of all of our veterans, alive and remembered for posterity.    



    Good post. 

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from hill55. Show hill55's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    In response to georom4's comment:

    about 7 years ago, I had my students look this up online and the web site had some contact information with survivors - some of my kids wrote to these guys and asked them about their experiences and were thrilled when they wrote back - they were totally classy and grateful for my students interest in their story...once again proving they were...

    the greatest generation ever


    Great teaching exercise.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazyworldoftroybrown. Show crazyworldoftroybrown's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    Battle of Samar, with the Taffy 3 task Force. 5 inch guns, is all they had. They fought like warriors.
    Turned back, that huge force to save McArthur, and Save Halsey's but.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from AL34. Show AL34's posts

    Re: USS Indianapolis (CA-35)

    It was an incredible story as well as a Navy coverup. They blamed Captain McVay. The poor guy ended up taking his life over it.

     

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